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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 525 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences
In situ study of the mechanical properties of airborne haze particles

By employing a state-of-the-art in situ micromechanical testing method, for the first time, the mechanical properties of individual haze particles were quantitatively investigated. The authors demonstrated that a significant fraction of haze particles are hard enough to generate abrasive damage on frequently used industrial alloys, and therefore call on appropriate preventive measures to be taken immediately (if not yet) to guard against the potential abrasive damages from haze particles.

The National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51231005, 51471128, and 51321003);973 Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB619402),etc.

Contact: SHAN Zhiwei
zwshan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Science Bulletin
The codes of matter and their applications

A research published in 2015(19) issue of Science Bulletin proposed that the three paramount and ubiquitous attributes, charge (Q), spin (S) or rotational motion, and linear motion (K) are the original codes of matter, and they can be used to produce more codes, which are encoded in all the complicated forms of matter/materials/entities/objects and their properties.

Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (Professorial) Program (FT130100778)

Contact: Wang Xiao-Lin
xiaolin@uow.edu.au
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that the polysaccharide chitosan, coated with the neural growth factor neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), stimulated differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells into neurons and formation of functional neural networks in transected spinal cords of rats, connecting the severed nerves and restoring motor function, suggesting that NT-3-chitosan might be useful for treating spinal cord injury.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Risks of submergence from committed sea levels

While many communities face threats from global sea level rise, many may be spared from the risk of becoming mostly submerged, depending on future carbon emissions, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Prenatal cannabinoid exposure

During pregnancy in mice, transient exposure of the fetus to a major ingredient of marijuana affects neuronal development and fine motor control by blocking a cannabinoid receptor, a study suggests.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Organic compounds in Marcellus Shale groundwater

A study finds that surface spills, and not subsurface migration pathways, are likely sources of diesel-range organic compounds detected in groundwater above the Marcellus Shale.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Impact of ebola control measures in Sierra Leone

A major local and international response that introduced thousands of Ebola treatment beds to Sierra Leone may have been responsible for a substantial decline in Ebola virus disease (EVD) transmission during 2014-2015, a study reports.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Asian monsoon in a warming climate

Indicators of past trends in the East Asian summer monsoon belt suggest that the belt may move northward due to climate change, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Woody liana vines and tropical carbon storage

Woody vines, called lianas, may reduce biomass growth in tropical forests and alter the capacity of forests to store terrestrial carbon, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Visual perception and psychosis

A study finds that a shift in balance related to visual perception that favors prior knowledge over sensory input may be a characteristic of psychosis and psychosis proneness.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
JAMA
Benefit of early physical therapy for low-back pain appears modest

Early physical therapy for recent-onset low back pain resulted in statistically significant improvement in disability compared to usual care, but the improvement was modest and did not achieve a difference considered clinically important at the individual patient level, according to a study in the October 13 issue of JAMA .

Contact: Libby Mitchell
libby.mitchell@hsc.utah.com
801-587-0945
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
JAMA
Nonmedical prescription opioid use disorders, frequency of use and deaths increase in the U.S.

From 2003-2013, the percentage of nonmedical use of prescription opioids decreased among adults in the U.S., while the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorders, frequency of use, and related deaths increased, according to a study in the October 13 issue of JAMA .

Contact: Bradford Stone
Bradford.Stone@SAMHSA.hhs.gov
240-276-2140
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 10-Oct-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Materials
Synthesis of magnetic hollow carbon nanospheres with superior microporosity for adsorption of Cr(VI)

Hexavalent chromium is of high global environmental concern due to its high solubility in water, toxicity, non-biodegradation and its tendency to accumulate in living organisms. A recent research reported a simple and efficient strategy for the synthesis of magnetic hollow carbon spheres with superior microporosity by using zinc species as dynamic molecular porogens.

