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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 739 releases.
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Public Release: 4-Jul-2014
Science
Disposing of wastewater linked to Oklahoma earthquakes

Some of the recent surge in earthquake activity in central Oklahoma is likely a result of the disposal of wastewater generated during oil and gas extraction processes at a small number of highly-active state wells, a new study reports. Earthquakes can be induced by industrial processes.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Drug reduces asthma attacks, allergies

An experimental drug called quilizumab may reduce asthmatic and allergic symptoms in patients by lowering levels of an inflammatory protein called immunoglobulin type E (IgE). The early-stage clinical trials suggest that the drug could one day be an effective treatment option for the millions of people suffering from severe asthma or allergies.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Analysis of the Chinese facial profile: contour of the side face in Tu and Zang ethnic minorities

This study uses geometirc morphometric method to analyze the contour of the side face and its variations in Tu and Zang (Tibetan) ethnic minorities from Qinhai province. The forehead both witnesses small variations and the nose has large variation, and one can roughly set the males apart from the females. These similarities may reflect the common morphological features of the Chinese face. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin (In Chinese), 2014, No.16.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (41102015), the Projects from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA05130102)

Contact: LI Haijun
Lindavy@163.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
JAMA
Drug everolimus does not improve overall survival in patients with advanced liver cancer

Despite strong preclinical data, the drug everolimus failed to improve overall survival in patients with advanced liver cancer, compared to placebo, according to a study in the July 2 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Katie Marquedant
KMarquedant@mgh.harvard.edu
617-726-0337
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
JAMA
Bone marrow transplantation shows potential for treating adults with severe sickle cell disease

Use of a lower intensity bone marrow transplantation method showed promising results among 30 patients (16-65 years of age) with severe sickle cell disease, according to a study in the July 2 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Krysten Carrera
krysten.carrera@nih.gov
301-435-8112
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Bulletin of the World Health Organization
Millions in need of HIV services will continue to be left out

Millions of people in need would benefit from HIV services in developing countries that are moving towards universal health coverage if these services were run more efficiently and integrated better into their health systems.

UNAIDS

Contact: Fiona Fleck
fleckf@who.int
41-227-911-897
Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Surveying the metagenomics of coral-associated microbiomes

A large-scale metagenomics survey of coral reef-associated microbial communities demonstrates that the microbes’ taxonomic composition was most influenced by benthic macroorganisms such as corals and algae, whereas their metabolic specialization varied with local oceanographic conditions. Microbial communities influence the health of associated coral reefs, but the mechanisms that govern microbial community structure and gene flow are largely unknown.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Morphological evidence of Triceratops evolution

Triceratops skulls from Montana offer a glimpse of the morphological and evolutionary processes at work in late Cretaceous dinosaur species, according to a study. Researchers have debated whether morphological distinctions between Triceratops horridus and Triceratops prorsus specimens represented intra-species variation, sexual dimorphism, or characteristics of two separate species.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Abundance and distribution of ocean plastic debris

Plastic pollution extends over the entire surface of the global ocean but at concentrations less than predicted, suggesting an unknown sink for small plastic particles, according to a study. Mass production technologies for plastics emerged in the mid-1900s, followed by plastic waste accumulations in the world’s oceans.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mass spectrometry may help guide brain tumor surgery

Using a mass spectrometry-based technique to detect a tumor metabolite, researchers report that real-time diagnosis might help surgeons trace the margins of human brain tumors in the operating room. Surgical resection of tumors often requires diagnostic information, currently obtained through pathologists’ painstaking and time-consuming microscopic examination of biopsies.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Motivation and success

Having external, instrumental motives to succeed in addition to internal motives harms rather than helps persistence and performance, a study finds. Researchers have long distinguished between internal motivation—driven by internal passions to perform—and instrumental motivation—driven by external goals such as grades or promotions.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hundreds of species likely obscured by lichen’s name

The lichen-forming fungus Dictyonema glabratum, an ecologically important denizen of tropical mountainous and southern temperate scrublands and forests, might represent hundreds of undiscovered species, according to a study. The fungus D. glabratum, which thrives abundantly as a lichen in symbiosis with photosynthetic partners in the endangered paramos ecosystems of South America, for example, was long considered a single taxonomic unit.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Old World monkeys in Arabia

