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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 574 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 15-Aug-2015
Biomicrofluidics
Device may detect urinary tract infections faster

A Lab-on-a-Disc platform developed by a German and Irish team of researchers combines modern microfluidic techniques with fast optical diagnostics to dramatically cut the time to detect bacterial species that cause urinary tract infections -- a major cause of sepsis -- from 24 hours to within 70 minutes.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 15-Aug-2015
Journal of Chemical Physics
New benchmarks for molecular spectroscopy

Researchers at Tsinghua University in Beijing have recently used a technique called zero-kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy to obtain a list in unprecedented detail of the quantum energy levels of the cyanoacetylene cation, a linear, five-atom molecule that exhibits nuclear and electronic coupling effects and is found in interstellar clouds and in the atmosphere of Saturn's largest moon Titan. This work has significant implications for understanding the electronic structure of organic molecules.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 14-Aug-2015
Science
Evidence of learned vocalization in nonhuman primates

As nonhuman primates mature, their vocalizations are thought to be minimally or not at all influenced by caregivers – but a new study reveals that infant marmosets use cues from adults as they develop vocalizations. In a surprise twist, humans may not be the only primates whose vocal development benefits from early communication.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Aug-2015
Science
Exoplanet discovery from next-gen gemini planet imager

The recently commissioned Gemini Planet Imager has made its first exoplanet discovery: what may be the lowest-mass exoplanet ever directly imaged. The findings from this next-generation imaging tool pave the way toward a better understanding of how our solar system was formed.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Aug-2015
Science
Internal climate variability masks climate-warming trends

Amid climate change debates revolving around limited increases in recent global mean surface temperature (GMST) rates, Kevin Trenberth argues that natural climate fluxes – larger than commonly appreciated – can overwhelm background warming, making plateaued rates, or hiatuses, deceiving in significance. After many years of monitoring, it’s clear that the GMST can vary from year to year, even decade to decade; these differences, Trenberth argues, are largely a result of internal natural variability.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Aug-2015
Science
Opioid compounds synthesized from yeast

Following progress in identifying all components in the opioid pathway, researchers have been able to manipulate yeast to synthesize thebaine, a poppy opiate that is a precursor to many medically relevant opioids. The only current source of opioids, the most powerful medical substances available for treating pain, is the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum, making production reliant on poppy farming.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Monkeys exposed to SIV in the womb born more resistant to infection

A new study shows that monkeys exposed to simian HIV in the womb are better able to fight off infection after birth. The findings help shed light on the long-standing mystery of why relatively few pregnant women transmit HIV to their children, and may also improve design of vaccines to treat or prevent HIV infection.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Managing cropland vegetation and produce crop safety

A study finds that the widespread practice of clearing vegetation from crop margins may not reduce levels of pathogenic bacteria in produce crops as intended. Produce growers have been encouraged to clear noncrop vegetation from the margins of their cropland to discourage wildlife, which has been suggested as a vector of pathogens such as Escherichia coli that can contaminate produce.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Distinct gene sets underlie memory processes

Distinct genetic profiles might underlie specific mental processes of human episodic memory, according to a study. Memories of personal events and experiences, known as episodic memories, rely on distinct cognitive processes.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Collaboration and scientific career development

Strong, long-term scientific collaborations can benefit collaborators’ publication outputs and career development, according to a study. Scientists forge collaborations of varying length, strength, and productivity over the course of their careers.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that skin chemicals of Antarctic fur seal pups are similar to those of their mothers, that the number of chemical compounds found in adult seals correlates with allele status, and that subsets of compounds appear to encode genetic relatedness and distinguish seals from different colonies, suggesting that diverse genetic and environmental information can be chemically encoded.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Parasitic infection of amphibians

Recently identified parasites infect tadpoles globally, across tropical and temperate environments, a study reports. Emerging infectious diseases have been previously linked to declines in many amphibian populations.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
JAMA
In vitro fertilization using frozen eggs associated with lower live birth rates

Compared to using fresh oocytes (eggs) for in vitro fertilization, use of cryopreserved (frozen) donor oocytes in 2013 was associated with lower live birth rates, according to a study in the August 11 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Vitaly A. Kushnir, M.D.
mprobasco@thechr.com
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
JAMA
Prolonged episodes of respiratory disorder among extremely preterm infants associated with adverse outcomes

