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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 740 releases.
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Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
BioScience
Changing microbial dynamics in the wake of the Macondo blowout

Following the oil spill caused by the blowout at the Macondo wellhead in 2010, Gulf of Mexico microbial population dynamics shifted rapidly as numbers of oil degraders quickly increased. In addition, the spill provided an opportunity to study the newly described phenomenon of microbe-derived marine snow.

GOMRI’s Ecosystem Impacts of Oil and Gas Inputs to the Gulf and the Deep Sea to Coast Connectivity in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
JAMA
Study finds change in type of procedure most commonly used for bariatric surgery

In an analysis of the type of bariatric surgery procedures used in Michigan in recent years, sleeve gastrectomy (SG) surpassed Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in 2012 as the most common procedure performed for patients seeking this type of surgery, and SG became the predominant bariatric surgery procedure for patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study in the September 3 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
JAMA
Increase seen in use of double mastectomy, although procedure not associated with reducing risk of death

Among women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in California, the percentage undergoing a double mastectomy increased substantially between 1998 and 2011, although this procedure was not associated with a lower risk of death than breast-conserving surgery plus radiation, according to a study in the September 3 issue of JAMA. The authors did find that surgery for the removal of one breast was associated with a higher risk of death than the other options examined in the study.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Puerarin accelerates neural regeneration after sciatic nerve injury

Puerarin accelerates neural regeneration after sciatic nerve injury.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Chinese Science Bulletin
Are human breast milk microbiome ‘neutral’?

Human breast milk provides the best source of nutrients for infants and should have played a critical role for human evolution and civilization. It contains hundreds of bacteria forming the breast milk microbiome or microbiota; most of them are beneficial, but some opportunistic pathogens also exist in breast milk. Guan & Ma’s (2014) [Chinese Science Bulletin, No. 22] recent ecological analysis is aimed at understanding the mechanisms of bacteria diversity maintenance, species co-existences and distributions.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (No:61175071);“Top Scientists & Technologists Program of Yunnan Province”

Contact: Ma Zhanshan
samma@uidaho.edu
Science China Press

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Sensory reinnervation of muscle spindles after TN defect repaired by autologous vein graft

Sensory reinnervation of muscle spindles after TN defect repaired by autologous vein graft.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study finds that artificial selection to lengthen the fruit fly sex comb, a set of bristles used in courtship, results in a comb unable to rotate normally to a vertical position during development, suggesting that some morphologies may be developmentally disfavored.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
1st China International Conference on Positive Psychology
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Influence of taxi and car sharing on traffic and pollution

An online system that efficiently computes optimal taxi sharing strategies might cut cumulative taxi trip lengths by 40% or more while keeping passenger inconvenience to a minimum, a study finds.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Seeking water, oxygen, and chlorophyll on exoplanets

Space missions designed to detect life on exoplanets may be best served by a multi-tiered observing strategy in which telescopes are deployed to detect signatures of water, followed by selection of exoplanets likely to contain oxygen, and finally selection of the most promising exoplanets to search for chlorophyll, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A rapid, low-cost diagnostic for sickle cell disease

A blood test to diagnose sickle cell disease more rapidly and inexpensively than traditional tests has been developed, according to a study. Left untreated, sickle-shaped blood cells can impede circulation and cause a life-threatening complication known as a vasoocclusive crisis.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Strategic thinking in young children

Children demonstrate a sophisticated ability to think strategically at a young age, according to a study. Strategic interactions require individuals to reason about the behavior, mental states, and incentives of others, but the point at which children develop this ability remains unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Neanderthal rock engraving

A study of a rock engraving in Gorham’s Cave in Gibraltar finds that the cross-hatched impression was likely created by Neanderthals and represents Neanderthals’ capacity for abstract expression.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Influence of climate change on freshwater mountain runoff

Freshwater runoff from mountain ranges may be vulnerable to temperature increases that lengthen growing seasons and expand vegetative growth at high elevations, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Declining maize diversity

The diversity of maize varieties grown on farms across Mexico has declined in recent years, and this phenomenon may threaten crop yields in the face of climate change, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Researchers find Asian camel crickets now common in US homes

With their long, spiky legs and their propensity for eating anything, including each other, camel crickets are the stuff of nightmares. And now research from North Carolina State University finds that non-native camel cricket species have spread into homes across the eastern United States.

National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Applied Physics Letters
New method for non-invasive prostate cancer screening

A team of researchers led by Shaoxin Li at Guangdong Medical College in China has demonstrated the potential of a new, non-invasive method to screen for prostate cancer, a leading cause of cancer in men worldwide.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 30-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Ultrasonography evaluation of peripheral nerve injuries after an earthquake

Ultrasonography evaluation of peripheral nerve injuries after an earthquake.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science and Technology Review
Interpretation of the Ebola virus disease outbreak

On March 22, 2014, the ebola virus disease was found in Guinea, and then spread over the western African countries, such as Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. On August 8, 2014, WHO declared the ebola virus disease outbreak is one of the most serious in recent 40 years, constitute the international emergency public health events. Science and Technology Review published the feature to interpret and scientifically deal with ebola epidemics.

Contact: Tiantian
tiantian@cast.org.cn
86-010-621-85026
Science and Technology Review

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Rapamycin or FK506, which is better for SCs migration and peripheral nerve repair

Rapamycin or FK506, which is better for SCs migration and peripheral nerve repair

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
Paying Brazil’s farmers to conserve is worth the price, study suggests

A new study by Cristina Banks-Leite and colleagues suggests that it would cost Brazil 6.5% of its annual agricultural subsidies -- just 0.0092% of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP) -- to set aside the land needed to restore biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest to the same level observed in protected areas.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
A better measure of the distance to Pleiades

A debate regarding the distance to Pleiades, one of the closest star clusters to Earth, may finally be over, a new study reports. Knowing the distance to a star helps scientists determine several of its physical attributes.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
Genetic data sheds light on early peopling of North American Arctic

Using a combination of data from ancient and modern individuals, researchers have provided one of the clearest pictures yet of the population history of the North American Arctic, the last region of the Americas to be populated.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
Sequenced Ebola strains inform aspects of current epidemic

Researchers have sequenced 99 Ebola virus genomes from patients in West Africa, the site of the largest Ebola outbreak ever recorded. Their results provide insights into how and when Ebola virus (EBOV) entered human populations in the 2014 outbreak, and may guide approaches for managing Ebola’s spread and understanding therapeutic targets.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
China Science Bulletin
LBM simulation of CH4 flow inside porous rocks

The properties of fluid flow in rock are of vital significance to exploitation of oil and gas resources. This study incorporates 3D reconstruction and LBM methods to quantify and visualize the performance of CH4 flow in porous rock and the influence of excavation-induced deformation of porous system. It sheds new light on quantification and visualization of fluid flow in porous rock. See CHINESE SCIENCE BULLETIN (in Chinese), 2014, No. 22.

National Natural Science Foundation for Distinguished Young Scholars of China (Grant no. 51125017), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51374213), and National Basic Research Program of China (2010CB226804)

Contact: JU Yang
juy@cumtb.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Serotonin transporter is a mifepristone pharmacological target

Serotonin transporter is a mifepristone pharmacological target.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Showing releases 51-75 out of 740 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ]