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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 572 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Science Bulletin
Biodegradable and broad-spectrum nanoparticles as potent antibacterial agents

In order to develop a novel antibacterial materials to reduce the growingly bacterial resistance, in a paper appearing recently in Science Bulletin (2015, 60(2):216-226), a team of scientists at the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, China, led by Guangjun Nie and Yuliang Zhao, has designed and synthesized biocompatible and biodegradable ε-poly-L-lysine (EPL)/poly (-caprolactone) (PCL) nanoparticles (NPs), which have effective antibacterial activity and no significant cytotoxicity to mammalian cells.

National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2012CB934000, 2011CB933400);National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31325010, 21277037)

Contact: NIE Guangjun
niegj@nanoctr.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Science Bulletin
Fe3C-functionalized 3D N-doped carbon structures for electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide

Fe3C-functionalized 3D graphite carbon nanocomposite (Fe3C/NG) was prepared by one-pot pyrolysis of FeCl3 impregnated melamine foam. Because of the synergic effect between the two types of active sites from the iron carbide species and the N-doped graphite carbon, the superior electrochemical activity of the advanced Fe3C/NG for hydrogen peroxide detection, as low as 0.035mmol/L of hydrogen peroxide can be detected. The novel and low-cost Fe3C/NG may be a promising alternative in fabricating hydrogen peroxide sensors.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (21275136) and the National Natural Science Foundation of Jilin Province (201215090)

Contact: Wei Chen
weichen@ciac.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Science
Rare, isolated galaxies might be runaways, study suggests

Just because some compact elliptical galaxies are alone without massive galactic neighbors to strip their stars away doesn’t mean that they weren’t already stripped by a larger galaxy earlier, researchers say. This study by Igor Chillingarian and colleagues suggests that tidal such stripping remains a viable origin for isolated compact elliptical galaxies, the appearance of which had recently confounded astronomers.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Science
Ancient teeth inform humans’ arrival in Europe

Dental remains from two different sites in Italy suggest that modern humans were responsible for the Protoaurignacian culture, artifacts of which are associated with the arrival of Homo sapiens in Western Europe. This finding helps to settle a long-standing debate about the group responsible for this culture, which appeared in Southwest and Southcentral Europe about 42,000 years ago, and coincided with the demise of Neandertals in the region.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Science
Under the hood of Yellowstone’s supervolcano

Geologists now have a complete picture of the active volcanic system underlying Yellowstone National Park in the United States, thanks to this study by Hsin-Hua Huang and colleagues. The researchers identified a large pool of magma in the Earth’s lower crust and suggest that it represents the last piece of a puzzle related to the park’s volcanic plumbing.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Apr-2015
Science
Peer review critical to identifying most promising research

Peer review helps distinguish research applications with the highest potential impact, according to a new study. This is because peer review generates new insights about grant application quality that could not have been predicted using measures like an applicant's past accomplishments alone.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
New research points to elderly as growing contributor to tuberculosis in China

A major contributor to the number of tuberculosis infections and cases in China will likely be the elderly over the next few decades, requiring a refocus in efforts to control a disease affecting millions of people in the country, according to preliminary new research presented today at the Fourth Global Forum on TB Vaccines in Shanghai.

Contact: Ellen Wilcox
ewilcox@aeras.org
240-422-2145
Burness Communications

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Devices in living tumor better predict cancer drug response

Two devices that test multiple cancer drugs directly in the body, in living tumor tissue, are paving a path to personalized treatment. By bringing the lab to the patient, the devices, which were developed by two separate groups, can potentially guide selection of the most effective treatment for an individual, before initiating systemic cancer therapy.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

In a study involving 152 individuals divided into 10-person groups in which a message about the risks of using an antibacterial agent were communicated from one person to the next, the message content became increasingly inaccurate as it was passed down the chain, and the degree of risk became amplified, suggesting that the public's risk perception of hazardous events may be shaped by social networks.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Future of the fossil record

A collection of papers in the Future of the Fossil Record Special Feature highlights the role of paleontology in exploring the evolution of biological form and the dynamics of species and major lineages in space and time.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How some fishes offset cost of generating body heat

Boosts in cruising speed and an expanded annual migration range might help some fish species offset the high cost of maintaining elevated body temperatures, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Early crop adoption on the Tibetan Plateau

The climatic requirements of wheat and barley may have enhanced, rather than delayed, their adoption as agricultural staples on the Tibetan Plateau, according to a study. Researchers previously suggested that the long growing seasons of wheat and barley crops delayed their adoption by famers on the Tibetan Plateau.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Champagne trove reveals clues to 19th-century winemaking

Chemical and sensory analysis of 170-year-old champagnes previously recovered from the Baltic Sea reveals hints of 19th-century winemaking practices, according to a study. Strewn amid the wreckage of a schooner 50 m below the surface of the Baltic Sea off the coast of Finland, 168 bottles of champagne were dredged up in 2010 by divers who spotted them in the shipwreck.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Naturally transgenic sweet potato

Genes from naturally occurring bacteria are found in cultivated sweet potatoes around the world, according to a study. Agrobacterium bacteria are common plant pathogens that display the ability to transfer segments of their DNA to plants, a property also used by plant scientists to produce transgenic or genetically modified crops.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Spatial variability of airborne microorganisms

Variability in airborne microorganisms associated with dust suggests that geographic location, climate, and soil conditions can affect airborne microbe community composition, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Disruptions in public transit systems

Modeling of passenger behavior in public transportation systems can identify the stations vulnerable to service disruptions, according to a study. An accurate understanding of traffic patterns in public transportation systems is crucial to mitigating the effects of both planned and unplanned transportation disturbances.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Pressure dynamics in carbon sequestration aquifers

Changing pressure dynamics during geologic CO2 injection for the typical range of values of properties of the storage aquifer and overlying caprock may make earthquakes an unlikely consequence of CO2 sequestration, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Drought and Maya societal disruption

The ancient Maya civilization may have adapted but eventually succumbed to centuries of widespread and intense drought, a study suggests. Paleoclimate indicators, primarily from the northern Maya Lowlands, show that periods of major drought preceded the societal collapse of the Maya between 800 and 950 CE.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Phytoplankton and Arctic warming

Future climate warming plus losses in Arctic sea ice could spur the growth of phytoplankton that could in turn raise Arctic sea surface temperatures even further, a study finds. Aquatic photosynthetic microalgae, or phytoplankton, constitute the foundation of the marine food chain. Previous studies have demonstrated that these tiny organisms may also factor critically in future global climate change by virtue of their ability to consume atmospheric CO2.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Early adversity and development of stress responses

Children raised in institutional settings display altered stress responses, compared with children raised by foster families, according to a study. Studies in mice indicate that early exposure to adverse conditions can alter how the sympathetic nervous system responds to stress. To examine the effects of adversity on the human nervous system, Katie McLaughlin and colleagues studied the development of abandoned children in Romania.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
JAMA
High-dose oral insulin shows potential for preventing type 1 diabetes in high-risk children

In a pilot study that included children at high risk for type 1 diabetes, daily high-dose oral insulin, compared with placebo, resulted in an immune response to insulin without hypoglycemia, findings that support the need for a phase 3 trial to determine whether oral insulin can prevent islet autoimmunity and diabetes in high-risk children, according to a study in the April 21 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health.

Contact: Ezio Bonifacio, Ph.D.
ezio.bonifacio@crt-dresden.de
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
JAMA
No association found between MMR vaccine and autism, even among children at higher risk

In a study that included approximately 95,000 children with older siblings, receipt of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine was not associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), regardless of whether older siblings had ASD, findings that indicate no harmful association between receipt of MMR vaccine and ASD even among children already at higher risk for ASD, according to a study in the April 21 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health.

Contact: Anjali Jain,M.D.
christine.farazi@optum.com
952-500-0592
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Developing a robotic therapist for children

In collaboration with other national institutions, researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) are designing a new therapeutic tool for motor rehabilitation for children. In this project, an interactive social therapist robot, which is totally autonomous, is able to perceive patients’ reactions and determine if they are doing their exercises correctly.

Contact: fjalonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 18-Apr-2015
Conservation Letters
Expanding rubber plantations ‘catastrophic’ for endangered species in Southeast Asia

Demand for natural rubber fuelled by the tyre industry is threatening protected parts of Southeast Asia - according to research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
Science
No magnetic field for comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Rosetta reports

Based on magnetic field measurements from an instrument onboard the Rosetta spacecraft’s lander module, which touched down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko last November in the first-ever comet soft landing, this comet does not have a global magnetic field.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 351-375 out of 572 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]