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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 720 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic evidence for Neolithic routes into Europe

DNA analysis of southern Europeans suggests that Neolithic people may have migrated into Europe along a series of Mediterranean islands, according to a study. European genomes show evidence of mixture between Paleolithic people, who colonized Europe before 35,000 BCE, and Neolithic people, who arrived in Europe around 9,000 BCE. Archaeologists have suggested a maritime colonization route as a possible pathway, albeit with little supporting physical evidence.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Perceptions of race may change during economic scarcity

Conditions of economic scarcity may alter an individual’s visual perception of race, potentially resulting in racial discrimination in resource allocation, according to a study. Socioeconomic disparities between whites and racial minorities in the United States are exacerbated during periods of economic decline.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Roadside salt runoff and butterfly development

A study links salt runoff from roadside applications to altered development of the brain and flight muscles of butterflies. Anthropogenic changes to environmental levels of macronutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus can influence animal traits, but the effects of similar changes to micronutrients are unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry
Aptamer-based Au-nanochannels membrane for separation of β-estradiol and estrone

A new method for separation of β-estradiol and estrone by the modified gold nanochannels membrane was described. The gold nanochannels were prepared by chemical deposition of gold on polycarbonate templates membrane.

NSFC(No.21275100)

Contact: Shansheng Huang
sshuang@shnu.edu.cn
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Science
How sleep strengthens synapses and benefits memory

Sleep solidifies memories, a study in mice reports, and it does so by encouraging the growth of new synapses in the brain. Scientists have long known that sleep helps boost learning and memory, though how this process works has been murky, especially as sleep has been shown to decrease the number of brain synapses, or nerve connections.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Science
Getting under its wool and into its genes -- the sheep genome

Researchers have sequenced the sheep genome, concluding the collection of reference genome sequences for major livestock species. By comparing its genetic underpinnings to those of other mammals, they pinpointed genes that may explain the sheep’s specialized digestive system and the sheep’s unique fat metabolism process, which helps maintain its thick, woolly coat.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Science
Sensors help catfish 'see' in the dark

Finding food in the dark can be tricky. That may be why the Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicas, comes equipped with sensors that can detect slight changes in the water’s pH level, researchers say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Science
Support for the giant impact hypothesis of Moon formation

For decades, the origins of the Moon have been as murky as a black hole’s interior, but now a new study shines light on the Moon’s making. Scientists aren’t completely sure how the Moon formed but they have a prevailing theory, the Giant Impact Hypothesis, which suggests that the Moon was formed by a collision between a proto-Earth and a solid object of mysterious composition called Theia.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Pushing heart disease treatment forward - Special Issue

For this special issue, the editors of Science Translational Medicine have invited experts to weigh in on one of the leading killers in the United States, heart disease, a condition on the rise in the developing world, too.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
PLoS ONE
You catch (and kill) more flies with this sweetener

In a study that began as a sixth-grade science fair project, researchers at Drexel University have found that a popular non-nutritive sweetener, erythritol, may be an effective and human-safe insecticide.

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
JAMA
For older adults with pneumonia, treatment including azithromycin associated with lower risk of death, small increased risk of heart attack

In a study that included nearly 65,000 older patients hospitalized with pneumonia, treatment that included azithromycin compared with other antibiotics was associated with a significantly lower risk of death and a slightly increased risk of heart attack, according to a study in the June 4 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Eric M. Mortensen, M.D., M.Sc.
lisa.warshaw@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-9349
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
JAMA
Preventive placement of ICDs in patients with less severe heart failure associated with improved survival

An examination of the benefit of preventive placement of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in patients with a less severe level of heart failure, a group not well represented in clinical trials, finds significantly better survival at three years than that of similar patients with no ICD, according to a study in the June 4 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Sana M. Al-Khatib, M.D., M.H.S.
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
China Science Bulletin
Has solar activity influence on the Earth’s global warming?

Natural force can lead to the climate change of the Earth. A recent study demonstrates the existence of significant resonance cycles and high correlations between solar activity and the Earth’s averaged surface temperature during centuries. The former has non-ignorable effects on the latter. This study has been published on CHINESE SCIENCE BULLETIN (In Chinese), 2014, No.14.

