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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 711 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Science
The coffee genome -- a perfect blend of caffeine, aroma and flavor

Researchers have sequenced the genome of coffee, shedding light on the evolution of caffeine in plants and providing insights into this popular beverage’s sought-after flavor and aroma.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Infant diet has lasting effects on immune system

The effects of breast milk on the infant immune system may persist after breastfeeding has stopped, new research in monkeys suggests. Understanding the effects of early diet on immunity may help researchers explain why some people respond differently to vaccines or are more vulnerable to infection or autoimmune disease.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
BioScience
Pesticide risk assessments seen as biased

The Environmental Protection Agency’s pesticide toxicity assessments often rely heavily on industry-funded studies and may omit research that could lead to different findings. The assessment process should be reformed in order to eliminate conflicts of interest and include a wider breadth of available information.

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
APOE and APOC1 are involved in cognitive impairment progression in Chinese late-onset AD

APOE and APOC1 are involved in cognitive impairment progression in Chinese late-onset AD.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Implact of dexamethasone on intelligence and hearing in preterm infants

Implact of dexamethasone on intelligence and hearing in preterm infants.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Microphysiological systems will revolutionize experimental biology and medicine

The September 2014 Annual Thematic Issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine is devoted to “The biology and medicine of microphysiological systems.” Papers by participants in the NIH Microphysiological Systems (MPS) Program describe MPS as in vitro models for bone/cartilage, brain, gastrointestinal tract, lung, liver, microvasculature, reproductive tract, skeletal muscle, and skin; the interconnection of MPS to support physiologically based pharmacokinetics and drug discovery and screening; and the microscale technologies that regulate stem cell differentiation.

Contact: John P. Wikswo
john.wikswo@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-4124
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
BioScience
Changing microbial dynamics in the wake of the Macondo blowout

Following the oil spill caused by the blowout at the Macondo wellhead in 2010, Gulf of Mexico microbial population dynamics shifted rapidly as numbers of oil degraders quickly increased. In addition, the spill provided an opportunity to study the newly described phenomenon of microbe-derived marine snow.

GOMRI’s Ecosystem Impacts of Oil and Gas Inputs to the Gulf and the Deep Sea to Coast Connectivity in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
JAMA
Study finds change in type of procedure most commonly used for bariatric surgery

In an analysis of the type of bariatric surgery procedures used in Michigan in recent years, sleeve gastrectomy (SG) surpassed Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in 2012 as the most common procedure performed for patients seeking this type of surgery, and SG became the predominant bariatric surgery procedure for patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study in the September 3 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
JAMA
Increase seen in use of double mastectomy, although procedure not associated with reducing risk of death

Among women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in California, the percentage undergoing a double mastectomy increased substantially between 1998 and 2011, although this procedure was not associated with a lower risk of death than breast-conserving surgery plus radiation, according to a study in the September 3 issue of JAMA. The authors did find that surgery for the removal of one breast was associated with a higher risk of death than the other options examined in the study.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Puerarin accelerates neural regeneration after sciatic nerve injury

Puerarin accelerates neural regeneration after sciatic nerve injury.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Chinese Science Bulletin
Are human breast milk microbiome ‘neutral’?

Human breast milk provides the best source of nutrients for infants and should have played a critical role for human evolution and civilization. It contains hundreds of bacteria forming the breast milk microbiome or microbiota; most of them are beneficial, but some opportunistic pathogens also exist in breast milk. Guan & Ma’s (2014) [Chinese Science Bulletin, No. 22] recent ecological analysis is aimed at understanding the mechanisms of bacteria diversity maintenance, species co-existences and distributions.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (No:61175071);“Top Scientists & Technologists Program of Yunnan Province”

Contact: Ma Zhanshan
samma@uidaho.edu
Science China Press

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Sensory reinnervation of muscle spindles after TN defect repaired by autologous vein graft

Sensory reinnervation of muscle spindles after TN defect repaired by autologous vein graft.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study finds that artificial selection to lengthen the fruit fly sex comb, a set of bristles used in courtship, results in a comb unable to rotate normally to a vertical position during development, suggesting that some morphologies may be developmentally disfavored.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
1st China International Conference on Positive Psychology
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Influence of taxi and car sharing on traffic and pollution

An online system that efficiently computes optimal taxi sharing strategies might cut cumulative taxi trip lengths by 40% or more while keeping passenger inconvenience to a minimum, a study finds.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Seeking water, oxygen, and chlorophyll on exoplanets

Space missions designed to detect life on exoplanets may be best served by a multi-tiered observing strategy in which telescopes are deployed to detect signatures of water, followed by selection of exoplanets likely to contain oxygen, and finally selection of the most promising exoplanets to search for chlorophyll, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A rapid, low-cost diagnostic for sickle cell disease

A blood test to diagnose sickle cell disease more rapidly and inexpensively than traditional tests has been developed, according to a study. Left untreated, sickle-shaped blood cells can impede circulation and cause a life-threatening complication known as a vasoocclusive crisis.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Strategic thinking in young children

Children demonstrate a sophisticated ability to think strategically at a young age, according to a study. Strategic interactions require individuals to reason about the behavior, mental states, and incentives of others, but the point at which children develop this ability remains unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Neanderthal rock engraving

A study of a rock engraving in Gorham’s Cave in Gibraltar finds that the cross-hatched impression was likely created by Neanderthals and represents Neanderthals’ capacity for abstract expression.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Influence of climate change on freshwater mountain runoff

Freshwater runoff from mountain ranges may be vulnerable to temperature increases that lengthen growing seasons and expand vegetative growth at high elevations, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Declining maize diversity

The diversity of maize varieties grown on farms across Mexico has declined in recent years, and this phenomenon may threaten crop yields in the face of climate change, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Researchers find Asian camel crickets now common in US homes

With their long, spiky legs and their propensity for eating anything, including each other, camel crickets are the stuff of nightmares. And now research from North Carolina State University finds that non-native camel cricket species have spread into homes across the eastern United States.

National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Applied Physics Letters
New method for non-invasive prostate cancer screening

A team of researchers led by Shaoxin Li at Guangdong Medical College in China has demonstrated the potential of a new, non-invasive method to screen for prostate cancer, a leading cause of cancer in men worldwide.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 30-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Ultrasonography evaluation of peripheral nerve injuries after an earthquake

Ultrasonography evaluation of peripheral nerve injuries after an earthquake.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science and Technology Review
Interpretation of the Ebola virus disease outbreak

On March 22, 2014, the ebola virus disease was found in Guinea, and then spread over the western African countries, such as Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. On August 8, 2014, WHO declared the ebola virus disease outbreak is one of the most serious in recent 40 years, constitute the international emergency public health events. Science and Technology Review published the feature to interpret and scientifically deal with ebola epidemics.

Contact: Tiantian
tiantian@cast.org.cn
86-010-621-85026
Science and Technology Review

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Rapamycin or FK506, which is better for SCs migration and peripheral nerve repair

Rapamycin or FK506, which is better for SCs migration and peripheral nerve repair

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Showing releases 276-300 out of 711 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]