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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 646 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]

Public Release: 9-Jan-2015
Science
Treating buffalo for one infection helps spread another

Ridding individuals of parasitic worms, or helminths, may have unexpected negative consequences at the population level, researchers say. This finding is important, considering that large-scale treatment programs targeting human helminth infections are currently expanding around the globe.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Therapy can trick prostate tumors into reversing resistance

A strategy called bipolar androgen therapy can potentially help treat and, in some cases, reverse resistance in prostate cancer. Promising results from a pilot study could offer hope to patients with treatment-resistant prostate cancer. The primary treatment for the advanced stage of this disease is hormone therapy that starves tumors of androgen hormones, including testosterone.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Chinese Optics Letters
Novel laser energy gain media capable of 100-thousand-time amplification

Researchers in Prof. Xiaoyan Liang’s group, from Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, have conducted series of experiments on the CW and CWML oscillators based on Yb:SSO, and for the first time to the best of our knowledge, applied this crystal into the chirped pulse amplifier (CPA) to explore its potential as good amplification medium. It is reported in Chinese Optics Letters Vol.13, No.1 (2015).

Contact: Xiaofeng Wang
wxf@siom.ac.cn
Chinese Laser Press

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
JAMA
Scottish study finds substantially shorter life expectancy for patients with type 1 diabetes

For patients with type 1 diabetes in Scotland, at age 20 years, the average man has an estimated life expectancy loss of about 11 years; for women, it is 13 years, compared with the general Scottish population without type 1 diabetes, according to a study in the January 6 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Helen M. Colhoun, M.D.
h.colhoun@dundee.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
JAMA
Intensive treatment for type 1 diabetes associated with decreased risk of death

After an average of 27 years’ follow-up of patients with type 1 diabetes, 6.5 years of initial intensive diabetes therapy was associated with a modestly lower all-cause rate of death, compared with conventional therapy, according to a study in the January 6 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Trevor J. Orchard, M.D.
hydzikam@upmc.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
China Science Bulletin
Happy or unhappy? The brain may know

Recently, a study found that people with different happiness levels have different spontaneous brain activities when they were at rest. The findings provide insights into the relationship between happiness and brain. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin(In Chinese), 2015.

Key Research Institute of Humanities and Social Science Project of Chongqing

Contact: Huang XiTing
xthuang@swu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
DRG-derived SCs combined with PLGA/chitosan conduits for repair of sciatic nerve defects

Isolation and purification of Schwann cells (SCs) is complicated by contamination with fibroblasts. Current reported measures are mainly limited by either high cost or complicated procedures with low cell yields or purity.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Mice infected with rodent malaria parasites that are resistant to artemisinin, a common malaria drug extracted from the plant Artemisia annua, experienced reduced parasitic load when fed dried samples of the whole plant, and a non-artemisinin-resistant mouse malaria parasite species developed resistance to the whole plant treatment three times slower than to artemisinin.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Supporting young researchers

According to a Perspective, the average age of researchers receiving key National Institutes of Health grants is progressively rising, with potential implications for funding received by young researchers. Receiving an R01 grant awarded by the National Institutes of Health can be a prerequisite to a career as an independent biomedical investigator.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Producing Tourette-like symptoms in mice

Loss of large cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum, deep within the brain, may be associated with some symptoms of Tourette syndrome, according to a study. Although the underlying cause of Tourette syndrome is unclear, postmortem studies of people with severe disease found reduced cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Organic carbon flux in the oceans

A potential climate feedback mechanism may diminish a warming ocean’s capacity to sequester carbon from the atmosphere, a study suggests. Due to the solubility of gas in water, carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and surface-ocean mirror each other.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Symbiont influence on host ecology

A symbiotic, intracellular bacterium demonstrates the ability to influence the ecology of its host, according to a study. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, is a common agricultural pest that feeds on legume sap, but its survival depends on a symbiotic bacterium, Buchnera aphidicola, which synthesizes nutrients unavailable in plant sap.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Insecticide-treated bed nets and malaria mosquito adaptation

