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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 742 releases.
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Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
Science Translational Medicine
DNA blood test detects heart transplant rejection

A blood test that gauges differences in the circulating DNA of heart transplant recipients could be used to diagnose the likelihood of heart transplant rejection and reduce the need for costly and invasive heart biopsies (a procedure that involves removing heart muscle tissue for analysis). The findings could potentially reduce the number of biopsies that transplant patients undergo, eventually replacing the risky procedure with a simple blood test for monitoring organ rejection.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry
A new quartz crystal microbalance measuring method with expansive frequency range and broadband adaptive response capacity

Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as a new-type resonant mass meter reaches a nanogram-level precision and can be applied in both gas-phase and liquid-phase environments, thus receiving extensive attention from the academic field.

国家自然科学基金科学仪器基础研究专项(No. 21227008)资助

Contact: Mr. Bao
ybao@ciac.ac.cn
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
JAMA
Use of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease not associated with increased risk of cancer

In a study that included more than 56,000 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, use of a popular class of medications known as tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists was not associated with an increased risk of cancer over a median follow-up of 3.7 years, although an increased risk of malignancy in the long term, or with increasing number of doses, cannot be excluded, according to a study in the June 18 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Nynne Nyboe Andersen, M.D.
nyna@ssi.dk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
JAMA
Analysis finds mixed results for use of thrombolytic therapy for blood clot in lungs

In an analysis that included data from 16 trials performed over the last 45 years, among patients with pulmonary embolism, receipt of therapy to dissolve the blood clot (thrombolysis) was associated with lower rates of death, but increased risks of major bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage, according to a study in the June 18 issue of JAMA. The authors note that these findings may not apply to patients with low-risk pulmonary embolism.

Contact: Lee-Ann Donegan
Leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
IOF Regionals 5th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting
Osteoporosis International
Registration opens for key regional osteoporosis meeting to be held in Taipei City

Registration has opened for the 5th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting to be held at the Taipei International Convention Centre from November 14-16, 2014. The meeting programme features a broad range of clinical topics and regional research will be highlighted. http://www.iofbonehealth.org/taipei-2014

Contact: Sherman Lee
iofap@iofbonehealth.org
656-496-5508
International Osteoporosis Foundation

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Intracranial monitoring of 520 neurons within the hippocampus and amygdala of nine people engaged in memory tests suggests that episodic memories are encoded in the hippocampus by small groups of neurons rather than by a single neuron or by all hippocampal neurons, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate and migration in pre-Columbian Peru

Genetic evidence from Peru identifies periods of migration in pre-Columbian Andean societies possibly linked to changes in local climates, according to a study. Archaeologists previously identified climate as a possible factor driving cultural and population changes in pre-Columbian Andean civilizations, yet direct evidence of the demographic consequences of a changing climate was unavailable.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reconstructing the population dynamics of passenger pigeons

Researchers have reconstructed the population dynamics of extinct passenger pigeons and found that dramatic natural changes in population may have rendered the birds vulnerable to human influences and tipped them toward rapid extinction. Immense flocks of passenger pigeons (Ectopistes migratorius), which went extinct a century ago, once thronged the skies over eastern North America, their numbers reaching an estimated 3-5 billion in the 1800s.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Violent crime trials at London’s Old Bailey

Lexical trends in transcripts of London trials between 1760 and 1913 reveal a gradual decline in Western society's tolerance of violence, according to a study. To examine the evolution of the Western bureaucratic legal system during the 18th and 19th centuries, Simon DeDeo and colleagues examined transcripts of trial proceedings at London’s Central Criminal Court, also known as the Old Bailey, between 1760 and 1913.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Social spider behavior may influence division of labor

Spiders with different behavioral tendencies display different preferences and proficiencies for various tasks in a social colony, according to a study. Division of labor based on morphological or physiological characteristics of individuals within groups of social organisms is well-documented, but whether differences in behavioral tendencies influence the group tasks that individuals perform remains unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Continent-wide organic pollution in Europe’s freshwater systems

Organic chemicals such as pesticides and industrial chemicals may pose a continent-scale threat to freshwater ecosystems, according to a study. The threats posed by organic chemicals to freshwater organisms are well-known, but small-scale studies have examined the effects of organic pollutants only on stream and watershed scales.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Variation in journal access pricing across institutions

Bundled journal access agreements between journal publishers and research institutions display variability in pricing that cannot be explained by institution characteristics alone, according to a study. Although some publishers and libraries hold the details of such agreements confidential, Theodore C. Bergstrom and colleagues used Freedom of Information Act requests to examine agreements between public universities and both commercial and non-profit journal publishers.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry
Rapid identification of multiple bacteria on a microfluidic chip

We developed a microfluidic device to integrate sample introduction, bacteria culturing and results reading. The identification of multiple bacteria was achieved by combining the spatial resolution of the arrayed bacteria culture chambers and the color resolution benefited from the bacteria specific chromogenic media.

