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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 613 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Chinese Science Bulletin
Progress of image registration method based on minimally invasive spinal surgery robot

Surgical robot, have gotten fast development. Meanwhile, the accuracy and stability of robot assisted surgery have been widely recognized by medical and industrial circle as well as patients. Shenyang Institute of Automation Chinese Academy of Science has got new achievements in the research of the minimally invasive spinal surgical robot. Image registration of single vertebra can solve the key problem of matching the preoperative image and postoperative image. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin, 2013, 58(S2).


Key Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61333019),National Key Technology R&D Program (Grant No. 2012BAI14B02) and Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of cooperation projects(Grant No.XBCD-2011-010)

Contact: ZHAO Yiwen
zhaoyw@sia.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Rescue robot, a good helper for earthquake rescue

Three domestic robots, rotor flying robot, transformable rescue robot and robotized life detector, played important roles in Lushan earthquake rescue in 2013, which have provided essential data and image information for disaster evaluation and rescue decision by rescue team of National Earthquake Response Support Service.


National key technology research and development program of China (Grant Nos. 2013BAK03B01,2014BAK12B01);National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61203334,60705029)

Contact: QI Juntong
qijt@sia.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
JAMA
Medication does not help prevent erectile dysfunction following radiation therapy for prostate cancer

Among men undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, daily use of the erectile dysfunction drug tadalafil, compared with placebo, did not prevent loss of erectile function, according to a study in the April 2 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Thomas M. Pisansky, M.D.
Eisenman.Rebecca@mayo.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
JAMA
Administering blood transfusions to patients with lower levels of hemoglobin associated with lower risk of serious infection

Restricting red blood cell (RBC) transfusions among hospitalized patients to those with hemoglobin (the iron-containing protein in RBCs) measures below a certain level is associated with a lower risk of health care-associated infections, according to a study in the April 2 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Mary A.M. Rogers, Ph.D.
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Muscle tissue grown from rat myogenic cells and engineered to mimic the highly organized structure of native muscle tissue, including a functioning stem cell pool, was transplanted into mice, and found to rapidly integrate into the mouse vascular network and develop structural, functional, and regenerative properties similar to native muscle, suggesting that differentiation of muscle cells prior to implantation enhances engineered muscle tissue function in vivo, according to a study.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Universal syllable preferences in newborns

Newborn brains respond differently to syllables that are frequent across languages than to rare syllables, a study finds, suggesting that linguistic preference for certain syllable types might be a universal, innate principle.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Past climate change and marine carbon dioxide release

Changes in ocean circulation may have contributed to the end of the last ice age, a study finds. Researchers investigating the abrupt endings of Pleistocene glaciation hypothesized that glacial melting may have interrupted global ocean circulation patterns in the North Atlantic, triggering release of carbon dioxide from the Southern Ocean and further driving deglaciation.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hypoxia in the Baltic Sea

Declining oxygen levels in the Baltic Sea might be primarily due to increased amounts of nutrients entering the sea from the land, according to a study. Deoxygenation of deep sea waters results when oxygen consumption from algae production, stimulated by an overabundance of anthropogenic nutrients, exceeds the supply of oxygen from physical water-mixing processes.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Recognition of complex human facial expressions

According to a study of 21 basic and complex human facial expressions of emotion, individuals may express a broader range of emotions via uniquely identifiable facial expressions than previously thought. Human cognition studies often employ photographs of facial expressions of emotions, including happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How humans learn grammar

Humans might have an inherent cognitive bias toward using semantic hierarchies rather than superficial word-order rules when learning new languages, a study suggests. How humans learn grammar is a fundamental question in psychology and linguistics.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Early rehabilitation improves postsurgery neurofunctional outcome in spinal tumor children

In children, primary spinal tumors comprise 4–8% of all tumors from the central nervous system.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Wen Dan Tang improves insomnia-related anxiety

Ghrelin, a brain-gut peptide that induces anxiety and other abnormal emotions, contributes to the effects of insomnia on emotional behavior.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
NTS’s role in the protection of pre-moxibustion on gastric mucosal lesions

NTS’s role in the protection of pre-moxibustion on gastric mucosal lesions Moxibustion may have protective effects on the stomach mucous membrane against stress gastric ulcer.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Mild hypothermia for treatment of diffuse axonal injury: a quantitative DTI analysis

Mild hypothermia has been shown to exert apparent neuroprotective effects in animal models of diffuse axonal injury.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 29-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
How does acupuncture at Baihui and Dazhui reduce brain cell apoptosis in heroin readdicts?

Acupuncture has therapeutic effects on cerebral ischemia, dementia, epilepsy and other brain diseases, and also functions to repair the nervous system.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 29-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Resting-state functional connectivity as an auxillary diagnosis of depression

According to a paper published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 9, No. 2, 2014), both depressive patients and healthy controls presented typical small-world attributes, and compared with healthy controls, characteristic path length was significantly shorter in depressive patients, suggesting development toward randomization.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 29-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Role of type-2 astrocytes on the repair of spinal cord injury

Increasing expression of bone morphogenetic proteins at the lesion site of the central nervous system possibly induces oligodendrocyte precursor cells to differentiate into type-2 astrocytes.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Optimal duration of percutaneous microballoon compression for trigeminal nerve injury

Percutaneous microballoon compression of the trigeminal ganglion is a brand new operative technique for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Aspartic acid in the hippocampus: a biomarker for postoperative cognitive dysfunction

Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is the deterioration of cognitive performance after anesthesia and surgery, and manifests as impairments in short-term memory, concentration, language comprehension, and social integration skills.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Mar-2014
PLoS ONE
Using tobacco to thwart infectious disease?

An international research group led by Arizona State University professor Qiang "Shawn" Chen has developed a new generation of potentially safer and more cost-effective therapeutics against West Nile virus, and other pathogens.


Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-258-8972
Arizona State University

Public Release: 28-Mar-2014
Journal of Community Genetics
Time, trust and transparency keys to minority biospecimen collection

Blood and tumor specimen collection from cancer patients is critical to research into new, more personally targeted therapies. But biospecimen collection among diverse populations lags far behind that of whites.


Contact: Dorsey Griffith
Dorsey.griffith@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9118
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 28-Mar-2014
Science
Brain-wide map ties neurons to behaviors

Linking circuits of neurons to specific behaviors in a live organism has proved to be notoriously difficult. But, Joshua Vogelstein and colleagues have developed a new technique for investigating such neuronal circuits -- as well as the behavior those circuits inspire -- and they used it to create a reference atlas for neurons in Drosophila, or fruit fly, larvae.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-334-1310
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Mar-2014
Science
Special issue dedicated to breast cancer

Twenty years ago, a team of researchers cloned and sequenced BRCA1 -- a human tumor suppressor gene that, when mutated, increases one’s risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Isolation of the related cancer predisposition gene, BRCA2, followed shortly thereafter. And since then, more than one million people have been tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, a screening process that has saved many lives.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Mar-2014
Science
Early programs help disadvantaged kids have better adult health

A new study suggests that disadvantaged children who undergo high-quality intervention programs in the first five years of life have better physical health as adults than disadvantaged children who do not.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Mar-2014
Science
“Mount Everest” of synthetic biology -- virst eukaryotic chromosome

For the first time, researchers have synthesized a eukaryotic chromosome, a new study reports. The chromosome was from one of the best-studied organisms on the planet, baker’s yeast, or Saccharomyces cerevisiae.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 51-75 out of 613 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]