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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 715 releases.
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Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Biomicrofluidics
Bacteria harbor secret weapons against antibiotics

Researchers from Princeton University in New Jersey describe how they observed two similar strains of E.coli bacteria quickly developing similar levels of antibiotic resistance using surprisingly different genetic mutations.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report experimental evidence for a long-suspected correlation between the fighting styles of the males of three species of rhinoceros beetles and the shape of their head horns, suggesting that variations in animal weapon shape might reflect structural adaptations for species-typical fights.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mantle updrafts and sources of intra-plate magma

According to a study, magma at volcanic sites within tectonic plates likely originates as a hot layer of the upper mantle rather than as a narrow buoyant mantle plume rising from near the Earth's core. Intra-plate volcanism is commonly attributed to mantle plumes, described as narrow, focused, hot upwellings of material from great depth.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Phonological cues in language familiarity

A study finds that phonological cues, in the absence of speech comprehension, may account for the Language-Familiarity Effect (LFE), in which a person can better identify and distinguish between speakers of his or her own language than speakers of a foreign language.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Parsing the genetic factors underlying cognitive performance

A method for predicting the cognitive performance of individuals based on other phenotypic traits may improve on certain approaches based on genetic analyses, according to a study. Evidence from twin and family studies suggests that individual differences in cognitive performance are partly attributable to genes, but the specific genetic variants remain elusive.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Urban reforestation and ozone reduction

Reforestation may offer urban areas a cost-effective way to control ozone pollution, a study finds. Despite decades of control efforts, ground-level ozone concentrations in many metropolitan areas continue to threaten human health. Previous studies have shown that forests reduce levels of ozone and nitrogen dioxide, an ozone precursor, but the financial feasibility of using reforestation to remove these pollutants remains unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Simulations of the Miller experiments

Precursors of amino acid molecules form in a simulation of primordial chemistry under the influence of an electric field, providing an atomistic explanation of the results of the well-known Miller experiments, according to a study. The Miller experiments reported that different mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, hydrogen, and other small molecules that simulate an early Earth atmosphere produced several amino acids after receiving an electric discharge intended to simulate lightning.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Intervention in 6 month olds with autism eliminates symptoms, developmental delay

Treatment at the earliest age when autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is detectable – in infants as young as 6 months old – significantly reduces symptoms so that by age 3 most who received the therapy had neither autism nor developmental delay, a UC Davis MIND Institute research study has found.

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 7-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Distribution of the dense molecular gas in the disk of M51

Most stars are formed in the dense molecular gas cores. The mapping observations of the dense molecular gas in the disk of M51 reveal distribution of the dense molecular gas in the disk of M51, improving our understanding of the star formation in the disk. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Physica, Mechanica & Astronomica (In Chinese) 2014, No.9.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11173059)

Contact: GAO Yu
yugao@pmo.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 7-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
How to reduce drag during flight?

Turbulence is the main source of drag in transonic flight. The skin friction can be effectively reduced by using laminar flow control (LFC) to postpone the transition from laminar to turbulent. This study about the effects of suction flux, locations and different icing configurations on the transition, has been published on Sci Chi Phys Mech Astron(In Chinese).

National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Zhixiang XIAO
xiaotigerzhx@tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
The future of ultrascale computing under study

Some two hundred scientists from more than 40 countries are researching what the next generation of ultrascale computing systems will be like. The study is being carried out under the auspices of NESUS, one of the largest European research networks of this type coordinated by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M).

Contact: javier alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Science
How ocean microbes respond to limited nutrients

Two new studies advance our understanding of how nutrient availability influences protein production by marine microbes. Depending on available nutrient levels in ocean surface waters, marine microbes like phytoplankton produce a variety of proteins that serve in important oceanic processes, acting as catalysts in nutrient cycling reactions, for example.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Science
A new formula for soft, shape-shifting materials

By placing liquid crystals on the surface of a soft, deformable fluid pocket, or vesicle, researchers have designed a new, tunable kind of shape-changing material that mimics some of the remarkable complexity of a living organism. Their findings demonstrate that the placement of topological constraints on active matter, like liquid crystals, which harbor internal defects that move around and align themselves spontaneously, results in structures and dynamics that aren’t available in conventional equilibrium systems.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Science
Greenland ice cores reveal long-sought temperatures

