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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 519 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]

Public Release: 2-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Indonesian fires and smoke pollution

A study examines drought, fire, and smoke pollution in Indonesia.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate change and water supply from mountain catchments

Climate change can have contrasting effects on river flows and downstream water supply from two different high-altitude catchments, a study reports.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How children learn quantifiers

Children acquire words that denote quantity, such as the English “some” and “all,” in a predictable order across many different languages, a study finds.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
St. Paul Island mammoth extinction

Dry climate and sea level rise likely combined to drive one of the last woolly mammoth populations to extinction, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How birds and gliders soar

Insights into the strategies used by migratory birds to navigate turbulent environments may improve the design of long-distance autonomous gliders, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Constraints on human body form evolution

A study suggests that morphological differences between human populations might not always directly reflect natural selection.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Aug-2016
JAMA
Study compares treatments to improve kidney outcomes for patients with septic shock

Early use of vasopressin to treat septic shock did not improve the number of kidney failure-free days compared with norepinephrine, according to a study appearing in the August 2 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Stephen J. Brett
stephen.brett@imperial.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Aug-2016
JAMA
Study examines use of off-site monitoring of cardiac telemetry and clinical outcomes

Among non-critically ill patients, use of standardized cardiac telemetry with an off-site central monitoring unit was associated with detection and notification of cardiac rhythm and rate changes within 1 hour prior to the majority of emergency response team activations, and also with a reduction in the number of monitored patients, without an increase in cardiopulmonary arrest events, according to a study appearing in the August 2 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Andrea Pacetti
Pacetta@ccf.org
216-444-8168
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 29-Jul-2016
International Journal of Parallel Programming
A research project coordinated by UC3M helps reduce the cost of parallel computing

The European research project REPARA, which is nearing completion under the coordination of Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), has worked toward improving parallel computing applications for reducing costs, increasing performance, and improving energy efficiency, in addition to facilitating the maintenance of the source code.

Contact: fco javier alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 29-Jul-2016
Science
Rapid evolution helps plants disperse in disrupted environments

Rapid evolution drives the dispersion of plants in patchy habitats, a new experimental study shows.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Jul-2016
Science
Twisted optics: Seeing light from a new angle

Researchers have developed a technique to generate miniature light beams that are twisted, similar to a helix.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Jul-2016
Science
Tomatoes resist a parasitic vine by detecting its peptide

Tomato plants deter attacks by a parasitic plant by detecting one of its peptides, a new study reveals.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Jul-2016
Science
In France, hiring biases slightly favor women in male-dominated STEM fields

Women enjoy a slight advantage over men when applying to become science teachers in France, a new study suggests.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Jul-2016
PolyU discovers inadequate calcium, iron and iodine intakes of Hong Kong lactating women

The research team at the Laboratory for Infant & Child of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU)’s Food Safety and Technology Research Centre (FSTRC) has undertaken a study in breast milk to analyze the calcium, iron and iodine levels of breast milk of Hong Kong lactating women and their daily intakes of the respective micronutrients.

Contact: Margaret Ho
margaret.fc.ho@polyu.edu.hk
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Could microbiome disruptions explain HIV-exposed babies’ poor health?

HIV infection in mothers can disrupt the development of the gut microbiome of HIV-exposed but uninfected babies, potentially explaining why these infants are more vulnerable to death and disease, researchers report in a new study.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

In a mouse model of allergic asthma, researchers found that galectin-1 (Gal-1), a sugar-binding protein, regulated inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in the lung airways by modulating the function and fate of eosinophil proinflammatory cells recruited to allergic airways, suggesting a potential application for Gal-1 in the control of allergic asthma.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Oxygen and animal evolution

Researchers report a model of oxygen levels on Earth before the emergence of animal life.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Menopause and biological aging

A study suggests a link between menopause and biological aging.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Early-life disease exposure, adult mortality, and reproductive success

A study fails to find significant associations between increased early-life disease exposure and increased adult mortality or reproductive success.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Land use and urban water treatment costs

Twentieth century land use changes in the watersheds where cities obtain their water increased water treatment costs by approximately 50% for almost one in three cities worldwide, a study finds.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Natural disasters, ethnic fractionalization, and armed conflict

A study suggests a link between climate-related disasters and the likelihood of ethnic conflict.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Laboratory technique recapitulates egg cell development

A technique that recapitulates the process of egg cell formation in a dish could have implications for reproductive biology and regenerative medicine, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tracking seabirds to monitor ocean winds

The flight paths of seabirds can be used to estimate the speed and direction of ocean surface winds at a finer scale than measurements using satellites or floating buoys, a study reports.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wild waterfowl and avian influenza

A study suggests that undiscovered mechanisms may prevent wild waterfowl from sustaining highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza viruses (AIV).

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
JAMA
Study compares cognitive outcomes for treatments of brain lesions

Among patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases, the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone, compared with SRS combined with whole brain radiotherapy, resulted in less cognitive deterioration at 3 months, according to a study appearing in the July 26 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Joe Dangor
dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Showing releases 51-75 out of 519 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]