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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 731 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ]

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Three-dimensional conformal IMRT of left femur foci does not damage the sciatic nerve

Three-dimensional conformal IMRT of left femur foci does not damage the sciatic nerve

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Shutting down herpesvirus with epigenetics

Epigenetic drugs, a new class of pharmaceuticals that work by altering gene expression, can block herpesvirus infection in animals. The results hint that using epigenetic drugs to block the expression of herpesvirus genes in people could potentially be a new way to keep the virus under control. Different types of herpesvirus can causes sold cores around the mouth and eyes (ocular herpes) and genital herpes.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
A novel tissue engineering method for repair of sciatic nerve defects

A novel tissue engineering method for repair of sciatic nerve defects

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Impact of vasculature damage to the outcome of spinal cord injury

Impact of vasculature damage to the outcome of spinal cord injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Rat models of brachial plexus root avulsion injury-caused penile erectile dysfunction

Establishment of rat models of brachial plexus root avulsion injury-caused penile erectile dysfunction

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Chinese Optics Letters
New atomic filter with bandwidth close to the atomic natural linewidth

The research group, led by Prof. Mingsheng Zhan, from Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, achieved an ultranarrow bandwidth atomic filter working at the D1 line (795nm) of 87Rb atoms based on the quantum interference induced Faraday effect. It is reported in Chinese Optics Letters, Volume 12.

Contact: Xiaofeng Wang
wxf@siom.ac.cn
Chinese Laser Press

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Prescriptions for drugs to strengthen bones remains low despite recommended use for men receiving androgen deprivation therapy

Although some guidelines recommend use of bisphosphonates (a class of drugs used to strengthen bone) for men on androgen deprivation therapy, an analysis finds that prescriptions for these drugs remains low, even for those men at high risk of subsequent fractures, according to a study in the December 3 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Jane Finlayson
jane.finlayson@uhn.ca
416-946-2846
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Mental health professionals presented with a patient’s symptoms explained in genetic and biological terms may tend to feel less empathy toward that patient than a professional presented with symptoms explained in psychosocial terms, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Carnivorous plant fossils in Baltic amber

Researchers report the discovery of fossilized leaves of carnivorous flowering plants in 35-47 million-year-old Baltic amber. Remains of carnivorous plants in the fossil record are vanishingly rare, with the exception of seeds of the aquatic plant Aldrovanda.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Adaptation to ethanol among human ancestors

A study suggests that human predecessors first consumed ethanol approximately 10 million years ago, around the time that these ancestral apes were adapting to life on the forest floor. Some models had dated this milestone to around 9,000 years ago, during the advent of food storage and human-directed fermentation, suggesting that alcoholism in modern humans might reflect an incomplete genomic adaption because of the recent introduction of ethanol.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mastodon disappearance in Arctic latitudes

A re-examination of mastodon bone dates finds that the mammals disappeared from Arctic latitudes during a glacial period more than 50,000 years earlier than previously thought. Previous radiocarbon dating studies estimated that the last mastodons in the Arctic latitudes of northwestern North America disappeared around 18,000 years ago.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Evolution of HIV virulence

A study suggests that HIV’s virulence may be declining over time likely due to increasing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and accumulating viral mutations that allow HIV to evade the most effective immune responses generated against it.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Equid genomes and speciation theories

The evolutionary history of Equidae, the taxonomic family that includes horses, asses, and zebras, contradicts certain theories about speciation, according to a study. Although the richly detailed equine fossil record is often cited as an example of evolution, the succession of events that led to the diversity of modern-day equids remains unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How the plague bacterium co-opted fleas

The loss of an enzyme involved in the breakdown of urea might underlie the plague bacterium’s ability to spread through fleas, according to a study. The flea-borne plague bacterium Yersinia pestis blooms into a biofilm in a valve in the gut of fleas, inducing infected fleas to feed repeatedly by impeding their intake of blood meals from human hosts; the successive feeding attempts help transmit the bacterium to the host.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Recognizing plants in a new world

Comparison of Afro-Surinamese vernacular names for plants in Suriname with plant names in Africa reveals the extent to which enslaved Africans recognized New World plants, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tobacco smoking and alcohol withdrawal

A study suggests that tobacco smoking might block the recovery of the brain’s gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors during extended alcohol withdrawal. The role of tobacco smoking in the neuroadaptations and behavioral changes that occur during alcohol withdrawal in smokers who are also alcohol-dependent remains unclear, and a better understanding of tobacco’s role in alcohol withdrawal could be valuable in designing treatment strategies.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
BioScience
Ciliopathies Lie behind Many Human Diseases

Growing interest in cilia, which are finger-like organelles that extend from the bodies of individual cells, has revealed their role in a number of human ailments. As a result of cilia’s presence in a wide variety of cells, defects in them cause diverse human diseases that warrant further study.

National Institutes of Health, Robert W. Booth Endowment at the University of Massachusetts Medical School

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Role of ganglioside in repair of sciatic nerve defects using cryopreserved allografts

Role of ganglioside in repair of sciatic nerve defects using cryopreserved allografts

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
ENGINEERING TRIBOLOGY
Researchers develop a magnetic levitating gear

Researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) are developing a new transmission mechanism with no touching parts, based on magnetic forces which prevent friction and wear and make lubrication unnecessary. It can be applied in space travel and exploration but has also been adapted for use in other areas, such as the railroad and aircraft industries.

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
BMC Medicine
Study reveals significantly increased risk of stillbirth in males

A large-scale study led by the University of Exeter has found that boys are more likely to be stillborn than girls. Published in the journal BMC Medicine, the study reviewed more than 30 million births globally, and found that the risk of stillbirth is about ten percent higher in boys. This equates to a loss of around 100 000 additional male babies per year.

The Wellcome Trust

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
01-392-722-062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Role of ganglioside in repair of sciatic nerve defects using cryopreserved allografts

Role of ganglioside in repair of sciatic nerve defects using cryopreserved allografts

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
OEC injection repairs complete spinal cord transection-caused motor nerve injury

OEC injection repairs complete spinal cord transection-caused motor nerve injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Science
The genetic road to a sweeter cucumber

How sweet domestic cucumbers were derived from their bitter wild ancestors is clearer now, a new study reports. Small molecules in plants shape important relationships between these organisms and their environments. For example, in the family Cucurbitaceae, which includes cucumbers, cucurbitacin molecules convey a bitter taste that helps ward off herbivores.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Science
Surface structure as the secret to super-repellency

Researchers have designed a surface capable of repelling any liquid, including fluorinated solvents -- the wettest liquids of all -- and they achieved this super-repellency without the use of coatings. Tingyi Liu and Chang-Jin Kim describe this technique for rendering many different materials super-repellant to both oil and water simply by altering the roughness of the materials’ surfaces.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Science
Forget about it

Why do people recall some historical events, but not others? For example, U.S. presidents once known by all U.S. adults -- Fillmore, Buchanan, and McKinley, to name a few -- are now barely remembered. Here, Henry Roediger and K. Andrew DeSoto show that retention of cultural knowledge is based on factors including the “recency” and number of past exposures.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 51-75 out of 731 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ]