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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 563 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Great Basin ecosystem energy dynamics

Although energy flow through a Great Basin ecosystem remained stable over the past 12,800 years, recent human activities may have significantly altered ecosystem dynamics, according to a study. Effects of environmental changes may be felt at the species and ecosystem levels.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Dichromacy and color preference

Differences in color vision can lead to differences in color preference, according to a study. Around 2% of males have dichromacy, a color vision deficiency in which one type of cone photoreceptor is missing. Leticia Álvaro and colleagues examined 32 individuals with normal color vision (trichromats) and 32 individuals lacking either L (red) or M (green) cones to determine how dichromacy affects individuals’ color preferences.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How cavefish survive food scarcity

A study identifies genetic changes that may underlie the metabolic adaptations of cavefish to their nutrient-poor habitats. Animals living in the relative obscurity of caves, where photosynthesis is virtually nonexistent, rely on decaying animal matter, flotsam from seasonal floods, and occasional bat droppings for nutrition, displaying efficient metabolism, resistance to starvation, and large reserves of body fat when food is available.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
JAMA
Studies examine cost-effectiveness of newer cholesterol guidelines and accuracy in identifying increased risk of CVD events

An examination of the 2013 guidelines for determining statin eligibility, compared to guidelines from 2004, indicates that they are associated with greater accuracy and efficiency in identifying increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and presence of subclinical coronary artery disease, particularly in individuals at intermediate risk, according to a study in the July 14 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Udo Hoffmann,M.D.,M.P.H.
mridings@partners.org
617-726-0274
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 11-Jul-2015
AAAS, publisher of Science, acquires peer review evaluation (PRE) service to help promote transparency and public trust in Science

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), publisher of the Science family of journals, today announced the acquisition of “Peer Review Evaluation” (PRE), a web-based service that promotes public trust in science by making the review of original research more transparent and verifiable.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Science
Roman concrete mimicked resistant rock in strained region of Italy

How does the Campi Flegrei caldera near Naples, Italy, withstand more uplift than other calderas without erupting? A new study shows that the caprock underlying this particular caldera closely resembles ancient Roman concrete -- and that the rock’s microstructures, characterized by intertwining fibrous minerals, lead to its exceptionally high strength.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Science
Jumping robots blend the best of both worlds

Researchers have designed a more efficient jumping robot with three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques and a combination of hard and soft materials. Inspired by designs in nature, such as snakes or insect larvae, soft-bodied robots are safer, more adaptable, and more resilient than their traditionally rigid counterparts, but molding and powering them has proved challenging.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Science
Pandas spend less energy to afford bamboo diet

A suite of energy-saving traits, including underactive thyroid glands, allows giant panda bears to survive almost exclusively on bamboo, according to a new study. Yonggang Nie and colleagues report the first measurements of daily energy expenditure (DEE) in these bears, which do not have stomachs designed for such low-nutrient, high-cellulose plants.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Science
Climate change -- compressing the bumblebee home range

While the geographic ranges of many animals are expanding northward in response to climate change, those of North American and European bumblebee species are shrinking, a new study shows. These insects are failing to migrate northward, the study reveals, and in their southern territories, their ranges are compressing -- with range losses up to 300 kilometers in both North America and Europe.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Sperm RNA, biomarker of male infertility, may predict success of fertility

A new study finds that sperm RNA can potentially serve as a valuable biomarker for diagnosing male infertility. Men whose sperm lacked critical RNA elements tend to have lower chances of naturally conceiving a child, researchers say. The results raise the possibility of using RNA analysis of semen to predict the success of different fertility treatments and direct infertile couples to the most effective therapy.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Biodegradable, flexible silicon transistors

Now researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison have come up with a new solution to alleviate the environmental burden of discarded electronics. They have demonstrated the feasibility of making microwave biodegradable thin-film transistors from a transparent, flexible biodegradable substrate made from inexpensive wood, called cellulose nanofibrillated fiber (CNF). This work opens the door for green, low-cost, portable electronic devices in future.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Global Environmental Change
New research: Rubber expansion threatens biodiversity and livelihoods

Increasing amounts of environmentally valuable and protected land are being cleared for rubber plantations that are economically unsustainable, new research suggests. More widespread monitoring is vital to design policy that protects livelihoods and environments.