Supported by the National Basic Research Program (973 program) under grant 2012CB825601, the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KZZD-EW-01-4), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41031066, 41231068, 41274179, 41

Contact: ZHAO Xinhua
xhzhao@spaceweather.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
Modeling and simulation in the big data era

A paper introduces the main viewpoints and achievements of the 81st new ideas and new theories academic salon of China Association for Science and Technology was published in 2014(5)issue of SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences. The theme of salon is “challenges and thinking of modeling and simulation in the era of big data”.

China Association for Science and Technology, Chinese Association for System Simulation

Contact: Hu XiaoFeng
xfhu@vip.sina.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study finds that the anti-glycemic drug metformin can extend lifespan in the roundworm C. elegans through the process of mitohormesis, in which production of reactive oxygen species activates the antioxidant peroxiredoxin, implicated in lifespan.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
BioScience
Rolling old river is indeed changing

A team of ecologists has documented and summarized far-reaching changes in the Hudson River since 1987, most as a result of human activity. Invasive species, pollution reductions, increased flow, and higher temperatures are among the most pronounced causes, but other changes are mysterious. Rivers must be understood over a decadal timescale, the researchers argue.

This work was supported by grants from the Hudson River Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, New York Sea Grant, and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Contact: Jennifer Williams
jwilliams@aibs.org
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gendered hurricane names and death toll

Hurricanes with female names have extracted a higher death toll on United States populations than hurricanes with male names, according to a study. Meteorologists have endorsed the practice of naming hurricanes as a means to enhance the public’s ability to recall important safety-related information.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Emotions may be contagious in a social network

Viewing positive Facebook posts may increase positive emotions; likewise, negative posts may engender negative emotions, according to a study. Adam D. I. Kramer and colleagues explored how changes to positive and negative content appearing in the “News Feed” feature of 689,003 people who use Facebook influenced the type of content the people created.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Origin of potato blight pathogen

A genetic analysis of potato late blight pathogen populations from around the world reveals that the pathogen likely originated in Mexico, not in the South American Andes as previous analyses had suggested. Potato late blight is caused by Phytophthora infestans, a fungus-like oomycete that was largely responsible for the European potato famines of the 1840s.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Direct conversion of switchgrass to ethanol by an engineered bacterium

According to a study, a genetically engineered strain of a lignocellulose-degrading bacterium can convert not only biomass cellulose to sugars, but also the sugars to ethanol for fuel. A primary obstacle to the cost-effectiveness of biofuel production from plant biomass is the cost of chemically and enzymatically pretreating biomass before fermentation to ethanol by microbes.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bee navigation and cognitive maps

Bees navigate by building mental maps of familiar terrain rather than by using only the sun’s position, according to a study. Mammals navigate by means of cognitive maps, continuous mental maps of familiar terrain built through experience and continually referenced and updated, but it is unclear whether insects navigate in a similar way.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Mapping the spider genome

For the first time ever, a group of Danish and Chinese researchers has sequenced the genome of the spider. This knowledge provides a much more qualified basis for studying features of the spider. It also shows that humans share certain genomic similarities with spiders.

Contact: Xiaodong Fang
fangxiaodong@gmail.com
Aarhus University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
China Science Bulletin
Miniature digital zenith telescope for astronomy and geoscience

Utilizing CCD camera, high-precision tiltmeter and other new technologies and devices, Chinese researchers have successfully developed a new type of Digital Zenith Telescope prototype (DZT), which will play a significant role in the interdisciplinary researches between astronomy and geoscience. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin, 2014, Vol.59 (17).

Contact: TIAN Lili
tianll@bao.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Psychological Science
Heavily decorated classrooms disrupt attention and learning in young children

Maps, number lines, shapes, artwork and other materials tend to cover elementary classroom walls. However, new research from Carnegie Mellon University shows that too much of a good thing may end up disrupting attention and learning in young children.

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-260-0675
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
New launchers for analyzing resistance to impacts and improving armor plating

New pneumatic launchers at the Impact on Aeronautical Structures Laboratory, located at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) Science Park, make it possible to carry out a wide range of studies on problems of impact that arise in the aeronautics industry and on optimum armor plating in other sectors.

Contact: javier alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Showing releases 351-375 out of 720 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]