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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 563 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Agricultural water productivity and food trade in China

Compared with a nationwide policy, local policies to reduce irrigation water use in China’s water-scarce provinces may reduce national irrigation water consumption by 2030, a study suggests. Economic growth and a growing population in China place increasing pressure on the country’s water-intensive agriculture, which can lead to significant environmental degradation.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Human sex ratio during pregnancy

Contrary to previous reports, the human sex ratio is equal at conception and net female mortality exceeds that of males during pregnancy, according to a study. Steven Orzack and colleagues examined a broad data set to investigate the trajectory of the human sex ratio between conception and birth, a trajectory that remains poorly characterized.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Evaluating viral spillover into humans

Structural details of the interaction of a viral glycoprotein and a human cell-surface receptor might help evaluate the potential for spillover of African henipaviruses into humans, according to a study. More than a dozen groups of emerging pathogens called henipaviruses (HNV) have been detected in Africa, where fruit bats (Eidolon helvum), reservoirs of the related Asiatic Nipah virus, are a common sight near human settlements.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Neuronal activity during sleep

A study finds that sleep decreases neuronal activity in fruit flies, and that sleep deprivation can cause sleep-like neuronal effects while awake. Fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) share fundamental features of sleep with mammals, including a reduced ability to respond to external stimuli.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Recoding the dengue virus genome

Dengue virus (DENV) infects both insects and mammals, and a study finds that the DENV genome can be recoded to attenuate the virus in mammalian cells while maintaining normal growth in insect cells. Insects and mammals have evolved differences in how they encode proteins, and arthropod-borne viruses, or arboviruses, have evolved carefully balanced genomes that can efficiently use the protein-encoding machineries of both their insect and mammalian hosts.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Oceanic deoxygenation effects at the seafloor

According to a study, deoxygenation of seawater during past periods of climate change may have led to seafloor ecosystem reorganization that took more than 1,000 years to recover. Oceanic deoxygenation is a likely consequence of global warming and may expand marine oxygen minimum zones, which may in turn lead to reorganization of marine communities.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

An analysis of the evolutionary origin of transporters located in the membranes of photosynthetic organelles inside Arabidopsis thaliana cells suggest that the transporters may have originated in ancient protist ancestors that engulfed cyanobacteria, and that the translocation of the transporters from the host to the cyanobacteria endosymbiont may have helped establish a metabolic connection between the two organisms, enabling the evolution of early photosynthetic organisms, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Retinal neurons regeneration anatomically corelates with the eye vascular systems stem niches

Stem cells are undifferentiated cells which have the unique potential to self-renew and to supply, via intermediate stages of transit amplifying cells (TACs), differentiated cells. Within the stem cell niches not only heterologous cells, but also differentiated progeny of stem cells provide regulation to the stem cells parents. Stem cells can differentiate in various cell types during tissue maintenance or repair.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Prediabetes and type 2 diabetes implication in central proliferation and neurogenesis

Hyperinsulinemia and glucose intolerance, as features of Type 2 diabetes (T2D), might increase the neurodegeneration process, synaptic loss and brain atrophy, leading to cognitive impairment observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Nature Medicine
New molecular structures challenge conventional concepts of drug action at receptors

A team of Chinese and US scientists has determined the high-resolution atomic structure of a cell-surface receptor that plays a critical role in thrombosis, or blood clot, formation. This research unexpectedly discloses many new structural features, which challenge the conventional concepts of drug action at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and open a new door for future drug discovery.

The study was funded in part by the National Basic Research Program of China (grants 2012CB518000, 2014CB910400 and 2012CB910400), CAS Strategic Priority Research Program (XDB08020300), the National Science Foundation of China (grants 31422017, 31370729 a

Contact: Wu Beili
beiliwu@simm.ac.cn
0212-023-9065
Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
A dynamic simulation approach to support emergency decision making on urban public safety

Urban public safety emergencies, as reported, always result in enormous socio-economic cost. Regarding this, the practicability of studying these events by field experimentation is infinitesimal. Nevertheless, an alternative is proposed recently by a Chinese research team. It is a dynamic simulation approach to support emergency decision making on urban public safety. A paper on it has been published in 2015(3)issue of Scientia Sinica Terrae.