Contact: Sander Van de Moortel
s.vandemoortel@cgiar.org
86-186-871-92010
World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report the production of a graphene-based ultrasonic microphone and an ultrasonic radio that have an ideal flat frequency response over the entire audible frequency range and up to 0.5 MHz in the ultrasonic range, potentially supplementing conventional wireless technology in places where the propagation of electromagnetic waves is difficult.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Global coal consumption and related emissions

A study finds that a resurgence of coal consumption may be primarily driven by poor but fast-growing developing economies and by the relatively low cost of coal.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate and ecosystem resilience

Researchers report a method for modeling the effects of climate on ecosystem resilience. The ability of an ecosystem to return to its previous state following a disturbance such as fire is closely associated with the speed with which the system recovers from such disturbances.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Efficacy of household influenza interventions

The efficacy of household-based interventions against influenza can be accurately measured by combining a well-designed disease transmission model and robust statistical inference, a study reports.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Measuring aging in young adults

Researchers report a method for quantifying the extent and pace of aging in young adults. As the global population ages, the burden of age-related disease and disability rises, prompting a need for anti-aging interventions.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
BioMed Central journals see growth in impact

A total of 175 journals in BioMed Central's publishing portfolio now have impact iactors in the recently published Journal Citation Report 2015, of which 104 journals rank in the top half of their categories

Contact: Joel Winston
joel.winston@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22081
BioMed Central

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
JAMA
Stroke associated with both immediate and long-term decline in cognitive function

In a study that included nearly 24,000 participants, those who experienced a stroke had an acute decline in cognitive function and also accelerated and persistent cognitive decline over 6 years, according to a study in the July 7 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
JAMA
Life expectancy substantially lower with combination of diabetes, stroke, or heart attack

In an analysis that included nearly 1.2 million participants and more than 135,000 deaths, mortality associated with a history of diabetes, stroke, or heart attack was similar for each condition, and the risk of death increased substantially with each additional condition a patient had, according to a study in the July 7 issue of JAMA.

Contact: John Danesh, F.Med.Sci.
erfc@phpc.cam.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Jul-2015
Science
Human antibody blocks dengue virus in mice

Researchers have discovered that a human antibody specific to dengue virus serotype 2, called 2D22, protects mice from a lethal form of the virus -- and they suggest that the site where 2D22 binds to the virus could represent a potential vaccine target.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Jul-2015
Science
Miniature landscapes show how hills and valleys form

Detailed tabletop experiments are helping researchers understand how Earth’s landscapes erode to form networks of hills and valleys. Their findings, which highlight a balance between processes that send sediments down hills and those that wash them out of valleys, might also help researchers predict how climate change could transform landscapes in the future.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Jul-2015
Science
Be square, seahorse; it has mechanical advantages

The seahorse tail is square because this shape is better at resisting damage and at grasping than a circular tail would be, a new engineering study shows. Insights gleaned from the study could inspire new armor and advances in robotics, the authors say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Jul-2015
Science
Unexpected enzyme may resurrect roses’ fading scents

Researchers working with roses have identified a long-sought enzyme, known as RhNUDX1, which plays a key role in producing the flowers’ sweet fragrances. These ornamental plants, which provide essential oils for perfumes and cosmetics, have been bred mostly for their visual traits, and their once-strong scents have faded over the generations.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
PLoS ONE
Hydroelectric dams drastically reduce tropical forest biodiversity

Widely hailed as ‘green’ sources of renewable energy, hydroelectric dams have been built worldwide at an unprecedented scale. But research from the University of East Anglia reveals that these major infrastructure projects are far from environmentally friendly.

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Showing releases 51-75 out of 563 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]