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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 695 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 ]

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Predictive ability and autism spectrum disorders

Autism spectrum disorders may be partially attributable to an impaired ability to predict future events, researchers suggest. Predictive ability plays a role in individuals’ perception of and interaction with their surroundings.

Contact: Annie Cardinaux
anniec@mit.edu
617-324-5493
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Pollution reduction and low-carbon technologies

Constructing a low-carbon electricity infrastructure sufficient to meet projected 2050 electricity demands is feasible using current production levels of iron, copper, and cement, and may double electricity supply while stabilizing or reducing air and water pollution, according to a study.

Contact: Thomas Gibon
thomas.gibon@ntnu.no
474-101-5246
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of lunar rock samples from the Apollo missions finds that water in the moon’s surface minerals was likely generated by bombardment of particles from the solar wind and not by water-rich meteorite or comet impacts.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
“Virological Penicillin”:Plant MIR2911 directly targets influenza A viruses

In a new study, Chen-Yu Zhang’s group at Nanjing University present an extremely novel finding that a plant microRNA, MIR2911, which is enriched in honeysuckle, directly targets influenza A viruses (IAV) including H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9. Drinking of honeysuckle soup can prevent IAV infection and reduce H5N1-induced mice death.

This work was supported by grants from the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2014CB542300), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 81101330, 31271378 and 81250044), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Provin

Contact: Xi Chen
lisacx86@nju.edu.cn
0086-258-359-2706
Nanjing University School of Life Sciences

Public Release: 4-Oct-2014
Experts recommend against diagnosing testosterone deficiency in women

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) advising against the use of testosterone therapy in healthy women.Androgens are a group of sex hormones that includes testosterone. DHEA is a prohormone that can be converted into testosterone or estradiol, a form of estrogen. While these are often thought of as male hormones, small amounts of androgens also are found in women.

Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
World Falling Short of Biodiversity Goals for 2020

A mid-term assessment of the 20 biodiversity-related “Aichi Targets,” which were agreed upon by 150 nations at the Convention on Biological Diversity in 2010, reveals that although the global community has made some progress, these goals are unlikely to be met by 2020.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
Satellite Data Reveal Wealth of Hidden Tectonic Structures

Using the latest data from satellites in space, scientists have uncovered uncharted features in the seafloor, 80% of which remains unmapped. The rifts, ridges and trenches of the ocean floor are shaped by the slipping and sliding of massive tectonic plates. In many parts of the ocean, however, including the region of the Indian Ocean where the Malaysian aircraft was lost this year, scientists don't know much about seafloor tectonics.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
Cheetahs and Pumas Strike a Balance to Hunt

Being a carnivore -- stalking, chasing and killing your prey -- is hard work. But two new studies show that cheetahs and pumas have their hunts down to a science. The studies suggest that mid-size predators, or mesopredators, may not be as energetically constrained by resources and competition as researchers had imagined. However, they also imply that human activity could offset the delicate balance these mesopredators have struck over thousands of years of evolution.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
Uncovering the Hidden History of AIDS’ Spread

To help shed light on AIDS’ early history, Nuno Faria et al. analyzed HIV-1 group M sequences from a major HIV sequence database; by combining these analyses with spatial and epidemiological data, they were able to show that the HIV-1 group M pandemic originated in Kinshasa, now the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo, in the early 1920s.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
High Blood Sugar May Worsen Spinal Cord Injury

Scientists have discovered yet another reason to curb sugar consumption: high levels of it in the blood may make recovery after spinal cord injury harder. Controlling blood sugar levels in patients with spinal cord injury could potentially help doctors prevent additional neurological deterioration.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderson@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Physics of Fluids
Laser-Guided Herds of Sea Monkeys Show how Zooplankton Migrations May Affect Global Ocean Currents

Two researchers at the California Institute of Technology have shown experimentally that this pattern creates water currents much larger than the sum of those created by individual organisms in the group. Their results, published in the journal Physics of Fluids, from AIP Publishing, suggest that the collective movement of small marine organisms could affect global ocean circulation patterns on a level comparable to the wind and the tides.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
New estimates on carbon emissions triggered by 300 years of cropland expansion in Northeast China

The land use activities caused large carbon emissions since the industrial revolution. This quantitative carbon emission evaluation of the cultivation in Northeast China during the past 300 years indicated that the forest and grassland were the main carbon sources, and the soil lost more carbon than the vegetation. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences(In Chinese), 2014, No.9.

