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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 591 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 ]

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
China Science Bulletin
Geographic distribution of wild Orchidaceae in China

China has the richest Orchidaceae species diversity in the world, and all orchid species are in the list of conservation. A recent study aimed to identify the hotspots of wild orchids concentration distribution in China, which provide important basis for how to protect the resources. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin, 2015, No.2.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 31100392).

Contact: Zhang Yinbo
zhangyinbo@sxu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
nanostructure fabrication using FIB-grown free-standing metallic wires with rapid thermal annealing

3D metallic nanostructures have attracted intensive attention recently. By fabricating nanowires with compositional or microstructural nonuniformity across the width direction of a wire, thermal annealing-induced shape modification has been explored to achieve a desired style out of the strain-induced out-of-plane shape manipulation of free-standing nanostructures. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy, 2015, Issue 4.

Outstanding Technical Talent Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91123004, 11104334, 50825206, 10834012 and 60801043)

Contact: LI Wuxia
liwuxia@iphy.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Advances of alternating EM field for earthquake monitoring in China

Since the 1966 when Xingtai earthquake in Hebei province occurred, the significant development has been made for the alternating EM field technique in earthquake monitoring and prediction. The control source extremely low frequency (CSELF) and satellite EM technologies emerged with new progress of their data processing and data mining, and mark the latest advances in this area. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences(In Chinese), 2015, No.1.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41374077, 41074047), CEA-NASCC Dragon Project III (Grant No. 10671), and Special Public Benefit Program for Earthquake Study (Grant No. 200808010)

Contact: ZHAO Guoze
zhaogz@ies.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
How to discriminate oil and gas underground with seismic data?

Study on seismic fluid identification driven by rock physics has proved to be rewarding in recognizing the fluid feature and distributed regularity of the oil/gas reservoirs. The key scientific problems immersed in seismic fluid identification and the main progress of seismic fluid identification driven by rock physics domestic and overseas were reported recently. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences(In Chinese), 2015, No.1.

National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2013CB228604) and National Grand Project for Science and Technology(2011ZX05030-004-002)

Contact: YIN Xingyao
xyyin@upc.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
Science
Trace minerals strengthen tooth enamel

Trace minerals such as magnesium and iron that are found between grains in tooth enamel can dramatically influence enamel strength and acid resistance, according to Lyle Gordon and colleagues.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
Science
A live look at active neurons

Researchers have developed a way to take snapshots of active neurons in the brains of live organisms, including zebrafish, flies, and mice. Similar techniques have not been able to mark large populations of active neurons at specific moments in time.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
Science
New mammal fossils show off early diversity

Two new fossil discoveries from the middle to late Jurassic Period (between 170 and 145 million years ago) show that mammals had adapted to a wide variety of environmental niches even at this early stage in their evolution.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
Science
Plastic in the ocean – sources and solutions

Between five to 13 million tons of plastic waste wind up in the world’s oceans every year, and researchers warn that this amount could increase tenfold in the next decade unless the international community improves its waste management practices.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Transcriptomics Identifies Genes & Signaling Pathways That May Regulate Neurodegeneration

Neuronal death is a normal feature of brain development but also a defining feature of neurodegenerative diseases when improperly regulated. Results of a detailed and comprehensive analysis of transcriptome expression alterations during neuronal death have been reported. A large number of genes previously not linked to neuronal death were identified in the study. Although further functional analyses are needed, some of these genes may be important players in the regulation of neuronal death and represent potential targets for the development of novel therapies.

