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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 648 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
The Olig family affects central nervous system development and disease

The oligodendrocyte transcription family (Olig family) is widely expressed in the central nervous system of various mammals, and plays a critical role in central nervous system development by controlling differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocytes, motor neurons and astrocytes.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Science China:Life Sciences
Bidirectional effect of Wnt signaling antagonist DKK1 on the modulation of anthrax toxin uptake

A recent research report that Dickkopf1 (DKK1) protein, a secreted LRP6 ligand and antagonist, is also a modulator of anthrax toxin sensitivity.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (30770465, 31070115), the National Basic Research Program of China (2010CB911800), and the Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences (to WenSheng Wei), and by an award (HDTRA1-06-C-0039) from the US Defense Thre

Contact: WEI WenSheng
wswei@pku.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
International Journal of Cancer
HSP90 inhibitor potentiates the activity of mTOR inhibitor against human breast cancer

The research group led by Prof. DING Jian in Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, CAS established the platform in an aim of discovery and research of mTOR kinase inhibitors.They found mTOR inhibition led to activation of upstream RTKs and AKT, which may attenuate the efficacy of mTOR kinase inhibitors. Combination therapy is a promising strategy to improve the efficacy of mTOR inhibitors.

National Natural Science Foundation of China and National Science & Technology Major Project “Key New Drug Creation and Manufacturing Program”

Contact: Linghua Meng
lhmeng@simm.ac.cn
Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Chinese Science Bulletin
Tetraradial symmetry in early poriferans

Sponges are among the simplest living animals, but exactly where they fit in the tree of life is poorly understood. Living sponges do not have clear symmetry, but new fossils from China show that at least some early sponges were tetraradially symmetric. This unexpectedly complex body structure supports genetic evidence that modern sponges are secondarily simplified animals, rather than extremely primitive.

Chinese Academy of Science and National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: LIN Jih-Pai
jplin@nigpas.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Examination of the earliest known pre-ceramic Neolithic mound site in Turkey, called Aşıklı Höyük, suggests that humans shifted their diet over a few hundred years from hunted wild ungulates and small animals to primarily sheep and goats that were held within settlement enclosures, and that breeding manipulations began by at least 8200 BC, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Importance of initial success

In a study of people competing for financial or social support in a variety of online forums, successes bestowed upon them arbitrarily increased the likelihood of later success. Individuals with similar competencies often experience different levels of success, but it is unclear whether these differences arise due to random chance or to subtle differences in each person’s innate abilities.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reconstructing the origin of the 1918 pandemic flu virus

A reconstruction of the 1918 pandemic flu virus that killed an estimated 50 million people suggests that childhood exposure of different age groups to different influenza virus variants may have been a key factor underlying the pandemic's unusual patterns of age-specific fatality.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Large mammal declines may increase risk of human disease

According to a study, ecosystems that suffer declines in large wildlife species experience rapid rodent population increases, and this may contribute to an increased risk of zoonotic disease.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Plant odor helps prepare neighbors against attack

When plants undergo an insect attack, they release airborne chemicals that can be picked up by healthy neighboring plants and converted to insecticidal compounds in preparation for an oncoming attack, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Human antibodies against MERS-CoV

Researchers have identified human antibodies that can hobble the binding of MERS-CoV to human cells, potentially paving the way for a protective vaccine or therapeutic antibody cocktail.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Estimating false conviction rates among death sentences

A study estimates the rate of false conviction among death-sentenced criminal defendants in the United States. When criminal courts convict an innocent defendant, the error is often unobserved and rarely identified subsequently.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Caribou hunting structure and artifacts found submerged in Lake Huron

Rock structures located on a ridge beneath Lake Huron display likely evidence of organized seasonal caribou hunting more than 9,000 years ago, according to a study. Lake Huron’s Alpena-Amberley Ridge, now submerged, provided a dry land bridge between Michigan and Ontario 9,000 years ago.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Factors influencing high and rising income inequality in China

National surveys reveal that income inequality in China outranks that in the United States and most other countries of the world and has increased at a rapid pace despite official reports that income inequality stopped growing nearly a decade ago.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
China Science Bulletin
An investigation about Pharmaceutical and personal care products in the surface water of China

In a recent paper, the researches of PPCPs in the surface water of China are summarized in the four aspects: occurrence, geographical distribution, main source, as well as transport and transformation. Based on that, the problems of the current studies and the prospective directions are discussed. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin (In Chinese), 2014, No.9.