Contact: Dayu Liu
ruark@126.com
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Stem cells in neurodegeneration: challenges and future neurotherapeutic prospects

Neurodegenerative disorders cause irreversible damage to the brain and affect an increasing number of people worldwide. Although promising, the use of neuronal stem cells requires a better understanding of the process of neurogenesis. Various approaches have been used to control neurogenesis; however, all of these platforms presented major pitfalls. Therefore, an interesting future approach is to leverage the use of stem cell treatment and pharmacological agents such as ROCK inhibitors and growth factors to ameliorate neural deterioration.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
American Diabetes Association's 74th Scientific Sessions
Diabetes distress vs. depression: Are people with type 2 being misdiagnosed?

Researchers have long understood there is a strong association between diabetes and depression. But new research presented at the American Diabetes Association's 74th Scientific Sessions® shows that symptoms of depression in people with type 2 diabetes can be significantly reduced through interventions for "diabetes distress," suggesting that much of what is being labeled as depression may not be a co-morbid psychiatric disorder after all, but rather a reaction to living with a stressful, complex disease that is often difficult to manage.

Contact: Madison Trimble
mtrimble@diabetes.org
703-549-1500 x2139
American Diabetes Association

Public Release: 15-Jun-2014
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry
The analytical of PM2.5 in atmospheric fine particulate matter by GC/MS

Recently, the extraction of PAHs in particulates by temperature controlled ultrasonic extraction has been successfully applied to the determination of 24 kinds of PAHs in PM2.5, later we want to apply this pretreatment method to TSP, PM10 and other smaller size of particulate matter, and we also will try to use this method to extract other trace organic compounds in particulate matter.

Contact: Hongshuai Zhao, Baoxian Liu
zhs198069@163.com
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry

Public Release: 13-Jun-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Anti-dsDNA, surface-expressed TLR4 and endosomal TLR9 cooperate to exacerbate lupus

The study by Lee et al reveals that risk factors, pathogenic anti-dsDNA and combined activation of extracellular and intracellular TLRs, induce SLE syndromes in normal mice. Hence, ongoing studies will determine whether block anti-dsDNA, TLR4 and TLR9 can ameliorate lupus syndrome in lupus mice. Identification of molecular mechanisms contributing to lupus development by co-activation of surface-expressed TLR4 and endo-lysosomal of TLR9 will open new avenues for modulating immune tolerance and suppressing disease progression.

Natl Science Council, Ministry of Education; Department of Education & Research Taipei City Hospital

Contact: Kuang-Hui Sun
khsun@ym.edu.tw
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 13-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Rescue of Alzheimer's memory deficit achieved by reducing 'excessive inhibition'

A new drug target to fight Alzheimer's disease has been discovered by a research team led by Gong Chen, a Professor of Biology and the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences at Penn State University. The discovery also has potential for development as a novel diagnostic tool for Alzheimer's disease, which is the most common form of dementia and one for which no cure has yet been found.

National Institutes of Health and Penn State University's Eberly College of Science Stem Cell Fund.

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 13-Jun-2014
Science
Do fragmented forests open the door to diseases?

The results of a 12-year field study suggest that highly connected plant populations are more resistant to fungal pathogens than isolated populations. This finding, reported by Jussi Jousimo and colleagues, seems counterintuitive since conventional wisdom argues that closely clustered populations would make pathogen colonization easier rather than harder.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Jun-2014
Science
Anxious crayfish can be treated like humans

A new study in crayfish -- the freshwater crustaceans that look like miniature lobsters -- reveals that these crustaceans experience a primitive form of anxiety, which probably shares some evolutionary origins with the more developed human emotion. On top of that, a drug known as chlordiazepoxide (CDZ), which is used to treat anxiety in humans, can calm the crustaceans back down, researchers say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Jun-2014
Science
Fine-tooth comb on Mexico’s genetics for medical purposes

Researchers have pored over the genetics of the people of Mexico, and their fine-scale study -- the first of its kind in the region -- reveals how the genomes of modern Mexicans were shaped by population dynamics of ancient Native Americans, those that lived in the region before European colonization.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Jun-2014
Science
Dinosaurs -- not too fast, not too slow

Dinosaurs’ metabolic rates -- once thought to be slow, leaving these now-extinct animals to lumber across the landscape -- can’t be characterized as slow and ectothermic (reflecting an externally-regulated body temperature) or highly mobile and endothermic (with body temperatures regulated internally), a new study reports; instead, their metabolic rates fell somewhere in-between.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Lighting up tumors with phospholipid compounds

Radiolabeled, fluorescent phospholipid compounds designed in the lab can detect and track cancer spread, targeting even those cells that have been relatively resistant to current therapies, a new study reports.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
JAMA
Long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery shows greater rate of diabetes remission

In a study that included long-term follow-up of obese patients with type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery was associated with more frequent diabetes remission and fewer complications than patients who received usual care, according to a study in the June 11 issue of JAMA, a diabetes theme issue.

Contact: Lars Sjostrom, M.D., Ph.D.
lars.v.sjostrom@medfak.gu.se
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
JAMA
For patients receiving metformin to treat diabetes, addition of insulin associated with increased risk of death

Among patients with diabetes who were receiving metformin, the addition of insulin compared with a sulfonylurea (a class of antidiabetic drugs) was associated with an increased risk of nonfatal cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause death, according to a study in the June 11 issue of JAMA, a diabetes theme issue.

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
The JAMA Network Journals

Showing releases 351-375 out of 742 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ]