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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 522 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reducing side effects of dopamine treatment

Blocking a neurotransmitter scaffold protein improves motor function and reduces the side effects of dopamine treatment in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fungal evolution and Paleozoic coal production

The most significant coal-forming period in Earth’s history likely reflects tectonic activity during rainy climates in the tropics, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brewer’s yeast breed within wasp intestines

The yeast responsible for fermenting wine, beer, and bread (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mates within the intestines of wasps, a study finds.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jan-2016
University of Delaware professor’s research inspired by milk adulteration scandal in China

In 2008, thousands of children in China fell ill after drinking milk that had been adulterated with the chemical melamine.

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Public Release: 15-Jan-2016
A cultural look at moral purity: Wiping the face clean

Moral people have a pure heart. Immoral acts feel dirty.

Contact: Ken McGuffin
mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 15-Jan-2016
Science
Record-shattering cosmic blast could help crack the case of extreme supernova explosions

The superluminous supernova ASASSN-15lh might help scientists unlock the secrets of a rare class of celestial detonations.

Contact: Subo Dong
dongsubo@gmail.com
The Kavli Foundation

Public Release: 15-Jan-2016
Science
Newly discovered supernova outshines all others

In a new study, researchers describe the most luminous supernova yet observed, which resides in an unusual host galaxy.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Jan-2016
Science
Mammoth injuries indicate humans occupied arctic earlier than thought

The carcass of a frozen mammoth with signs of weapon-inflicted injuries suggests humans were present in the Eurasian Arctic ten millennia earlier than previously thought.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Jan-2016
Science
Inhibitory neurons determine learning plasticity, not age

A new study finds that, as zebra finches learn new songs, learning is determined not by the age of the bird, but by the inhibitory neurons that recognize acquired songs.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Jan-2016
Science
New pharmaceutical building block could accelerate drug development

Researchers have developed a family of reagents that can add tight ring-shaped structures to a wide variety of drug candidates.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
Nano Research
Direct writing of graphene patterns and devices on graphene oxide films by inkjet reduction

An inkjet reduction technique is developed to directly write conductive graphene patterns and devices on graphene oxide films. The directly-written graphene patterns show self-limiting reduction and a tunable electrical conductivity, and the devices show excellent functionalities. Thetechnique opens up a new path for the fabrication of graphene-based devices at a low temperature in an environment-friendly, highly-efficient, and scalable manner.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
Virtual reality for motor rehabilitation of the shoulder

Researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have developed a virtual reality system or motor rehabilitation of the shoulder. The prototype, which includes a built-in movement sensor, allows the user to do controlled exercises as part of a football game.

Contact: Francisco Javier Alonso
medios@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
BioScience
New insights into animal-borne disease outbreaks

To better understand the dynamics of zoonotic diseases, researchers have examined the epidemiology of plague among black-tailed prairie dogs. Their work points to biases that may threaten efforts to better characterize the vectors and transmission of diseases such as Ebola, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and others.

Washington University in St. Louis

Contact: James M Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Food allergy in infants linked to hyperactive immune response at birth

Babies who develop food allergy display hyperactive innate immune responses at birth, according to a study of about 1,000 infants.

Contact: Meagan Phelan
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
Nano Research
Arginine-mediated synthesis of cube-like platinum nanoassemblies as efficient electrocatalysts

The groups from Prof. Tang at Nanjing Normal University and Prof. Chen at Shaanxi Normal University reported the successful synthesis of cube-like Pt nanoassemblies by mean of the unique self-assembly property of arginine molecules. Due to the porous and rough surface of the nanoassemblies, the as-synthesized cube-like Pt nanoassemblies exhibited high electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation reaction.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
Nano Research
Observation of coupling between zero- and two-dimensional semiconductor systems based on anomalous diamagnetic effects

We report the direct observation of coupling between a single self-assembled InAs quantum dot and a wetting layer, based on strong diamagnetic shifts of many-body exciton states using magneto-photoluminescence spectroscopy. An anomalous positive (negative) diamagnetic coefficient is observed when an electron in the wetting layer (quantum dot) combines with a hole in the quantum dot, indicating the coupling between zero- and two-dimensional semiconductor structures.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
Science Bulletin
Physicists propose the first scheme to teleport the memory of an organism

The transporter in 'Star Trek' that can teleport a person from one location to a remote location is fascinating. In a recent study, physicists propose the first scheme to use electromechanical oscillators and superconducting circuits to teleport the internal quantum state (memory) and center-of-mass motion state of a microorganism. They also propose a scheme to create a Schrödinger’s cat state in which a microorganism is in two places at the same time.

Startup funding from Purdue University,National Basic Research Program of China,National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: LI Tongcang
tcli@purdue.edu
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
JAMA
Treatment for severe emphysema improves exercise capacity

In preliminary research for patients with severe emphysema, a minimally invasive intervention involving the implantation of coils in the lungs with an endoscope resulted in improved exercise capacity at 6 months, although with high short-term costs, according to a study in the Jan. 12, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Gaetan Deslee
gdeslee@chu-reims.fr
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
JAMA
Kidney failure risk equations show accuracy in geographically diverse patient population

Kidney failure risk equations developed in a Canadian population showed accuracy in predicting the 2-year and 5-year probability of kidney failure in patients with chronic kidney disease from over 30 countries with a wide range of variation in age, sex and race, according to a study in the Jan. 12, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that carbon, oxygen, and uranium isotope ratios in soil carbonate deposits provide evidence for a shift in North American atmospheric circulation resulting in wet summers between 70,000 and 55,000 years ago, characterized by enhanced northward moisture flow from the Gulf of Mexico relative to eastward flow from the Pacific.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Protecting individual privacy and public safety

Researchers report an algorithm that might help ensure the privacy of individual citizens while providing a mechanism to enable societal functions such as counterterrorism and infectious disease containment.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Enhanced efficacy of adjuvanted influenza vaccine in children

A study reports molecular correlates of enhanced immune response elicited by an adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine in children.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tropical forest expansion during glacial maximum

Some tropical forests likely expanded during the last glacial period, a study suggests, contradicting a popular explanation for how these biodiversity hotspots originated.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Parent and child grammatical preferences

Children may adopt grammatical features of language independent of their parents’ linguistic influence, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
Scientists adopted quantitative analysis techniques to demystify rumors on Chinese social media

The flourishing online social media has already become a breeding ground for rumors. A recent study collected a huge amount of rumors arising on Chinese social media, analyzed their forming, spreading and semantic characteristics by quantitative analysis techniques, and further proposed an automated rumor refutation framework integrating both machine and crowd intelligence.

National Natural Science Foundation of China,National Social Science Foundation of China,The National Basic Research Program

Contact: LIU Zhiyuan
liuzy@tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Showing releases 51-75 out of 522 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]