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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 621 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Acta Biomaterialia
Metal in the heart is non-hazardous to health

Materials Scientists at the University of Jena examine implants made of nickel-titanium alloy in a long-term study


Contact: Dr.-Ing. Andreas Undisz
andreas.undisz@uni-jena.de
0049-364-194-7768
Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
660 nm red light-enhanced BMSCs transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

A series of previous studies suggested that the neuronal differentiation rate of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells during the in vitro culture reached 78–92%, but their in vivo transplantation efficiency, and survival and differentiation rates were very low.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Polysaccharides from Angelica sinensis alleviate oxidative damage to neurons

According to traditional Chinese medicine, the roles of Angelica sinensis correlate with tonifying the blood and promoting its circulation.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
JAMA
Study examines criteria for 'choosing wisely' lists of least beneficial medical services

In the creation of lists by specialty societies of medical services deemed least beneficial (the “Choosing Wisely” initiative), inclusion was often justified by evidence suggesting no additional benefit with higher risk, higher cost, or both, compared with other options, according to a study in the April 9 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Steven D. Pearson, M.D., M.Sc.
Molly.Hooven@nih.gov
301-594-5789
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
JAMA
Comparison of treatments for advanced lung cancer shows chemotherapy may be best for certain patients

Among patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer without a mutation of a certain gene (EGFR), conventional chemotherapy, compared with treatment using epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, was associated with improvement in survival without progression of the cancer, but not with overall survival, according to a study in the April 9 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Dong-Wan Kim, M.D., Ph.D.
kimdw@snu.ac.kr
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Graphic photos on tobacco packs save lives: WHO report

Large, graphic health warnings on tobacco packets in China would increase awareness about the harms of smoking, help to cut smoking rates, and in doing so save lives according to global studies. These are the key findings from a new report, Tobacco health warnings in China – Evidence of effectiveness and implications for action, from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC Project), released today.


World Health Organization

Contact: Nick Manning
wul@wpro.who.int
86-106-532-7191
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mammalian species of India stable for the last 200,000 years

The continuity of mammalian taxa in southern India over the last 100,000 to 200,000 years suggests that the species were likely more tolerant to glacial and volcanic climate changes and human interference than taxa in many other regions of the globe. Sediment sequences, which are layers of sediment deposited through time that may contain fossils, can present a timeline of faunal appearances and extinctions in a region.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Computerized games and school performance

Computerized games that improved six-year-old children's cognitive processes also improved their grades in school, a study reports. Andrea Goldin and colleagues investigated how playing a set of adaptive computerized games over a period of 10 weeks affected the cognitive and academic performance of 111 low socioeconomic status first-graders from two public schools in Buenos Aires, Argentina.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Soloists judge new and old Italian violins

Despite the long-standing reputation of old Italian violins as tonally superior to new instruments, a study finds that renowned violin soloists cannot distinguish old violins from new ones, and that the soloists tend to prefer the new violins.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Alcohol and social bonding in prairie voles

Drinking alcohol inhibits pair bond formation in male prairie voles and may strengthen pair bonding in females, a study suggests. To test alcohol’s effect on social attachment, Andrey Ryabinin and colleagues studied prairie voles, commonly used to study social bonding because the animals form life-long monogamous bonds.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Neurobiological basis of gambling fallacies

Warped cognitive perceptions of games of chance that are linked to compulsive gambling may be due to activity in a brain region known as the insula, a study finds. Gamblers often make risky decisions based on distorted perceptions of skill, luck, and probability. Chief among the distortions are illusions of control over games of chance and detection of patterns in random sequences.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Telomeres and social disadvantage

Children who experience chronic stress from a disadvantaged life have shorter telomeres than their advantaged peers, according to a study. The detrimental health effects of long-term chronic stress may be related to the shortening of telomeres, which are DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

In a study of 325 individuals given d-amphetamine, a drug that causes the release of dopamine and induces a subjective sense of euphoria, participants who were highly susceptible to the effects of the drug also had DNA sequence variations in regions of their genome that are associated with a low risk for schizophrenia and ADHD, suggesting a role for dopamine in schizophrenia and ADHD.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Neuropsychologia
Faces we don’t forget

Psychologists at the University of Jena (Germany) explain how attractiveness prevents the recognition of faces.


Contact: PD Dr. Holger Wiese
holger.wiese@uni-jena.de
0049-364-194-5185
Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Clinical value of ginsenoside Rb1 against neuronal damage following cerebral ischemia

ctivated microglia-mediated inflammation promotes neuronal damage under cerebral hypoxic-ischemic conditions, so it is likely that inhibiting hypoxia-induced activation of microglia will alleviate neuronal damage.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Vascular changes caused by deep brain stimulation using brain MRI

Deep brain stimulation has been widely used to treat patients with movement disorders and increasing attention has been paid to its use in the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Science
Miniaturized mobile health monitoring

What if a pregnant mother or a chronically ill patient were able to take some of the expensive hospital equipment used to monitor their health, like an electrocardiogram (ECG) machine, home with them?


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Science
Putting one foot behind the other

A fruit fly backing away from a moist morsel of banana may seem an odd sight, but the fly can do it, and now scientists have discovered that just two neurons control this ability to back up. This discovery may shed light on how other legged animals choose between backward and forward motion. The ability to put one foot behind the other isn’t limited to humans.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Science
Designing plant cell walls that fall apart

Desperate for lignin to more easily break down, scientists have tried all kinds of chemical tricks, and now a new study reports a key advance in this field. Lignin keeps plants upright, but it also makes them very hard to break down for industrial processes like biofuel production or digestion of alfalfa, an important forage crop for cattle.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Science
Underground ocean on encedalus captured by cassini

New results from the Cassini spacecraft, which has been among Saturn’s moons for the past 10 years, show that Enceladus -- one of the planet’s smaller moons -- harbors an ocean of water beneath 18 to 24 miles (30 to 40 kilometers) of ice.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Resting-state functional connection during low back pain

The default mode network is a key area in the resting state, involving the posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, medial prefrontal and lateral temporal cortices, and is characterized by balanced positive and negative connections classified as the “hubs” of structural and functional connectivity in brain studies.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Promising new treatment for age-related macular degeneration

Injections of IL-18, a protein being tested in clinical trials to treat some cancers, helps control the creation of new blood vessels in the eye, and could be a new treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD).


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Optimal distance between two electrode tips during recording of compound nerve action potentials

Optimal distance between two electrode tips during recording of compound nerve action potentials


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Science China:Life Sciences
New tree-planting technique for ecological control of desert

Desert drought is generally considered as the major factor that results in the low survival rate and poor growth of seedlings of desert plants. But recent research using desert plant Haloxylon ammodendron discovered that high desert surface temperature (≥ 50oC) is actually a major limiting factor under numerous desert habitats. Based on the discovery, a new tree-planting technique for desert afforestation is invented. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences (In Chinese), 2014, No.3.


National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31260181); Transformation Fund for Agricultural Science and Technology Achievements (Grant No. 2012GB2G400497).

Contact: MA Hao
Lq-ncsi@njau.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
China Science Bulletin
Research progress of the Chinese Polar Rover Robot

Considering the requirements of the Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition, Shenyang Institute of Automation has developed three generations of polar rover robots, focusing on rover mobility, long-range autonomous navigation, and scientific payload operation, etc. The first and third rover have been deployed and conducted lots of experiments on the Antarctic in 2007 and 2011 respectively. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin, 2013, 58(S2).


Key Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61035005),National High-Tech Research and Development Plan (Grant No.

Contact: BU Chunguang
cgbu@sia.cn
Science China Press

Showing releases 51-75 out of 621 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]