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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 523 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]

Public Release: 17-May-2016
JAMA
Physicians, surrogate decision makers often do not agree on a patient’s likelihood of survival

Among critically ill patients, expectations about prognosis often differ between physicians and surrogate decision makers, and the causes are more complicated than the surrogate simply misunderstanding the physicians’ assessments of prognosis, according to a study appearing in the May 17 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-May-2016
JAMA
Early, high-dose administration of hormone EPO in very preterm infants does not improve neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 years

In a study appearing in the May 17 issue of JAMA, Giancarlo Natalucci, M.D., of the University of Zurich, Switzerland, and colleagues randomly assigned 448 preterm infants born between 26 weeks 0 days' and 31 weeks 6 days' gestation to receive either high-dose recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) or placebo (saline) intravenously within 3 hours, at 12 to 18 hours, and at 36 to 42 hours after birth.

Contact: Giancarlo Natalucci
giancarlo.natalucci@usz.ch
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 13-May-2016
Science
New insights into how magnetic lines around Earth reconnect

High-resolution measurements from NASA spacecraft have unraveled the mysteries of magnetic reconnection around Earth – a phenomenon whereby magnetic field lines break and reconnect, releasing energy and accelerating particles.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-May-2016
Science
Disrupted REM sleep can derail memory formation

A new study in mice provides direct causal evidence that rapid eye movement or REM sleep helps to consolidate memory in the brain.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-May-2016
Science
In Sierra Leone, short reconciliation ceremonies restore social ties

Short, low-cost interventions can help communities to recover from a civil war, a new study evaluating the efficacy of a postwar reconciliation strategy in Sierra Leone shows.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-May-2016
Science
While the Arctic warms, migrating birds pay the price in the tropics

Red knot birds are becoming smaller as temperatures warm in their Arctic breeding grounds. But the migrating birds don’t pay the price for this climate-caused shrinkage until they arrive at the more stable climate of their tropical winter homes.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-May-2016
Science China:Life Sciences
Where is the Chinese sturgeon going to migrate in the sea?

As a first-class protected animal in China, Chinese sturgeon is born in the Yangtze River while living in the sea. Recently, researchers have revealed the distributions of Chinese sturgeon in the sea, which were published in the Science China: Life Sciences(Chinese edition), 2016, issue 3.

Public Interest Scientific Research Fund of the Ministry of Water Resource,Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Hong Kong,Special Fund for Agro-Scientific Research in the Public Interest,National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: WEI Qiwei
weiqw@yfi.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 12-May-2016
Nano Research
A simple and novel method for the quantitative detection of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

In this work, we report the first application of antibody-functionalized CNT-FETs in quantitative detection of 5-hmC from mouse tissues. This technology could be developed into facile routine 5-hmC monitoring devices for clinic human disease diagnoses.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 12-May-2016
Nano Research
A novel oscillator based on heterogeneous carbon@MoS2 nanotubes

A smooth and stable oscillator with a frequency reaching 20 GHz can be obtained based on a double-walled carbon and molybdenum disulfide heteronanotube for a wide range of gap width values.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 12-May-2016
Nano Research
Superfluorinated copper sulfide nanoprobes for simultaneous 19F magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal ablation

Multifunctional Cu7S4@PSI-19F nanoprobes with ultrahigh loading of fluorous content were developed and found to be highly stable and biocompatible, with applications as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for simultaneous in vivo 19F MRI and MRI-guided photothermal ablation of tumors.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 12-May-2016
Science Translational Medicine
PET scans reveal that tau predicts Alzheimer’s disease progression

Thanks to positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tau, which has only recently become available, researchers now report that tau tangles provide a good indication of cognitive decline in later stages of the disease.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Brain stimulation and imaging analysis of 17 volunteers 21-30 years of age finds that progressively anterior regions of the frontal cortex are involved in controlling progressively later stages of perceptual decision making, suggesting an organizational hierarchy in how the brain's frontal cortex controls perceptual processes, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Blood stabilization with silk protein

Researchers report the use of air-dried silk protein to stabilize blood samples without refrigeration.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancient trading networks and Arabian camel diversity

A study of modern and ancient camel DNA finds that the movement of ancient caravan routes may have shaped the genetic diversity of Arabian camels.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-May-2016
JAMA
Drug does not reduce digital ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis

In an article appearing in the May 10 issue of JAMA, Dinesh Khanna, M.D., of the University of Michigan Scleroderma Program, Ann Arbor, and colleagues evaluated the efficacy of the drug macitentan in reducing the number of new digital ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis.

Contact: Kylie O’Brien
kylieo@med.umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 10-May-2016
JAMA
Does breast cancer screening accuracy go down as time spent evaluating mammograms increases?

Longer time spent by film readers interpreting screening mammograms did not result in a reduced rate of breast cancer detection, according to a study appearing in the May 10 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Sian Taylor-Phillips
s.taylor-phillips@warwick.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 10-May-2016
JAMA
Increase seen in the BMI associated with lowest risk of death

In a study appearing in the May 10 issue of JAMA, Børge G. Nordestgaard, M.D., D.M.Sc., of Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark and colleagues examined whether the body mass index (BMI) value that is associated with the lowest all-cause mortality has increased in the general population over a period of 3 decades.

Contact: Børge G. Nordestgaard
Boerge.Nordestgaard@regionh.dk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 9-May-2016
Chinese Science Bulletin
The frontier issues for origin mechanism of cosmic rays

The origin, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays have always remained mysteries since its discovery of 100 years ago. The space-borne, ground-based underground-based experiments have been developed to improve the precise sensitivity of measurements and achieved some significant progresses. The cover story in 2016(11)issue of Chinese Science Bulletin will present these developments in detail.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.:11135010)

Contact: Guo Yiqing
guoyq@ihep.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 9-May-2016
CloudLab, a new system for making online video presentations

LabHipermedia, a spin-off with participation by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), has designed a technology that improves the learning experience of instructors and users who employ video as a teaching and learning tool.

Contact: fco javier alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 6-May-2016
Science
Antibody boosts immune response to HIV in humans

Two new studies reveal that administering a potent broadly neutralizing antibody that binds to HIV evokes a strong immune response in humans, and can even accelerate the clearance of infected cells.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-May-2016
Science
River shaping from floods happens in moderation

An assessment of rivers in the US suggests that although there is a relationship between increased flood size and erosion, the effect is most pronounced for moderate floods.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-May-2016
Science
Technique rapidly reveals individual gene function

Researchers have developed a technique using the gene editing system CRISPR to rapidly identify gene variants.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-May-2016
Science
A filter that shaped evolution of primates in Asia

By studying fossils from southern China, scientists have gained insights into how primates in Asia evolved to resemble the array seen today.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-May-2016
BioScience
Hydropeaking extirpates river insects

One of hydropower's purported benefits is its ability to use timed water releases to meet peak electrical demand. However, this practice can eliminate populations of insects that lay eggs near the river's edge, with potentially severe effects for ecosystems.

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Robotic surgery just got more autonomous

Putting surgery one step closer into the realm of self-driving cars and intelligent machines, researchers show for the first time that a supervised autonomous robot can successfully perform soft tissue surgery.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 276-300 out of 523 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]