National High Technology Research and Development Program (No. 2013AA122302)

Contact: Gu Chaolin
gucl@tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
JAMA Pediatrics
An apple a day Won’t keep the doctor away but maybe the pharmacist

Turns out, an apple a day won’t keep the doctor away but it may mean you will use fewer prescription medications, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Contact: Laura Bailey
baileylm@umich.edu
734-647-1848
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
JAMA Pediatrics
Glyburide associated with more risk of adverse events than insulin in newborns

The medication glyburide, which has been increasingly used to treat gestational diabetes in pregnant women, was associated with higher risk for newborns to be admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit, have respiratory distress, hypoglycemia (low blood glucose), birth injury and be large for gestational age compared with infants born to women treated with insulin, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.

Contact: Michele Jonsson Funk,Ph.D.
dpesci@email.unc.edu
919-962-2600
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Can cinnamon bring aroma in Parkinson’s treatment?

Cinnamon, the brown bark of cinnamon tree, is one such natural compound that has already been being used for centuries throughout the world as spice or flavoring agent. In addition, medieval physicians used cinnamon for medical purposes to treat a variety of disorders including arthritis, coughing, hoarseness, sore throats, etc.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Delaying Alzheimer’s disease progression by improved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors

Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents a world-wide socio-economic burden with no cure and only limited treatment success. Despite tremendous research, the first line treatment are only the FDA-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Science
Mutation underlying severe flu identified

This study of a young French girl and her parents suggests that a recessive mutation that results in the loss of antiviral proteins known as interferons may be responsible for the rare but severe influenza that sometimes strikes children.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Science
Ice shelves thinning at Antarctica’s edges

After analyzing 18 years of satellite data, researchers suggest that the ice shelves around Antarctica have been thinning at accelerated rates for the past two decades, especially near the western edge of the continent. Their findings demonstrate that previous studies, which have generally relied on shorter, five-year satellite records, have not been representative of longer trends -- and it raises concern about how fast the global sea level could rise as climate continues to warm.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Science
Evaluating child abuse through generations

Amid debate about whether parents abused as youths are more likely to abuse their own children, a new study incorporating the perspectives of multiple generations reveals that part of what people believe to be the intergenerational transmission of abuse may be due to surveillance or detection -- specifically, bias targeted at parents who were abused themselves as children.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Science
Ebola virus not mutating as fast as feared

A new study suggests that the virus responsible for the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa is not mutating as quickly as earlier reports had suggested. This helps alleviate fears since a faster rate of mutation could have given the virus new properties that helped it spread more efficiently and resist current therapies.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
A UC3M patent can multiply mobile devices’ uploading speed by tenfold

A patent held by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) makes a jacket able to increase by tenfold the speed at which mobile devices can upload content. This is the MIMO HUB patent, which enables its jacket, in which numerous antennas are camouflaged, to connect to any mobile terminal in order to increase its data transfer speed, reduce its energy consumption and improve its reliability.

Contact: fjalonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Multiple facets of poly(ADP-Ribose) polymerase-1 in neurological diseases

The highly conserved abundant nuclear protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is activated by DNA damage. PARP-1 activation is associated in DNA repair, cell death and inflammation.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Death of spinal projecting neurons of the brain following spinal cord injury

New perspective article on the death of spinal projecting neurons of the brain following spinal cord injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Special issue: harnessing the immune system for therapy

This special issue of Science Translational Medicine captures the latest advances in immunotherapy, which harnesses the power of the immune system to treat human disease. A collection of three Perspectives, a Review, and a State of the Art Review tied together by a special Editorial examines the challenges and successes of this rapidly evolving field.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Biological conduit small gap sleeve bridging for peripheral nerve injury

It has shown that the clinical effects of 2-mm small gap sleeve bridging of the biological conduit to repair peripheral nerve injury are better than in the traditional epineurium suture, so it is possible to replace the epineurium suture in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury. However, the regeneration raw of nerve fibers in the biological conduit remains poorly understood.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Green tea polyphenols-pretreated nerve allografts for repair of peripheral nerve defects

Sheng-hu Zhou, Lanzhou General Hospital of Lanzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA, China and his colleagues recently found that sciatic nerve allograft pretreated with 1 mg/mL green tea polyphenols (GTP) at 4℃ was superior to irradiation-pretreated sciatic nerve allograft from the perspectives of functional and structural results in the repair of 1.0 cm-long sciatic nerve defect.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Showing releases 351-375 out of 563 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]