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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 560 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature
Population benefits of sexual selection explain the existence of males

New research from the University of East Anglia shows that an evolutionary force known as ‘sexual selection’ can explain the persistence of sex as a dominant mechanism for reproducing offspring.

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 17-May-2015
ATS 2015 International Conference
Many children with asthma have reaction to peanuts, but do not know it

In recent years and months, peanut allergies in children have been in the news frequently, as scientists reveal new insights into why more and more children are developing them and what can be done to avoid them. However, until now, few have studied the connection between peanut allergy and childhood asthma.

Contact: Nathaniel Dunford
ndunford@thoracic.org
American Thoracic Society

Public Release: 16-May-2015
Biomicrofluidics
New IVF device may improve fertility treatment

To make IVF more efficient, a team of researchers from National Tsing Hua University and the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan has developed a technique to more effectively grow and screen embryos prior to implantation. Their results, published in the journal Biomicrofluidics, from AIP Publishing, could facilitate more targeted selection of embryos to implant, lead to higher IVF success rates, and ultimately and lower its cost.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-May-2015
AIP Advances
Floats like a mosquito, stings like a...mosquito

By examining the forces that the segments of mosquito legs generate against a water surface, researchers at the China University of Petroleum (Huadong) and Liaoning University of Technology have unraveled the mechanical logic that allows the mosquitoes to walk on water, which may help in the design of biomimetic structures, such as aquatic robots and small boats.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-May-2015
Review of Scientific Instruments
The future of holographic video

Using surface acoustic waves to control light's angle and color composition, BYU and MIT researchers open door to inexpensive holographic video displays.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Acoustic levitation made simple

A team of researchers at the University of São Paulo in Brazil has developed a new levitation device that can hover a tiny object with more control than any instrument that has come before.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Science
Bees follow separate but similar paths in social evolution

There’s more than one way to evolve the unique social structure that characterizes colony-living animals like bees, according to a detailed genome analysis conducted by Karen Kapheim and colleagues. Bees are eusocial, meaning that some of their workers forego reproduction to care for their siblings.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Science
Why modern hunter-gatherers live with so few kin

Allowing both males and females in hunter-gatherer groups to choose their living companions reduces the number of family members in individual hunter-gatherer camps, a new study shows. The results answer a longstanding mystery about why hunter-gatherer populations have evolved to comprise large numbers of unrelated individuals, especially since hunter-gatherers have shown a strong preference to live with kin.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Science
Deep-water fish has a warm heart

One thing that sets mammals and birds apart from animals like fish is the ability to internally warm their whole bodies above the outside temperature. Though some large predatory fish, like tuna, have been shown to temporarily warm muscles or organs during pursuit, according to a new report by Nicholas Wegner and colleagues, at least one fish may have done that one better by being able to internally generate heat that warms both its heart and brain.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Science
Program brings lasting progress for world’s poorest

A program that combines direct aid and training can help the world’s poorest households “graduate” from extreme poverty into sustainable standards of living, a new analysis shows. The program was tested in 11,000 households in Ethiopia, Ghana, Honduras, India, Pakistan, and Peru.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-May-2015
PolyU develops novel computer intelligence system for acute stroke detection

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. The detection accuracy is 90%, which is as high as that conducted by specialists, but at a much reduced time from 10-15 minutes to 3 minutes. The new system serves as a second opinion for frontline medical doctors, enabling timely and appropriate treatment for stroke patients.

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Contact: Margaret Ho
margaret.fc.ho@polyu.edu.hk
852-276-66374
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Small RNAs quickly predict injury from radiation

Analyzing distinct molecular patterns in the blood can predict long-term injury from radiation within 24 hours of exposure, much faster than existing methods for estimating doses of absorbed radiation, a new study shows in mice.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of stable isotopes and trace elements within a stalagmite from the southern Pyrenees finds that Greenland Stadial 1, a cool period that began around 12,800 years ago, was likely characterized by an initial dry period in Southern Europe, followed by a humid period beginning around 12,500 years ago that may have been triggered by resumption of previously interrupted Atlantic overturning circulation, a finding that challenges previous models of dry and cold stadial periods.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ocean acidification and plankton mass extinctions

Ocean acidification likely did not cause the great extinctions of marine calcifying plankton at the end of the Cretaceous Period, a study suggests. The mass extinctions following the Chicxulub asteroid impact around 66 million years ago included ammonites, a mollusk that inhabited Earth’s ancient oceans, and 90% of plankton species with calcium carbonate shells.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wheat yield and global warming

Wheat varieties may decrease yield to compensate for a warming climate, according to a study. Climate change is projected to decrease crop yields in many regions. To model the effect of rising global temperatures on United States wheat yields, Jesse Tack and colleagues combined results from field trials of wheat varieties in Kansas between 1985 and 2013 with weather data from the site of each field trial.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Atmospheric record in Antarctic blue ice

Air bubbles, trapped in some of the oldest known ice on Earth, suggest that Antarctic temperatures 1 million years ago were linked to greenhouse gas concentrations, according to a study. Decades ago, researchers extracted samples of past atmospheres from ice cores and found that greenhouse gas concentrations track a 100,000-year glacial cycle dating back 800,000 years.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate and bird migration

Large-scale and irregular movements, or irruptions, of boreal seed-eating birds across North America may be driven by antecedent climate conditions and may be predictable, according to a study. Irruptions can entail both unfavorable conditions that push birds out of their breeding habitat and favorable conditions that attract them elsewhere.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Artificial light exposure and obesity

A study in mice suggests that brown adipose tissue may mediate the link between environmental light pollution and a number of obesity-related illnesses, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies suggest constant light exposure disrupts the sleep-wake cycle, thereby decreasing energy expenditure and promoting weight gain.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rotating harvest in a sea cucumber fishery

A study finds that a spatially rotating harvest strategy may improve the biological and economic health of fisheries. Rotation of crop harvests has long been successfully applied to agriculture, and may confer similar benefits on marine species with low mobility, such as sea cucumbers, scallops, and abalone. Éva E. Plagányi and colleagues modeled the species dynamics of the sea cucumber fishery in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Potassium channels and binge drinking

Researchers report a link between potassium channels in the brain and the tendency for binge drinking in mice. Ion channels called G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels regulate neuronal excitability. Such channels can be activated by ethanol, but the role of the activation in the behavioral effects of ethanol consumption is unclear.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Linking microbiome samples to human sources

Researchers report unique and stable metagenomic codes for the identification of human microbiome samples. Blood types and genomic variation have long been used to single out individuals in forensics, genealogy, and disaster response, but the microbiome, the complement of microbes found in each person, has so far failed to yield fingerprints, partly due to the lack of robust, stable, and specific codes for individual microbiomes in populations.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
JAMA
Public health advisories associated with reductions in dispensing of codeine to postpartum women

Public health advisories from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Health Canada were associated with significant reductions in the rate of dispensing of codeine to postpartum women, according to a study in the May 12 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Kate Smolina, Ph.D.
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 11-May-2015
JAMA Internal Medicine
Mediterranean diet supplemented with olive oil or nuts associated with improved cognitive function

Supplementing the plant-based Mediterranean diet with antioxidant-rich extra virgin olive oil or mixed nuts was associated with improved cognitive function in a study of older adults in Spain but the authors warn more investigation is needed, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Contact: Emilio Ros,M.D.,Ph.D.
eros@clini.ub.es
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Science
GTEx -- How our fenetic code regulates gene expression

A new study presents the first analysis of the pilot dataset from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, which investigates how our underlying DNA regulates gene expression. All the cells in a person's body have the same genes.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Science
Mercury’s core dynamo present early in planet’s history

The Messenger spacecraft, which crash-landed into Mercury just a few days ago, found traces of magnetization in Mercury’s crust, a new study reports. The presence of residual magnetization provides insights into the planet’s evolution.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 276-300 out of 560 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]