China Global Change Research Program (Grant No. 2010CB950103), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 40901099)

Contact: LI Beibei
libeibei-sd@163.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Climate and canoe voyaging during South Pacific migrations

A pair of studies investigates canoe-building technologies and likely climate conditions that allowed early Polynesians to colonize areas such as New Zealand and Easter Island. Archaeological evidence suggests a rapid colonization of Polynesian islands, including New Zealand, around 1300 AD.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Bark beetle outbreaks and Rocky Mountain forest fires

Mountain pine beetle infestation in Rocky Mountain subalpine forests may not necessarily be related to subsequent forest fire severity, according to a study. Mortality of lodgepole pine trees due to bark beetle infestation has raised concerns that beetle-killed trees may lead to more severe fires in the western United States.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Treatment of a mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, an accumulation of heparin sulfate that results in dementia and other neurological disorders, with an altered alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase enzyme injected into the brain’s ventricular system, decreased heparin sulfate accumulation to non-pathological levels, and suggests a potential enzyme replacement approach to treating the disease, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Bat fatalities at wind farms

According to a study, tree-roosting bats may suffer higher fatality rates at many wind turbine sites than other bat species because air currents surrounding the turbines mimic those that surround tall trees.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences
Liquid phase 3D printing method with low melting point alloy ink was invented

A latest study proposed and demonstrated a liquid-phase 3D printing for quickly manufacturing conductive metal objects. Through introducing a four-element alloy Bi35In48.6Sn16Zn0.4 whose melting point is slightly above room temperature as the printing ink, a series of typical structures were fabricated in the cooling liquid via a convenient way. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences, 2014, Vol 57(9).

Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KGZD-EW-T04-4)

Contact: LIU Jing
jliu@mail.ipc.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Smithsonian scientists discover coral's best defender against an army of sea stars

Coral reefs face a suite of perilous threats in today's ocean. From overfishing and pollution to coastal development and climate change, fragile coral ecosystems are disappearing at unprecedented rates around the world. Despite this trend, some species of corals surrounding the island of Moorea in French Polynesia have a natural protector in their tropical environment: coral guard-crabs.

Contact: Kathryn Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Human trafficking, an invisible problem

Human trafficking is a problem about which little is known in Spain, due to both the lack of reliable figures as well as the poor coordination among international police forces and the social permissiveness with regard to certain behavior related to the sex trade. These are some of the conclusions of a report funded by the European Union and written by a research team in which experts from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) participated.

Contact: Fco. Javer Alonso
fjalonso@bib.uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
DRI expands Chinese partnership to address water pollution, management issues

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) and the Nevada Center of Excellence today announced a unique partnership with China's foremost water research university to address global water pollution and supply issues.

Contact: Catherine Schell
cschell@dri.edu
702-862-5411
Desert Research Institute

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry
Colorimetric Determination of Lactate Dehydrogenase

A low-cost, simple, sensitive detection method of lactate dehydrogense (LDH) was developed on paper-based microwell arrays microfluidic device.

Contact: JI Xing-Hu
xhu@whu.edu.cn
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry
Green Synthesis of Fluorescent Carbon Quantum Dots for Detection of Hg2+

Fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) were synthesized by one-step hydrothermal treatment of apple juice.

国家自然科学基金(Nos. 21175118,21275130)

Contact: WANG Ai-Jun
ajwang@zjnu.cn
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Application of Modified Mesoporous Silica Materials for Analysis of Small Molecules by MALDI-TOF-MS

Mesoporous silica SBA-15 with a small organic molecular (1,8-Naphthalimide) was synthesized and used as matrix for MALDI-TOF-MS (Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) analysis.

Contact: Jin Biao
Jinbiao@ybu.edu.cn
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Science China:Life Sciences
Is it still necessary to pursue super high yields in rice production?

Super high rice yields require high inputs, which reduces profit, increases crop risk, and has environmental consequences. To achieve food security in China, new rice cropping systems that increase multi-cropping index and harvest frequency have to be developed. Such new cropping systems require mechanization and simplification of crop management practices and new rice varieties. This article has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences(In Chinese), 2014, No.8.

Special Fund for Agro-scientific Research in the Public Interest (No. 201203096) and Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University of China (IRT1247)

Contact: PENG Shaobing
speng@mail.hzau.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Academia Sinica, UC Davis sign agreement on exchanges and tech transfer

The University of California, Davis, and Academia Sinica, the preeminent academic institution in the Republic of China (Taiwan), have entered into a collaborative agreement to develop a unique educational and scientific exchange program that couples cutting-edge research with opportunities to translate innovative technologies and commercially relevant discoveries into new companies.

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Showing releases 51-75 out of 695 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 ]