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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 536 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 1-Jul-2016
Science
For frigatebirds, staying aloft for months is a breeze

Frigatebirds, which can stay aloft for months at a time, capitalize on atmospheric conditions in order to spend very little energy while flying over hundreds of miles a day, a new study shows.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 1-Jul-2016
Science
The start of 'healing' for the antarctic ozone hole?

After persisting for decades, the hole in the ozone over the Antarctic has begun to 'heal,' exhibiting an ozone increase, a new study reports.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Jun-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Genetic risk for common kidney disease uncovered

In a new study of about 3,000 individuals, researchers have uncovered genetic variations that raise the risk of developing a common kidney disease.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Jun-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Radiation-guided nanoparticles zero in on metastatic cancer

Zap a tumor with radiation to trigger expression of a molecule, then attack that molecule with a drug-loaded nanoparticle.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Jun-2016
Nano Research
Silk nanofibers as high efficient and lightweight air filter

High efficient and lightweight nanofiber air filter derived from silkworm silk is developed, which shows superior filtration performance for both of PM2.5 and submicron particles. Based on these superior performance and the attractive features of silk, such as high efficiency, low airflow resistance, lightweight, human and environmental benignity as well as multifunctionality, silk nanofibers show great potential for applications in air filtration, especially for personal air purifiers.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Journal of Insect Science
Fungi can be used to control filth fly adults and reduce egg laying

Stable flies and house flies are a concern in livestock and poultry farming because they can transmit harmful pathogens, and animals can harm themselves while trying to avoid bites from the flies.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Blocking key enzyme halts parkinson’s disease symptoms in mice

Researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have gleaned two important new clues in the fight against Parkinson’s disease: that blocking an enzyme called c-Abl prevents the disease in specially bred mice, and that a chemical tag on a second protein may signal the disorder’s presence and progression.

This work was supported by grants from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (grant numbers NS38377 and NS082205), the JPB Foundation, and a Parkinson’s Disease Foundation Summer Student Fellowship (number PDF-SFW-1572). Dawson is th

Contact: Alsy Acevedo
aaceved5@jhmi.edu
410-464-6457
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of carbon dioxide exchange between the Alaskan landscape and the atmosphere finds that current airborne and satellite observation strategies adequately detect shifts in vegetative uptake of carbon dioxide during the summer but cannot sufficiently quantify carbon dioxide release from soil respiration during the cold season, and suggests that year-round sampling across the continental interior is needed to detect the potentially large carbon dioxide release from future permafrost thaw.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Dengue immunity and Zika infection

Prior exposure to the dengue virus may either protect against or enhance the ability of the Zika virus to infect human cells, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Plastic recycling and environmental waste

A single-step approach for repurposing polycarbonates might help reduce plastic waste while producing tough, robust materials for a variety of applications, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genomic selection in US dairy cattle

A study suggests that in the 7 years following implementation of genomic selection in US dairy cattle, the average age of parent cattle at birth of their offspring, called the generation interval (GI), has decreased.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Groundwater salinity in California

A study examines the salinity of groundwater down to a kilometer or more below California.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Household devices and air pollution in China

Reducing emissions from inefficient household space heaters and cooking devices could help China address severe air pollution in major cities, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
JAMA
Intervention does not improve mental health-related quality of life among survivors of sepsis

In a study appearing in the June 28 issue of JAMA, Jochen Gensichen, M.D., M.Sc., of Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany, and colleagues randomly assigned 291 patients who survived sepsis (including septic shock) to usual care (n = 143) or to a 12-month intervention (n = 148) to assess whether the primary care-based intervention would improve mental health-related quality of life.

Contact: Jochen Gensichen
jochen.gensichen@med.uni-jena.de
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
JAMA
Antidepressant does not reduce hospitalization, death, or improve mood for heart failure patients with depression

In a study appearing in the June 28 issue of JAMA, Christiane E. Angermann, M.D., of University Hospital Wurzburg, Germany, and colleagues examined whether 24 months of treatment with the antidepressant escitalopram would improve mortality, illness, and mood in patients with chronic heart failure and depression.