A fossil discovery suggests that a group of Old World monkeys known as guenons appeared as many as 3.5 million years earlier than previously believed, according to a study. Also called cheek pouch monkeys, Cercopithecinae, the primate subfamily that includes guenons, represents the most diverse and successful of Old World monkeys.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gender bias and life sciences faculties

Elite male faculty members in the life sciences train significantly fewer female graduate students and postdoctoral researchers than other faculty members, a study reports. Despite receiving more than half of all biology-related PhDs, women are vastly under-represented at the faculty level in the life sciences.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Invasion of cane toads from South America to Australia

The cane toad’s invasion of Australia may shed light on a longstanding ecological theory, a study suggests. Niche theory, proposed around 50 years ago, states that the place where a species lives is dictated by its physiology, which defines its “fundamental niche,” as well as dispersal barriers and interactions with other species that constrain the fundamental niche to the “realized niche.”

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Well integrity and methane leakage

Unconventional oil and gas wells, such as hydrofractured wells, may pose a higher risk of methane leakage than conventional wells, according to a study. Elevated levels of methane in Pennsylvania aquifers near unconventional wells have prompted an assessment of whether methane may be leaking from unconventional wells.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Malaria infection may enhance host attractiveness to mosquitoes

Mice infected with malaria release a different odor profile from that of uninfected individuals, making infected mice more attractive to mosquitoes, according to a study. Mosquitoes serve as vectors of malaria infection, acquiring malaria parasites during blood feeding on infected individuals and eventually transmitting the parasites to other individuals.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Strains of amyloid beta and patterns of AD pathogenesis

In a pair of studies, researchers report that natural and synthetic strains of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides trigger distinct patterns of brain amyloid plaques in mice and that distinct strains of brain Aβ might contribute to the observed clinical heterogeneity among patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study finds that rubbing two solids against each other in the presence of a liquid creates microscopic bubbles as the surfaces experience microscale fractures, and that small bubbles coalesce into a trail of bubbles in a process called tribonucleation.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Pediatrics
Videoconferencing with family and friends lowers stress for pediatric patients

To ease isolation during extended hospitalizations, UC Davis Children’s Hospital offers secure videoconferencing for patients and families. While anecdotal accounts have suggested the “Family-Link” program enhances quality of life during long hospital stays, clinicians wondered if the technology also offered clinical benefits.

William Randolph Hearst Foundation, Golden Bear Chapter of the California AT&T Pioneers

Contact: Tricia Tomiyoshi
tricia.tomiyoshi-marsom@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9706
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Are conservatives more obedient and agreeable than their liberal counterparts?

Over the last few years, we've seen increasing dissent among liberals and conservatives on important issues such as gun control, health care and same-sex marriage. Both sides often have a difficult time reconciling their own views with their opposition, and many times it appears that liberals are unable to band together under a unifying platform.

National Science Foundation, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Contact: Jennifer Santisi
press@spsp.org
202-524-6543
Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Science
Disrupting ocean circulation extended Earth’s glacial cycles

A new study suggests that a major disruption of the thermohaline circulation (THC) -- a particular feature of the oceans’ large-scale circulation pattern -- initiated a change during the mid-Pleistocene transition that increased Earth’s glacial-interglacial cycles from about 41,000-year cycles to 100,000-year cycles.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Science
Finding flowers gets harder amid competing smells

Insects follow the odors of flowers to find their next nectar nibble, but a new study reports that competing odors, including manmade odors, make this task harder by altering odor perception of the target odor in the insects’ brains. Until now, scientists haven’t known much about how insects discriminate the odors of certain flowers amid the variety of natural and manmade odors in the air.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Science
Why the same electric organs showed up in unrelated fish

The electric organs fish use to navigate and communicate -- mystifying to scientists in that have they shown up repeatedly in unrelated fish species -- evolved in their hosts because certain developmental pathways were modified in each one, a new study reports.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Science
A more ancient origin of animal-built reefs

The discovery of an approximately 548 million-year-old reef in Namibia, made of the world’s earliest known skeletal animals, suggests that these aquatic organisms had been building reefs before the Cambrian explosion.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 351-375 out of 739 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ]