EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
24-May-2015 18:50
Beijing Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Breaking News

Multimedia Gallery

Subscribe/Sponsor

Interviews

Events Calendar

Selected Science Sources in China

MOST

CAS

CAE

CAST

NSFC

CASS

CAAS

CAMS

RSS

EurekAlert!

Text Size Option

Language

English (英文)

Chinese (中文)

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 605 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ultrasound production and sonar jamming by moths

The emergence of insectivorous bats likely drove the evolution of ultrasound detection and sonar-jamming ultrasound production in moths, according to a study. Many moth species have ears that are sensitive to the ultrasonic sound waves produced by bat sonar, and some moths also produce ultrasonic sound.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bird-feeding pastime might ruffle species balance

A study suggests that the urban pastime of feeding wild birds might upset the delicate balance between native and introduced bird species. In 2002 alone, more than 450 million kg of seeds were fed to wild birds as a pastime in the United States, by some estimates.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Groundwater contamination near Marcellus Shale gas wells

A sensitive analytical technique detects potential drinking water contamination by Marcellus Shale gas wells, according to a study. High-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) employs volumes of water, sand, and chemicals under extreme pressure to create cracks in deep rock formations, releasing natural gas deposits.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gradual evolution of bioluminescence in millipedes

Reconstructing the evolutionary history of a recently discovered bioluminescent millipede suggests that luminous millipedes likely experienced a gradual escalation of bioluminescent intensity through evolutionary time.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Autism and visual noise sensitivity

Certain perceptual impairments in autism spectrum disorder may be associated with a heightened sensitivity to sensory noise rather than with deficiencies in sensory integration, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Glucose, fructose, and appetite

Fructose may enhance the reward value of high-calorie food and promote eating, compared with glucose, according to a study. Differences in metabolism of fructose and glucose may lead to differential effects on physiological and behavioral responses to food.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
JAMA
Studies show effectiveness of new combination treatment for HCV patients with or without cirrhosis

In two studies appearing in the May 5 issue of JAMA, patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection and with or without cirrhosis achieved high rates of sustained virologic response after 12 weeks of treatment with a combination of the direct-acting-antiviral drugs daclatasvir, asunaprevir, and beclabuvir.

Contact: Fred Poordad,M.D.
amiha.khanna@duke.edu
210-567-3026
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Biomicrofluidics
Detecting cryptosporidium in China

Recently, researchers at Fudan University's Institute of Biomedical Sciences in Shanghai developed a lab-on-a-chip device that can rapidly diagnose Cryptosporidium infections from just a finger prick -- potentially bringing point-of-care diagnosis to at-risk areas in rural China in order to improve treatment outcomes.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Electronics you can wrap around your finger

Researchers from South Korea have taken a new step toward more bendable devices by manufacturing a thin film that keeps its useful electric and magnetic properties even when highly curved.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Science
Pre-human extinction rates reveal risks in the tropics

By combining data on the extinction rates of marine species over the past 23 million years with data on human activity and climate change, researchers have identified specific taxa and regions of the world -- the vast majority of them in the tropics -- that might be particularly vulnerable to extinction in the future.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Science
Personalized messages between brain regions revealed

A new study in live rats shows that the hippocampus -- an area of the vertebrate brain associated with spatial memory, anxiety, and reward -- selectively targets other brain regions with specific information. Until now, researchers had wondered whether such higher brain areas route communication to every component of the brain, leaving it up to the receiving regions to extract relevant information, or if they sent messages separately to different parts of the brain.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Science
Global warming accelerating world’s extinctions

One in six species on the planet could face extinction due to the effects of climate change if carbon emissions and changes proceed on their current trajectories, according to new research. Mark Urban performed a meta-analysis and found that, among other factors, climate change plays a major role in species’ extinctions.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Science
Inside lookat making of beetle’s toxic, pulsed spray

The distinct pulses of hot toxin that bombardier beetles spray at their predators are a product of a special expansion and contraction process inside the beetles’ defensive glands, a new study reports. A better understanding of how these glands produce (and survive) rapidly repeating explosions could pave the way for improvements in technologies such as fuel injectors for internal combustion engines.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
UC3M creates tool for monitoring brands on Twitter

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) has developed a monitoring tool with which brands can test the effects of their strategies on social networks. This program can control millions of “tweets” and reveal the strengths and weaknesses of brands in the Twitter universe.

