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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 534 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Science
Greenland ice sheet is being shaped by its past

A stiff upper layer of ice that formed atop of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the Holocene era may be causing the deceleration of ice flow within, a new study suggests. A better understanding of the inner nature of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is critical for estimating its mass loss in the future, and thus sea level rise.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Science
Mites drive deformed wing virus in honeybees

A new analysis of one of the most widespread honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus, or DWV, shows that the virus has gone from an endemic to a global epidemic because of greater movement of a major vector, the Varroa mite.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Science
Europe’s managed forests are contributing to warming; worldwide deforestation is increasing surface temperatures

Two new studies reveal how altering tree coverage is influencing not only the carbon cycle, but air surface temperatures to a significant degree as well. The results highlight how human-made changes to forests hold more severe consequences than previously believed.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Model helps decide drug dose for clinical testing

A mathematical model may offer a valuable tool for selecting the proper dose of antiviral drugs for further testing in clinical trials. Researchers showed that the model can accurately predict the results of a clinical study of a herpes drug and pinpoint the most effective dose for treatment.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Science Bulletin
Smartphones for Sensing

Simple, portable analytical devices are permeating into different aspects of our daily lives. Smartphones, as the most popular state-of-art mobile device, have demonstrated remarkable potential for sensing. In a review published in 2016(3) issue of Science Bulletin, recent researches focusing on smartphone sensing including representative electromagnetic, optical and electrochemical sensors have been summarized. The development of these capabilities will lead to more compact, lightweight, cost-effective and durable devices in terms of their performances in the future.

National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Niu Li
lniu@ciac.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
JAMA
Medication shows effectiveness in treating nasal polyps for patients with Chronis sinusitis

Use of the medication dupilumab resulted in improvement of nasal polyps in patients with chronic sinusitis and nasal polyposis not responsive to intranasal corticosteroids alone, according to a study in the Feb. 2, 2106 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Claus Bachert
Claus.Bachert@UGent.be
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
JAMA
Higher levels of mercury in brain not linked with increased risk of Alzheimer disease

In a study of deceased individuals, moderate seafood consumption was correlated with lesser Alzheimer disease neuropathology, and although seafood consumption was associated with higher brain levels of mercury, the higher mercury levels were not correlated with more Alzheimer disease neuropathology, according to a study in the Feb. 2, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Nancy Di Fiore
Nancy_Difiore@rush.edu
312-942-5159
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers calculated the fraction of papers with international co-authorships in a dataset from the United States National Science Foundation's 2014 Science and Engineering Indicators for seven different scientific fields over the period 1997-2012, and compared the results with earlier studies from the 1970s and early 1990s, finding that the difference in collaboration patterns between basic and applied fields has decreased since 1973 and suggesting a convergence between basic and applied sciences.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Microplastics and Pacific oyster reproductive cycle

Pollutants known as microplastics may endanger the Pacific oyster and other marine bivalves, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Competition and extinction of Neanderthals

A study suggests how Neanderthals could have been driven to extinction by competition with modern humans. Archaeologists have hypothesized that competition between Neanderthals and modern humans led to the former's extinction because modern humans had a more advanced culture than Neanderthals, giving modern humans a competitive edge.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Human languages may share common semantic structure

Human languages possess a common structure underlying word meaning that is independent of culture and geography, a study suggests. Researchers have attempted to determine whether there are universal properties of human cognition that underlie the structure of human languages or whether language is instead a reflection of culture or environment.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Feb-2016
Science China:Life Sciences
A reciprocating motion-driven rotation mechanism for the ATP synthase

The ATP synthase employs an intriguing rotary mechanism for the generation of ATP from ADP and Pi, using energy stored in a transmembrane proton gradient. The conventional rotary model, although being generally accepted, remains difficult to explain certain experimental observations. Researchers from Peking University propose an alternative rotary model for the ATP synthase such that what rotates is the catalytic a3b3 cylinder rather than the central stalk and the membrane-embedded c-ring.

the National Basic Research Program of China (2012CB917300 to Zengyi Chang and Xinmiao Fu), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31470766 and 31170738 to ZYC, 31270804 and 31570778 to Xinmiao Fu).