NIH, R01 NS040408

Contact: Dr. Santosh R. D'Mello
sdmello@smu.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Cancer’s glutamine addiction exposes brain tumors

An imaging technique exploits tumors’ addiction to glutamine to detect brain tumors, which was demonstrated successfully in a clinical trial of glioma patients.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
JAMA
For Patients with type 2 diabetes, blood pressure-lowering treatment linked to longer survival, lower risk of CVD events

Blood pressure-lowering treatment among patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and heart disease events and improved mortality, according to a study in the February 10 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Maya Kay
mkay@georgeinstitute.org.au
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
JAMA
Iron spplementation improves hemoglobin recovery time following blood donation

Among blood donors with normal hemoglobin levels, low­dose oral iron supplementation, compared with no supplementation, reduced the time to recovery of the postdonation decrease in hemoglobin concentration in donors with low or higher levels of a marker of overall iron storage (ferritin), according to a study in the February 10 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Jim Fitzgerald
jfitzgerald@itxm.org
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Stressed' young bees could be the cause of colony collapse

Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) is a major threat to bee colonies around the world and affects their ability to perform vital human food crop pollination. It has been a cause of urgent concern for scientists and farmers around the world for at least a decade but a specific cause for the phenomenon has yet to be conclusively identified.

Contact: Will Hoyles
w.hoyles@qmul.ac.uk
07-772-512-519
Queen Mary, University of London

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Honey bee social dynamics and colony collapse

Early foraging behavior in honey bees linked to environmental stressors may lead to a breakdown of social dynamics among bees and result in colony collapse, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Transplanting bovine adrenal cells

A study in rodents finds that bovine adrenocortical cells encased in alginate may serve as a transplantable treatment for adrenal insufficiency.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Extinction pressures on Australian mammals

Australian mammalian fauna are declining at a higher rate than mammals in most regions of the world, likely due to predation by introduced species, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Converting solar energy into liquid fuel

Researchers have devised a system that uses bacteria to convert solar energy into a type of liquid fuel, according to study. Although sunlight represents Earth’s most abundant source of renewable energy, storing solar energy has proven challenging.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study in mice reveals that fluctuations in locomotion activity patterns increase with lack of exercise and that lack of exercise is equally detrimental to young and aging mice, but high levels of exercise restore healthy, low-fluctuation activity patterns in both young and old mice.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Self-regulating insulin molecule

Researchers report a soluble, circulating, glucose-sensing insulin derivative that achieves efficient blood glucose control in mice. Though self-administered insulin can help regulate blood glucose levels in people with diabetes, it can potentially endanger lives by inducing hypoglycemic shock.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Flood erosion in an Icelandic canyon

Large-scale flooding can play a dominant role in landscape evolution despite its short duration, according to a study. Edwin R.C. Baynes and colleagues used topographic analysis and surface exposure dating to investigate the effects of extreme floods on the Jökulsárgljúfur canyon in northeast Iceland.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Pre-industrial air pollution in South America

Mining activities in South America generated air pollution approximately 240 years before the Industrial Revolution, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Feb-2015
New method to understand steel fracturing

Researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have visualized step-by-step and on a microscopic level how certain steels fracture when extreme loads are applied to them. This could help to improve these materials, which are used in the automobile industry.

Contact: fjalonso
fjalonso@bib.uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 7-Feb-2015
GSA Today
Ancient deformation of the lithosphere revealed in eastern China

Seismic investigations from the Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt in eastern China suggest that this region was affected by extreme mantle perturbation and crust-mantle interaction during the Mesozoic era. The Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt formed through the collision between the North and South China blocks, which produced large-scale destruction of the cratonic lithosphere, accompanied by widespread magmatism and metallogeny.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 6-Feb-2015
Science
California’s map of entrepreneurial quality

By focusing on the quality of start-up businesses rather than the quantity of start-ups in a given area, Jorge Guzman and Scott Stern have built a new map of entrepreneurial “hotspots” in California. The method offers a new way of defining and locating entrepreneurship, which could in turn help economists and politicians better promote entrepreneurism as a way to boost economic and social health.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Feb-2015
Science
Glacial cycles connected to production of ocean crust

A new analysis of the ocean floor across the Australian-Antarctic ocean ridge suggests that some glacial cycles are connected to the production of ocean crust, according to a new study by John Crowley and colleagues

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 351-375 out of 591 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 ]