Among extremely preterm infants, prolonged episodes of hypoxemia (abnormally low levels of oxygen in the blood, which leads to shortness of breath) during the first 2 to 3 months after birth were associated with an increased risk of disability or death at 18 months, according to a study in the Aug. 11 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Christian F. Poets, M.D.
christian-f.poets@med.uni-tuebingen.de
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
China Science Bulletin
Sydnones, Münchnones and Montréalones: City-named compounds

Sydnones, münchnones and montréalones are interesting organic compounds that are named after the cities. A review published in CHINESE SCIENCE BULLETIN discusses the discovery, structures, properties and application of these compounds, which provides intriguing stories about chemists behind these city names.

NSFC supported program

Contact: Sun Huailin
sunhl@nankai.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 8-Aug-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Intraperitoneal chemotherapy shown to improve survival for patients with advanced ovarian cancer

Fewer than half of patients with ovarian cancer who could benefit from intraperitoneal chemotherapy—a technique for delivering chemotherapy directly into the abdomen—actually receive it, according to a new study by Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center (DF/BWCC) researchers.

Contact: John Noble
John_Noble@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Aug-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Two-drug combination boosts survival in metastatic prostate cancer

Newly diagnosed patients with metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer gained a dramatic survival benefit when started on two drugs simultaneously, rather than delaying the second drug until the cancer began to worsen, according to results of a clinical trial led by a Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientist.

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 7-Aug-2015
Science
Wealthy countries may feel flooding effects more in the future

Today, many wealthy countries are able to mitigate, to some degree, their risk of delta flooding through vulnerability-reducing investments, but a model that accounts for rising infrastructure costs suggests that this mitigation may not be sustainable in the long-term. Ultimately, wealthy countries could be feeling the strain of floods to a similar degree as developing countries in the future.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Aug-2015
Science
Gene deletions and duplications reveal our genetic storyline

By looking closely at the copy number variation across a vast number of populations, researchers now have a better idea of how selection affects the human genome around the globe. Copy number variation is the structural difference between genomes when large portions of DNA are duplicated or deleted.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Aug-2015
Science
Data from Nepal reveals the nature of megathurst earthquakes

As a devastating earthquake hit Nepal on April 25, 2015, nearby GPS networks for the first time continuously recorded measurements at very close distances during a large continental thrust earthquake. These data provide us with unique insights into megathrust earthquakes, which occur when two tectonic plates converge and one plate is forced underneath the other.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Aug-2015
Science
Vaccine offers protection against ebola virus 7 days before infection

In the face of the latest Ebola outbreak, some good news emerges: a preclinical study testing the efficacy of the VSV-EBOV (formerly known as rVSV/ZEBOV-GP) vaccine in nonhuman primates shows complete protection when administered 7 days before infection, and partial protection when administered 3 days before infection.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Aug-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Stroke therapy put to the test in preclinical randomized controlled trial

In the midst of what some call a “crisis” in the ability to replicate results of laboratory studies, a European consortium has conducted a preclinical randomized controlled trial (pRCT)—which mimics the design and rigorous standards of a clinical trial but is done in animals—and provides one more view of the drug’s efficacy before it is used in the clinical trial setting.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Probing the evolution of geological diagenesis and metallogenesis with terahertz wave

The fluid inclusion is important in mineral evolution research. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy has been used to probe the inclusion in the halite rock and the terahertz absorption coefficient can indicate the evolutionary regime of halite rock including early diagenetic phase, late diagenetic phase and approximate metamorphic phase, suggesting the terahertz technology is a non-destructive, contact-free tool to probe the evolution of geological diagenesis and metallogenesis.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405259)

Contact: BAO Rima
brm22@163.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Flight stability trade-offs in bumblebees

Bees laden with pollen on their hind legs may experience increased flight stability, but at the likely expense of maneuverability, according to a study. Because pollen and nectar loads carried by bumblebees can reach nearly half the insect’s weight, the placement of such loads on the bumblebee’s body can significantly affect the dynamics of flight.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
El Niño and salmon survival

Researchers report that the stability of Pacific salmon stocks has decreased in recent decades. Historically, changes in the survival of salmon populations in the northeast Pacific have been explained by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), a recurring pattern of changes in ocean conditions driven by El Niño-associated eastern Pacific warming.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 51-75 out of 574 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]