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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 543 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 5-Mar-2016
Cell Stem Cell
Likely biological link found between Zika virus, microcephaly

Working with lab-grown human stem cells, a team of researchers suspect they have discovered how the Zika virus probably causes microcephaly in fetuses. The virus selectively infects cells that form the brain’s cortex, or outer layer, making them more likely to die and less likely to divide normally and make new brain cells.

佛罗里达州立大学; 美国国立卫生研究院过敏与感染研究所(资助号AI119530和AI111250),美国国立卫生研究院神经疾病与中风研究所(资助号NS048271,NS095348和NS047344)及马里兰州干细胞研究基金

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 4-Mar-2016
Science
Neural connectivity dictates altruistic behavior

A new study identifies neural fingerprints in the brain associated with altruism, where the alignment of neural networks may dictate a person’s alignment with selfish or altruistic behavior.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Mar-2016
Science
Data sharing facilitates transparency and reproducibility

For cultural, technical, and financial reasons, the field sciences have lagged behind many of the laboratory sciences in making data from individual studies available to the broader research community -- but it is time for this to change, Marcia McNutt, Brian Nosek and colleagues emphasize in this Policy Forum.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Mar-2016
Science
'Octopus-like' skin can stretch, sense and emit light

Researchers have developed an artificial skin that can stretch, sense pressure and emit light, showing a level of multi-functionality seen in the skin of some cephalopods, such as octopuses.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Mar-2016
Science
How well do laboratory experiments in economics replicate?

In a study aiming to replicate laboratory experiments published in high-impact economics journals, researchers reproduced original results in 61% of cases.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Nano Research
Radio frequency transistors based on ultra-high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes

This paper reports polyfluorene-separated ultra-high purity semiconducting carbon nanotube radio frequency transistors with a self-aligned T-shape gate structure. These transistors showed excellent direct current and radio frequency performance. Transconductance up to 40 μS/μm, small-signal output resistance greater than 200 kΩ•μm, extrinsic current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 22 GHz and record extrinsic maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) of 19 GHz were achieved.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
The world’s first internally motorized minimally invasive surgical robotic system

To minimize surgical trauma and improve the safety of current robotic surgery, an innovative project to develop a novel surgical robotic system (NSRS) with haptic (tactile) feedback and capable of single incision or natural orifice (incision-less) robotic surgery has been developed.

Contact: Hailey Lai
hailey.lai@polyu.edu.hk
852-340-03853
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Nano Research
Remarkable anodic performance of lead titanate 1-D nanostructures via in-situ irreversible formation of abundant Ti3+ as conduction pathways

As anode material for LIBs, PX-phase PT nanowires with open channels through the length direction deliver an excellent stabilized reversible specific capacity and superior high-rate performance. The good performance can be attributed to the formation of a uniform composite structure composed of Pb nanoparticles and amorphous TiO2, accompanied by production of abundant Ti3+, which simultaneously improves the ionic and electronic conductivity and structural stability of the system.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Nano Research
In situ development of highly concave and composition-confined PtNi octahedra with high oxygen reduction reaction activity and durability

We reported the one-step synthesis of single-crystal PtNi octahedra with in situ-developed highly concave features and self-confined composition. It exhibited outstanding activity and stability for oxygen reduction reaction. The performance was closely related to its highly unique concave morphology and self-confined composition.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Society for General Microbiology’s 161st Meeting
Science
Compound stems damage from brain bleeding

A compound that blocks iron-containing enzymes in the brain improves recovery following brain hemorrhage, a new study in rodents shows, and it works in an unexpected way.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Female fertility is dependent on functional expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase itch

Protein ubiquitination is known to result in its proteasomal degradation or to serve as a signal for tissue-specific cellular functions. Here it is reported that mice with a mutant form of the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH display reduced litter sizes due to a maternal effect. Mutant females had decreased numbers of implantations, corpa lutea, and extended estrous cycles. The results indicate for the first time that loss of functional ITCH disrupts female reproduction.

The Ctr for Molecular & Cell Toxicology, NIH/NIEHS, NSF/IGERT

Contact: Dr. John H. Richburg
john.richburg@austin.utexas.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Subcutaneous insulin therapy fails to protect against oxidative stress and inflammation

Today, the gold standard for insulin therapy is the subcutaneous injection of insulin (CSII), despite a non-physiological route of administration with suboptimal glycaemic control showed in some patients. Inability of CSII therapy to prevent inflammation and oxidative stress was firstly demonstrated in vivo on treated-diabetic rats, presenting a high variability of glycogen storage associated with glycaemic fluctuations. This study suggests that targeting oxidative stress and/or inflammation could help the therapeutic management of diabetic patients.