A new study of three ice cores taken from Greenland sheds more light on the temperature changes that gripped the icy island during the last deglaciation, approximately 19,000 to 11,000 years ago. Previous studies, which have relied heavily on the ratios of water isotopes in such ice cores, fail to explain exactly where and when Greenland’s temperature changed during this period -- and by how much.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Science
The coffee genome -- a perfect blend of caffeine, aroma and flavor

Researchers have sequenced the genome of coffee, shedding light on the evolution of caffeine in plants and providing insights into this popular beverage’s sought-after flavor and aroma.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Infant diet has lasting effects on immune system

The effects of breast milk on the infant immune system may persist after breastfeeding has stopped, new research in monkeys suggests. Understanding the effects of early diet on immunity may help researchers explain why some people respond differently to vaccines or are more vulnerable to infection or autoimmune disease.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
BioScience
Pesticide risk assessments seen as biased

The Environmental Protection Agency’s pesticide toxicity assessments often rely heavily on industry-funded studies and may omit research that could lead to different findings. The assessment process should be reformed in order to eliminate conflicts of interest and include a wider breadth of available information.

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
APOE and APOC1 are involved in cognitive impairment progression in Chinese late-onset AD

APOE and APOC1 are involved in cognitive impairment progression in Chinese late-onset AD.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Implact of dexamethasone on intelligence and hearing in preterm infants

Implact of dexamethasone on intelligence and hearing in preterm infants.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Microphysiological systems will revolutionize experimental biology and medicine

The September 2014 Annual Thematic Issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine is devoted to “The biology and medicine of microphysiological systems.” Papers by participants in the NIH Microphysiological Systems (MPS) Program describe MPS as in vitro models for bone/cartilage, brain, gastrointestinal tract, lung, liver, microvasculature, reproductive tract, skeletal muscle, and skin; the interconnection of MPS to support physiologically based pharmacokinetics and drug discovery and screening; and the microscale technologies that regulate stem cell differentiation.

Contact: John P. Wikswo
john.wikswo@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-4124
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
BioScience
Changing microbial dynamics in the wake of the Macondo blowout

Following the oil spill caused by the blowout at the Macondo wellhead in 2010, Gulf of Mexico microbial population dynamics shifted rapidly as numbers of oil degraders quickly increased. In addition, the spill provided an opportunity to study the newly described phenomenon of microbe-derived marine snow.

GOMRI’s Ecosystem Impacts of Oil and Gas Inputs to the Gulf and the Deep Sea to Coast Connectivity in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
JAMA
Study finds change in type of procedure most commonly used for bariatric surgery

In an analysis of the type of bariatric surgery procedures used in Michigan in recent years, sleeve gastrectomy (SG) surpassed Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in 2012 as the most common procedure performed for patients seeking this type of surgery, and SG became the predominant bariatric surgery procedure for patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study in the September 3 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
JAMA
Increase seen in use of double mastectomy, although procedure not associated with reducing risk of death

Among women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in California, the percentage undergoing a double mastectomy increased substantially between 1998 and 2011, although this procedure was not associated with a lower risk of death than breast-conserving surgery plus radiation, according to a study in the September 3 issue of JAMA. The authors did find that surgery for the removal of one breast was associated with a higher risk of death than the other options examined in the study.

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Puerarin accelerates neural regeneration after sciatic nerve injury

Puerarin accelerates neural regeneration after sciatic nerve injury.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Chinese Science Bulletin
Are human breast milk microbiome ‘neutral’?

Human breast milk provides the best source of nutrients for infants and should have played a critical role for human evolution and civilization. It contains hundreds of bacteria forming the breast milk microbiome or microbiota; most of them are beneficial, but some opportunistic pathogens also exist in breast milk. Guan & Ma’s (2014) [Chinese Science Bulletin, No. 22] recent ecological analysis is aimed at understanding the mechanisms of bacteria diversity maintenance, species co-existences and distributions.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (No:61175071);“Top Scientists & Technologists Program of Yunnan Province”

Contact: Ma Zhanshan
samma@uidaho.edu
Science China Press

Showing releases 276-300 out of 715 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]