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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 623 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix as a tissue engineered nerve scaffold

Bovine acellular dermal matrix can be made into a large amount of natural biological scaffolds with good biocompatibility and degradability for use in the field of neural regeneration.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 4-Jan-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Propofol and remifentanil affect NSC/NPC proliferation and differentiation

Intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) plays an important role as a signal transduction messenger during neural stem/progenitor cell (NSC/NPC) proliferation and differentiation and in the development of the central nervous system.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 4-Jan-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Age-dependent loss of cholinergic neurons and impaired learning in mice with TND

The tooth belongs to the trigeminal sensory pathway. Dental damage has been associated with impairments in the central nervous system that may be mediated by injury to the trigeminal nerve.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 3-Jan-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New version of common antibiotic could eliminate risk of hearing loss

On Christmas Eve, 2002, Bryce Faber was diagnosed with a deadly cancer called neuroblastoma. The 2-year-old's treatment, which, in addition to surgery, included massive amounts of radiation followed by even more massive amounts of antibiotics, no doubt saved his life. But those same mega-doses of antibiotics, while staving off infections in his immunosuppressed body, caused a permanent side effect: deafness.

Contact: Tracie White
traciew@stanford.edu
650-723-7628
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 2-Jan-2015
Science
Cholera toxin Aids gene swaps

The system that cholera uses to inject toxin into neighboring competitor cells is co-regulated by genes that prompt the bacterium to ingest and integrate new DNA into its genome, according to a study by Sandrine Borgeaud and colleagues.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Jan-2015
Science
Fat cells help fight infections in mice

Fat tissue plays a direct, protective role against bacterial infection, according to a new study in mice. These findings should be useful in investigating why obese and insulin-resistant individuals are more susceptible to bacterial infections, researchers say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Jan-2015
Science
Possible target against enterovirus revealed

Yue Liu and colleagues have revealed the crystal structure of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), and show how an antiviral compound might be able to stop it from infecting cells. EV-D68 caused a recent outbreak of mild to severe respiratory illness among children in the U.S., with more than 1000 confirmed cases since August 2014.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Jan-2015
Science
Is bad luck to blame for cancer-prone tissues?

Random mutations that occur in dividing healthy stem cells can explain the dramatic variation in cancer incidence among various human tissues better than hereditary or environmental factors, researchers say. This finding could help to explain why some tissues, such as lung, give rise to cancer far more frequently than other tissues, such as bone -- and it might also help researchers design more effective prevention strategies for different cancer types.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Establishment and evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

Establishment and evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 31-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Why is mecobalamin effective for peripheral nerve injury?

Why is mecobalamin effective for peripheral nerve injury?

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Studies on exotic superfluids in spin-orbit coupled Fermi gases were reviewed

The recent experimental implementation of synthetic gauge field in ultracold atomic gases has significantly extended the horizon of quantum simulation in these systems. In the 2015 (1) issue of Science China, a review paper discusses the recent progresses on the theoretical study of exotic pairing superfluids in ultracold Fermi gases with synthetic spin-orbit coupling. It demonstrates that the emergence of the various novel pairing mechanisms are direct results of unconventional single-particle dispersion spectral under spin-orbit-coupling.

973 grants from the Department of Science and Technology of China (Grant Nos: 2011CB921200, 2011CBA00200, 2013CB922000);Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Grant Nos. WK2470000006)

Contact: YI Wei
wyiz@ustc.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
New perspectives for investigating respiratory failure induced by cervical spinal cord injury

New perspectives for investigating respiratory failure induced by cervical spinal cord injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Roles of Schwann cell dedifferentiation in peripheral neurodegenerative diseases

Pro-demyelinating and axon-protective roles of Schwann cell dedifferentiation in peripheral neurodegenerative diseases

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Phage-based nanomaterials for regenerative medicine of the nervous system

Phage-based nanomaterials for regenerative medicine of the nervous system

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of raindrop impacts on sandy surfaces finds a quantitative similarity between liquid-drop impacts and impact craters formed by asteroids, allowing planetary science models of asteroid impacts to be applied to small-scale liquid-drop craters.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Transport of Fukushima radioactivity across the Pacific

A study tracing the transport of radioactive material from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident finds that cesium radionuclides Cs-134 and Cs-137 arrived on the North American Pacific continental shelf around June 2013. Damage to the Fukushima nuclear power plant following the earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan in March 2011 raised concern about transport of radioactive material across the Pacific Ocean to North American shores.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Comparing climate change assessment methods

Three predominant methods for assessing future impacts of climate change on plant communities show agreement in the direction of community development but differ in the magnitude of projected climate effects, according to a study. Researchers seeking to understand the changes in plant communities in response to a warming climate typically employ one of three methods: experimental warming, monitoring under variable temperature conditions, or monitoring along a spatially variable environmental gradient.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Seismic signals and major earthquakes

Regional monitoring of seismic signals may help localize the possible epicenter of an impending major earthquake, a study suggests. Major earthquakes such as the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan highlight the need for advance earthquake prediction and warning.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stickiness of gecko feet and adaptive simplification

Evolution can remove previously acquired morphological adaptations to confer survival advantages to a species, a study finds. Morphological adaptations such as the prehensile tail allowed species to rapidly diversify and thrive, but some innovations can impose functional constraints on behaviors such as locomotion.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Warfare and reproduction

A study finds that male members of the Nyangatom population who participated in livestock raids in their youth may experience greater reproductive success in the long term than non-raiders. The high personal risk of engaging in warfare has led researchers to investigate the benefits that may drive raiding behavior. To determine whether raiding afforded a reproductive advantage, Luke Glowacki and Richard Wrangham traced the number of wives and children of 120 male members of the pastoralist Nyangatom people of Ethiopia and South Sudan.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Retracing the emergence of H7N9 in humans

A study pieces together the evolutionary events leading up to the first human case of avian-derived H7N9 influenza. Since the virus’s 2013 emergence in humans, it has been linked to two outbreaks and at least 115 deaths. Phylogenetic analysis suggests the virus is a triple reassortment of H7, N9, and H9N2 avian influenza viruses, but it remains unclear how the prevalence and evolution of these three viruses gave rise to novel H7N9.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
JAMA Neurology
Report on remission in patients with MS 3 years after stem cell transplant

Three years after a small number of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) were treated with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy (HDIT) and then transplanted with their own hematopoietic stem cells, most of the patients sustained remission of active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and had improvements in neurological function, according to a study published online by JAMA Neurology.

Contact: Richard A. Nash, M.D.
Angie.anania@healthonecares.com
303-869-2557
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 30-Dec-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
How economic insecurity impacts diabetes control among patients

Difficulty paying for food and medications appears to be associated with poor diabetes control among patients in a study that examined the impact of economic insecurity on managing the disease and the use of health care resources, according to a report published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Contact: Seth A. Berkowitz, M.D., M.P.H.
cmaviles@partners.org
617-724-6433
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 29-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
A Novel Method for Evaluating Nerve Guidance Conduits for Peripheral Nerve Injuries

A Novel Method for Evaluating Nerve Guidance Conduits for Peripheral Nerve Injuries

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 29-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Impact and effect of the ECM molecules in peripheral nerve repair and regeneration

Impact and effect of the ECM molecules in peripheral nerve repair and regeneration

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Showing releases 276-300 out of 623 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]