Use of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) to control malaria mosquitoes may have influenced how mosquitoes evolve tolerance to insecticides, according to a study. Two common West African malaria mosquitoes, Anopheles gambiae and A. coluzzii, are distinct species that periodically hybridize.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Temperature and susceptibility to rhinoviruses

The ability of rhinoviruses, which cause common cold and may trigger asthma, to replicate more efficiently in the nasal cavity than in the lungs might be related to temperature-dependent differences in antiviral immune responses, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Demographic trajectory of Rapa Nui on Easter Island

An analysis of obsidian artifacts from Easter Island suggests that prehistoric Rapa Nui society may not have collapsed prior to the arrival of European explorers in 1722, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
A healthy lifestyle may prevent heart disease in nearly 3 out of 4 women

WASHINGTON (Jan. 5, 2015) --A new study that followed nearly 70,000 women for two decades concluded that three-quarters of heart attacks in young women could be prevented if women closely followed six healthy lifestyle practices.

Contact: Rachel Cagan
rcagan@acc.org
202-375-6395
American College of Cardiology

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
CD93 and GIPC expression and localization during central nervous system inflammation

Previous studies have demonstrated that CD93 and GIPC have been shown to interactively alter phagocytic processes of immune cells.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix as a tissue engineered nerve scaffold

Bovine acellular dermal matrix can be made into a large amount of natural biological scaffolds with good biocompatibility and degradability for use in the field of neural regeneration.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 4-Jan-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Propofol and remifentanil affect NSC/NPC proliferation and differentiation

Intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) plays an important role as a signal transduction messenger during neural stem/progenitor cell (NSC/NPC) proliferation and differentiation and in the development of the central nervous system.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 4-Jan-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Age-dependent loss of cholinergic neurons and impaired learning in mice with TND

The tooth belongs to the trigeminal sensory pathway. Dental damage has been associated with impairments in the central nervous system that may be mediated by injury to the trigeminal nerve.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 3-Jan-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New version of common antibiotic could eliminate risk of hearing loss

On Christmas Eve, 2002, Bryce Faber was diagnosed with a deadly cancer called neuroblastoma. The 2-year-old's treatment, which, in addition to surgery, included massive amounts of radiation followed by even more massive amounts of antibiotics, no doubt saved his life. But those same mega-doses of antibiotics, while staving off infections in his immunosuppressed body, caused a permanent side effect: deafness.

Contact: Tracie White
traciew@stanford.edu
650-723-7628
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 2-Jan-2015
Science
Cholera toxin Aids gene swaps

The system that cholera uses to inject toxin into neighboring competitor cells is co-regulated by genes that prompt the bacterium to ingest and integrate new DNA into its genome, according to a study by Sandrine Borgeaud and colleagues.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Jan-2015
Science
Fat cells help fight infections in mice

Fat tissue plays a direct, protective role against bacterial infection, according to a new study in mice. These findings should be useful in investigating why obese and insulin-resistant individuals are more susceptible to bacterial infections, researchers say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Jan-2015
Science
Possible target against enterovirus revealed

Yue Liu and colleagues have revealed the crystal structure of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), and show how an antiviral compound might be able to stop it from infecting cells. EV-D68 caused a recent outbreak of mild to severe respiratory illness among children in the U.S., with more than 1000 confirmed cases since August 2014.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Jan-2015
Science
Is bad luck to blame for cancer-prone tissues?

Random mutations that occur in dividing healthy stem cells can explain the dramatic variation in cancer incidence among various human tissues better than hereditary or environmental factors, researchers say. This finding could help to explain why some tissues, such as lung, give rise to cancer far more frequently than other tissues, such as bone -- and it might also help researchers design more effective prevention strategies for different cancer types.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 351-375 out of 646 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]