Contact: Christiane E. Angermann
Angermann_C@ukw.de
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Jun-2016
New Robot AntiAgeist joins jury of Beauty.AI 2.0

-Insilico Medicine developed an algorithm called AntiAgeist, which compares actual human age with “perceived” human age predicted by deep neural networks. The algorithm is part of Insilico Medicine’s effort to build a comprehensive and actionable deep–learned biomarker of human aging and general health status recently published and available at Aging.AI Beauty.AI 2.0 is the second beauty competition, where humans are evaluated by a panel of robot judges with prizes for human participants and for innovative algorithms

Contact: Qingsong Zhu
zhu@insilicomedicine.com
443-451-7212
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Science Bulletin
The cause of high Tc superconductivity at the interface between FeSe and SrTiO3

In 2012 a superconductor with potentially very high critical temperature was discovered at the interface between an atomically thin iron selenide (FeSe) film grown on strontium titanate (SrTiO3) substrate. Now a research team made up of Beijing and Berkeley scientists have carried out the first approximation-free theoretical study to identify the cause of high critical temperature in such system.

中国国家自然科学基金(11474175, 11374018)美国能源部基础能源材料科学和工程部门(DE-AC02-05CH11231)

Contact: Hong Yao
yaohong@tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
JAMA
Medications to prevent additional stroke may be less effective for patients with certain gene variants

In a study published online by JAMA, Yongjun Wang, M.D., of Capital Medical University, Beijing, and colleagues examined the association between variants of the gene CYP2C19 and clinical outcomes of clopidogrel-treated patients with minor stroke or transient ischemic attack. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the Second Annual Scientific Session of the Chinese Stroke Association and the Tiantan International Stroke Conference in Beijing.

Contact: Yongjun Wang
yongjunwang1962@gmail.com
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Science
Maximizing biomedical research through integrated science

In this Policy Forum, Phillip Sharp and colleagues discuss the need for better integration of engineering, physical, computational, and mathematical sciences with biomedical science, as they publish a report this week outlining some key recommendations.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Science
Single gene drives prostate differentiation

Expression of a single gene can convert cells lining the seminal vesicle into prostate cells, a new study shows.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Science
Why fathers don’t pass on mitochondria to offspring

Offering insights into a long-standing and mysterious bias in biology, a new study reveals how and why mitochondria, a component essential to cell functioning in multicellular organisms, is only passed on through a mother’s egg and not the father’s sperm.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Science
Public’s moral inconsistencies create dilemmas for programming driverless cars

When it comes to autonomous cars, people generally approve of cars programmed to sacrifice their passengers to save others, but these same people are not enthusiastic about riding in such 'utilitarian' vehicles themselves, a new survey reveals.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Jun-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Mini-guts predict cystic fibrosis patients’ response to therapy

Mini-guts grown in the lab using cystic fibrosis patients’ cells can help pinpoint those who are most likely to benefit from new drugs, according to a new study.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jun-2016
Asia Genomics and Insilico Medicine partner to extend healthy human longevity

Insilico Medicine Inc, announced an agreement with Asia Genomics to develop advanced biomarkers of aging and personalized longevity for the Asian population.

Contact: Qingsong Zhu
zhu@insilicomedicine.com
443-451-7212
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers used transcriptomic and proteomic methods as well as biochemical analysis to characterize antibodies from oligoclonal immunoglobulin bands (OCB), a multiple sclerosis (MS) biomarker, and found that OCB antibodies and autoantigens from four MS patients, 27-34 years of age, were ubiquitous intracellular proteins not specific to brain tissue, suggesting that rather than mediating direct tissue destruction, OCB might be indicative of a secondary immune response in MS.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 51-75 out of 536 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]