National Natural Science Foundation (No.51208199), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2013T60429), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, the Foundation of State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Microorganism Applic

Contact: SUI Qian
suiqian@ecust.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
PLoS ONE
A system detects global trends in social networks two months in advance

A new method of monitoring identifies what information will be relevant on social networks up to two months in advance. This may help predict social movements, consumer reactions or possible outbreaks of epidemics, according to a study in the Universidad Carlos III of Madrid (UC3M) is participating.

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 27-Apr-2014
Chinese Science Bulletin
Lidar makes technical innovation of ecological parameters acquisition

As a novel active remote sensing technique, Lidar is able to characterize the 3-D forest structure with very high accuracy (centimeter or even millimeter level). It provides a revolutionary method for quantitative studies on ecosystems’ structure and pattern, and will play an important role in digitizing terrestrial ecosystems in the future. This study has been published on CHINESE SCIENCE BULLETIN(In Chinese), 2014, Vol. 59, No.6.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 31270563) National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB956600).

Contact: GUO Qinghua
qguo@ibcas.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 25-Apr-2014
Science China:Life Sciences
How does tree age influence damage and recovery in forests impacted by freezing rain and snow?

Does tree age influence damage and recovery in forests impacted by freezing rain and snow? A recent research found that vegetation damage and recovery showed tree age dependencies, which varied with tree shape, forest type, and damage type. Understanding this dependency will guide restoration after freezing rain and snow disturbances. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences(In Chinese), 2014, No.3.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 31030015 and 31300401) and the Forestry Science and Technology Innovative Foundation of Guangdong Province (2008KJCX012 and 2009KJCX015)

Contact: PENG Shaolin
lsspsl@mail.sysu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 25-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Quantitative volumetric analysis of the optic radiation in the normal human brain

The optic radiation is a dense fiber tract that emerges from the lateral geniculate nucleus and continues to the occipital visual cortex.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Apr-2014
Science
How carbon dioxide in the atmosphere affects carbon in the soil

As atmospheric carbon dioxide levels rise, the rate at which carbon in soils is decomposed by microbes (reverting back to carbon dioxide) increases, a new study reports. This suggests soils may not provide as much carbon storage in the future as had been suggested.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Apr-2014
Science
The genetic differences between prehistoric farmers and foragers

How did Stone-Age hunter-gatherers make the switch to agriculture in Europe? It’s a question that has split population geneticists for years, with some citing migration as the driving factor and others citing cultural diffusion.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Apr-2014
Science
Tsetse fly genome could help combat sleeping sickness

The newly sequenced genome of the tsetse fly, which spreads the protozoan parasites that cause trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in livestock) throughout sub-Saharan Africa, sheds new light on these unique insects and provides a foundation for research into the deadly disease.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Apr-2014
Science
Why so bright -- solving the puzzle of a superluminous supernova

An exceptionally bright supernova is so luminous, a new study reports, because a lens in front of it amplifies its light. The discovery of the lens settles an important controversy in the field of astronomy.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Cochlear implant gets an upgrade with gene therapy

Boosting the effectiveness of cochlear implants with gene therapy may one day allow people with varying degrees of deafness to experience more sophisticated aspects of sound, like differentiating the tonal color among instruments, such as the tinkling of a triangle or the mellow notes of a piano.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Chinese Medical Journal
A double-blinded RCT of αEEG-guided TMS for obsessive–compulsive disorder

Abnormal brain bioelectric activities were found in patients with OCD. The researchers of Sixth Hospital of Peking University administrated a personalized rTMS set at individual’s intrinsic frequency of alpha EEG over dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex bilaterally to treat patients with OCD. The results showed that αEEG-guided TMS may be an effective treatment for OCD and related anxiety. Delayed response to αTMS in depression suggests that it might be secondary to the improvement in primary response.

Contact: Anne Liu
liuhuanxy@cma.org.cn
Chinese Medical Journal

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Chinese Medical Journal
Diabetic patients in China should pay more attention to self-monitoring of blood glucose

The current state of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients in China investigated by Chinese diabetes education status survey study group showed that SMBG adherence in our Chinese population with T2D was less frequent than in developed countries. Participants showing SMBG adherence had significantly lower levels of blood glucose than those who did not. Several factors influence SMBG adherence: gender, education level, income, T2D duration, therapy regimen and exposure to education about SMBG.

Contact: Anne Liu
liuhuanxy@cma.org.cn
Chinese Medical Journal

Showing releases 351-375 out of 648 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]