Contact: Zengyi Chang
changzy@pku.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 1-Feb-2016
PolyU develops fluorescent probes for rapid detection of formaldehyde in food

The Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology (ABCT) of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed fluorescent probes for rapid detection of formaldehyde in food.

Guangzhou Science and Technology Fund

Contact: Janice Chan
janice.hw.chan@polyu.edu.hk
852-276-65104
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Public Release: 29-Jan-2016
Science
Keeping immune cells quiet on a diet?

A population of suppressive T cells in the small intestines of mice prevents immune responses to solid foods, a new study finds.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Jan-2016
Science
Inhibiting certain immune signals halts development of autism in mice

A new study has identified a subset of immune signaling proteins that are associated with the development of autism.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Jan-2016
Science
Replacement of the Y chromosome in male mice

Researchers have successfully replaced the Y chromosome in mice, while preserving the male’s ability to produce offspring, by increasing expression of just two genes -.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Jan-2016
Science
Ancient Babylonians used advanced geometry to track Jupiter

Analysis of ancient Babylonian tablets reveal that its makers used geometry techniques to calculate the position of Jupiter, a technique that was previously believed to have been developed at least 1,400 years later in 14th century Europe.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Discovery of a new drug target could lead to novel treatment for severe autism

Penn State University scientists have discovered a novel drug target and have rescued functional deficits in human nerve cells derived from patients with Rett Syndrome, a severe form of autism-spectrum disorder. The research, led by Gong Chen, professor of biology and the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences at Penn State, could lead to a new treatment for Rett Syndrome and other forms of autism-spectrum disorders.

Contact: Barbara Kennedy or Gong Chen
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 28-Jan-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Less fat in the blood when this gene’s knocked out

(This study is part of the Obesity special issue.) Disabling a protein called USF1 may open new therapeutic avenues for cardiometabolic diseases, ranging from obesity and diabetes to atherosclerosis and fatty liver disease, researchers say.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
Science Bulletin
Scientists provide new guideline for synthesis of fullerene electron acceptors

Fullerene derivatives are most widely used as irreplaceable electron acceptors in organic/polymer solar cells so far. A recent study supplements a stereomer-dependent guideline for designing fullerene electron acceptors (cover articles in Science Bulletin, 2016 No.2 issue).

National Basic Research 973 Program of China (2014CB845601), National Nature Science Foundation of China (U1205111, 21390390, 51572231, and 51502252)

Contact: XIE Su-Yuan
syxie@xmu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
JAMA
Findings suggest vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy may not reduce risk of asthma, wheezing in offspring

Two randomized trials in the Jan. 26, 2016 issue of JAMA examine if vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy would reduce the risk of asthma or persistent wheezing in offspring.

Contact: Johanna Younghans
Jyounghans@partners.org
617-525-6373
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
JAMA
Comparison of smoking cessation therapies finds similar quit rates

Among adults motivated to quit smoking, 12 weeks of treatment with a nicotine patch, the drug varenicline, or combination nicotine replacement therapy produced no significant differences in confirmed rates of smoking abstinence at 26 or 52 weeks, raising questions about the current relative effectiveness of intense smoking cessation pharmacotherapies, according to a study in the Jan. 26, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Christopher Hollenback
ch3@ctri.wisc.edu
608-262-3902
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 26-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report widespread hunting-associated declines and local extinctions in large fruit-eating mammal populations, which provide the dominant mode of seed dispersal for many high-biomass heavy-wooded tree species, and simulations of tree turnover rates predict a consequent shift in tree species composition in many otherwise undisturbed Amazonian forest sites, resulting in a loss of forest biomass and carbon stocks across most of the Amazon region.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Revisiting sea level rise budgets

A study assesses the contributors to global and regional sea level rise. Projecting the rates and consequences of future sea level rise requires an understanding of the relative contributors to current sea level rise.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain size and problem solving among carnivores

A study suggests that carnivorous mammals with larger brain sizes relative to body mass than others might have better problem-solving skills.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 351-375 out of 534 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]