The National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: An-Hui Lu
anhuilu@dlut.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 10-Oct-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Materials
The formation of intracellular nanoparticles correlates with cisplatin resistance

Patients treated with the cisplatin often develop strong resistance to the drug after prolonged treatments, ultimately resulting in limited clinical efficacy.A recent study reported for the first time the presence of platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) in the cytoplasm of cells treated with cisplatin. Further analysis also evidenced a correlation of the increased intracellular Pt- NPs formation with cisplatin resistance, and confirmed the process was glutathione S-transferase relevant.

the National Key Basic Research Program of China (2011CB933503), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) for Key Project of International Cooperation (61420106012), the Special Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China For Basi

Contact: Gu Ning
Guning@seu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 9-Oct-2015
Nano Research
Room-temperature tracking of chiral recognition process at the single-molecule level

The molecular-level identification of a chiral recognition process of phthalocyanine (PC) has been tracked on a Cu(100) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). STM observations revealed that a chiral Pc molecule recognizes another Pc molecule with the same chirality to form a stable homochiral dimer via the formation of a series of metastable dimer configurations. The particular adsorption geometries of chiral dimers play the critical role in the mechanism of such chiral recognition.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 9-Oct-2015
Experimental Biology and Medicine
D&R: a new adipogenic cocktail that produces functional adipocytes from MSCs

Multipotent mesechymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been recognized as a source of adipocytes both in vivo and in vitro. It is reported that, simultaneous activation of canonical signaling pathways by dexamethasone through the glucocorticoid receptor and CCAAT-enchancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) and rosiglitazone through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-gamma), is sufficient for inducing adipogenic differentiation from MSCs, producing functional adipocytes.

Direccion de Investigacion, Universidad del Desarrollo

Contact: Dr. David Contador
dcontador@udd.cl
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 9-Oct-2015
Science
The law of the landscape for glaciers?

Fast glaciers are much more effective at gouging landscapes than slow-moving ones, a new study finds. The results may explain a phenomenon that has long puzzled scientists – why long-term erosion rates from glaciers are so much lower in Polar Regions, where glaciers move more slowly.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Oct-2015
Science
Evidence for long-lasting lakes on Mars

New data from the Curiosity rover reveals that a transient water system of deltas and lakes once dominated the landscape at Mars’s Gale crater.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Oct-2015
Science
Math app adds up for families anxious about math

Math is a notoriously tricky subject, but a new study providing elementary school children with a math-based app at home significantly improved their performance within a matter of months.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Oct-2015
Science
New genome reveals higher eurasian migration into ancient Africa

In light of one of the first successful cases of sequencing the full genome of an ancient African, it’s now clear that current African populations harbored significantly more Eurasian ancestry than previously thought, reshaping the way we interpret human history.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Genomic sequencing advances early diagnosis of hard-to-detect blood cancer

High-throughput genomic sequencing may offer a valuable tool for diagnosing patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), a hard-to-detect blood cancer that is often mistaken for benign skin conditions like eczema or dermatitis.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Osteoporosis International
Nutritional needs for skeletal health change as you age, says new scientific review

The review summarizes the latest evidence relating to the nutritional needs of mothers, children and adolescents, adults and seniors, in relation to developing and maintaining a healthy skeleton. Placing particular emphasis on calcium, vitamin D and protein, it shows how adequate nutritional intake of these and other micronutrients can support the primary objectives for good bone health

International Osteoporosis Foundation

Contact: Rhonda Ng
RNg@iofbonehealth.org
656-496-5508
International Osteoporosis Foundation

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Although people with Hodgkin’s lymphoma are sometimes unresponsive to treatment or experience relapse, a study finds that a monoclonal antibody, daclizumab, can target the immune receptor CD25.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Plant colonization of ancient Earth

The most recent common ancestor of all living land plants carried a preexisting adaptation that likely allowed it to interact with beneficial fungi and eventually take root on Earth’s barren surface, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Paper mulberry and ancient Pacific migrations

A study traces the origin of the Austronesian settlers of Oceania by tracing the genetic origin of the crops that the settlers brought with them

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 351-375 out of 525 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]