Contact: fjalonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Science Translational Medicine
3D-printed, personalized device treats airway disease in infants

For up to nearly three years after implantation, a “4D biomaterial”—a 3D-printed medical device designed to change shape over time—improved breathing in three infants with a severe airway disease, according to a new study.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Physical mechanisms of summer spatiotemporal precipitation variations over mid-latitude Eurasia

One of the hotspots in studying climate change is the spatiotemporal precipitation variations. Now a scientific research has revealed the physical mechanisms of summer spatiotemporal precipitation variations over mid-latitude Eurasia on decadal, which was published in 2015 No.5 issue of Science China: Earth Sciences.

National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2010CB950202, No. 2012CB955301) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41130102)

Contact: HUANG Wei
whuang@lzu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Science Bulletin
Stature of Han Chinese dialect groups

The statures of 26,940 Chinese Han adults (16,503 rural adults and 10,437 urban adults) from 11 Han ethnic groups were measured and analyzed in the current survey. The statures of Northeast China dialect groups,North northern dialect Groups and Jianghuai dialect groups were is of top shape, and the Gan dialect groups was the shortest.

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30830062).

Contact: ZHENG Lianbin
zhenglianbin@sina.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Filter information of GC-content can enhance resolution of classifying bacteria

Among various methods of constructing Genome Tree, the K-String Composition Approach which is Alignment-Free shows nonnegligible superiority. By analyzing the correlation between species specificity of peptide composition and GC-content of corresponding genome, it is discovered that composition vector of peptide with appropriate length can filter the strong signal of GC-content, and therefore can effectively measure the genetic relationship of bacteria.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.11147020);Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No.GK201102028)

Contact: JIN Tao
jintao@snnu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Organic farming can reverse the agriculture ecosystem from a carbon source to a carbon sink

Now researchers showed that replacing chemical fertilizer with organic manure significantly decreased the emission of GHGs. Organic farming can reverse the agriculture ecosystem from a carbon source to a carbon sink. This finding has been recently published in Science Bulletin, 2015 NO.6 issue.

Key Strategic Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KSZD-EW-Z-012-2);National Science and Technology Support Program, China (No.2012BAD14B00)

Contact: Jiang Gaoming
jgm@ibcas.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
Embracing the 5G era

To meet the demands of 2020, the 5G research has attracted global attention and made remarkable progress. Now, researchers in China have overviewed the latest research progress on 5G systems and discussed its potential architecture and several promising key techniques. The research result has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences,no. 4,2015.

National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (Grant No. 2012CB316100);National High-tech R&D Program of China (863 Program) (Grant No. 2014AA01A707)

Contact: MA Zheng
zma@home.swjtu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Science Bulletin
Autonomous convergence and divergence of the self-powered soft liquid metal vehicles

Conventional rigid machines even living organism, generally do not own the capabilities like autonomous convergence or divergence. Based on the previous study on liquid metal enabled autonomous locomotion, a latest research demonstrated that if dividing a large running liquid metal vehicle into several smaller ones, each of them still resumes its traveling state along the original track. If several dispersive vehicles moved close to each other, they could coalesce seamlessly, and then kept moving forward. This study has been published on Science Bulletin, 2015.

Contact: LIU Jing
jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of 200 people identifies genetic alleles that may be associated with an increased risk of high-altitude pulmonary edema through regulation of the vasodilator apelin, which can regulate blood oxygen saturation during hypoxia.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Coordinating environmental restoration

Coordinating environmental restoration efforts on a large scale may be more cost-effective than having many local and regional organizations working independently, a study finds. Thomas Neeson and colleagues used a return-on-investment analysis to examine fish habitat restoration in watersheds of the North American Great Lakes.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Monitoring global hydrofluorocarbon emissions

Countries that report hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) emissions display reporting inaccuracies for individual HFCs, but high accuracy for combined HFC levels, according to a study. HFCs are organic compounds used in refrigeration, air conditioning, aerosol propellants, and other applications to replace ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Global warming, income, and air conditioning

Rising income throughout the world may drive increased use of air conditioning and electricity consumption, according to a study. Sales of electricity-intensive air conditioning units have grown rapidly in tropical and subtropical countries with growing economies.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 51-75 out of 605 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]