Contact: Dr. Severine Sigrist
s.sigrist@ceed-diabete.org
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Nuclear export of opioid growth factor receptor is CRM1 dependent

The opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) interacts with a specific opioid growth factor ligand (OGF), chemically termed [Met5]-enkephalin, to maintain homeostasis in a wide variety of normal and abnormal cells and tissues. The mechanism underlying the function of OGFr requires that the receptor translocates to the nucleus. However, the mechanism of nuclear export of OGFr is unknown. Studies utilizing both endogenous OGFr, and exogenously expressed OGFr-eGFP, demonstrated that OGFr is exported from the nucleus in a CRM1 dependent manner.

The Shockey Family Foundation

Contact: Dr. Patricia McLaughlin
pxm9@psu.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Experimental Biology and Medicine
A human liver microphysiology platform for studying physiology, drug safety, and disease

Currently available animal and human liver models provide limited predictions of human drug efficacy and toxicity, primarily due to metabolic differences and the limited ability of simple 2-D models to recapitulate the complex cellular interactions that lead to toxicity. To fill this gap we have developed a novel 4 cell type, 3-D, microfluidic, human liver model with the ability to monitor multiple cellular toxicity and human disease related functions over at least 28 days.

NIH

Contact: Dr. Lawrence A. Vernetti
vernetti@pitt.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Nano Research
Silver nanowires with semiconducting ligands for low-temperature transparent conductors

We have successfully exchanged the insulating PVP ligands that normally surround as synthesized AgNWs with shells of more conductive SnO2 nanoparticles. The resulting nanowire/nanoparticle mixtures allow for the deposition of nanocomposite films that require no other post-treatments to function as high quality transparent electrodes applied in a-Si solar cells. The ligand management strategy could potentially be useful in numbers of material systems that suffer from highly insulating materials that reside on the surface of nano/microstructures.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
JAMA
Physicians with highly educated spouse less likely to work in rural underserved areas

In a study appearing in the March 1, 2016 issue of JAMA, Douglas O. Staiger, Ph.D., of Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., and colleagues examined the prevalence of physicians with highly educated spouses and whether having such a spouse was associated with working in rural underserved areas.

Contact: Amy Olson
Amy.D.Olson@dartmouth.edu
603-646-3274
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
JAMA
Study compares effectiveness of insulin regimens for patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes

In a study appearing in the March 1, 2016 issue of JAMA, John B. Buse, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, and colleagues compared the outcomes of once-daily injection of basal insulin (glargine) vs a once-daily injection of the combination of basal insulin degludec and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
984-974-1915
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
JAMA
Severe anemia associated with increased risk of serious intestinal disorder among VLBW infants

Ravi M. Patel, M.D., M.Sc., of the Emory University School of Medicine & Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, and colleagues examined whether red blood cell transfusion and severe anemia were associated with the rate of necrotizing enterocolitis (an acute, life-threatening, inflammatory disease occurring in the intestines of premature infants) among very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants. The study appears in the March 1, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Melva Robertson
melva.robertson@emory.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Science China:Life Sciences
A new evolutionary hypothesis solving the 'matrilineal puzzle' in human societies

Human families are very diverse, showing a wide range of residence patterns, among them 17% are matrilineal societies. The evolution of matrliny is a puzzle, it is not clear why males tolerate a system that favours investment in their sister’s rather than their own offspring. Based on evolutionary theories, scientists suggested a new hypothesis for a matrilineal bias in male investment, which is that working for sisters can evolve when female kin breed communally.

‘Hundred Talents Program’ of the Chinese Academy of Sciences;National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC31270439, 11471311);The British Academy (IPM120180);European Reseach Concil (AdG249347)

Contact: TAO Yi
Yitao@ioz.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Nano Research
Small-sized tungsten nitride anchoring into a 3-D CNT-rGO framework as a superior bifunctional catalyst for the methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions

A fancy 3-D WN/CNT-rGO hybrid has been constructed. The advantages of hybrid, including the good contact of Pt and WN is favorable to develop the synergistic effect between Pt and WN, good conductivity for fast charge-transfer and larger, accessible pores for easy mass-transfer, make the material large potential as promising materials for the catalytic application.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
BioScience
Nitrogen is a neglected threat to biodiversity

Nitrogen pollution is a recognized threat to sensitive species and ecosystems. However, the means and severity of the damage are elusive, hampering efforts to manage this worldwide contaminant.

Kearney Foundation for Soil Science

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@gmail.com
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

According to a study of 64 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, the endocannabinoid palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) reduced the desensitization of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors to repeated ACh applications in muscle membranes from ALS patients, and patients treated with PEA exhibited slower decay of respiratory function than untreated patients.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Chondrule formation in the early Solar System

Researchers report isotopic evidence for how chondrules formed. Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules that are a major component of a class of meteorites called chondrites.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Food safety risk from Fukushima accident

Marine species currently face a low risk of contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident, a study finds. Earthquake and tsunami damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 released large quantities of radioisotopes into the atmosphere and the Pacific Ocean.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Market-driven regulations and deforestation

Researchers report that voluntary, market-driven agreements between corporations and environmental nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) can help reduce deforestation.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 351-375 out of 543 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]