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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 702 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
An inside-out vein graft filled with PRP for repair of a short sciatic nerve defect

An inside-out vein graft filled with PRP for repair of a short sciatic nerve defect

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Ultrasound imaging of chitosan nerve conduits that bridge sciatic nerve defects in rats

Ultrasound imaging of chitosan nerve conduits that bridge sciatic nerve defects in rats

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 16-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Cholecystokinin octapeptide antagonizes apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells

Cholecystokinin octapeptide antagonizes apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 16-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
HSP72 confers protection in retinal ganglion cells and lateral geniculate nucleus neurons

HSP72 confers protection in retinal ganglion cells and lateral geniculate nucleus neurons

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Dynamic culture of a thermosensitive collagen hydrogel improves tissue-engineered peripheral nerve

Dynamic culture of a thermosensitive collagen hydrogel improves the construction of tissue-engineered peripheral nerve.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Adipose derived stem cells and nerve regeneration

Current clinical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries predominantly relies on sacrificing a section of nerve from elsewhere in the body to provide a graft at the injury site. Much work has been done to develop a bioengineered nerve graft, precluding sacrifice of a functional nerve. This prospect examines the potential of adipose-derived stem cells to improve nerve repair assisted by bioengineered nerve grafts.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Science
Exhuming Afghanistan’s civilian casualty data, and its rare minerals

Despite the ongoing withdrawal of international troops from Afghanistan, civilian casualties in the country continue to mount as Afghan insurgents -- determined to see the country’s central government collapse -- persist in their attacks. Historically, calculating the number of causalities from any war has been difficult.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Science
Promiscuous RNA of the strangleweed plant

A parasitic plant that hooks onto the stems of other plants like a hungry vampire exchanges massive amounts of RNA with these plants, a new study reports. Species of Cuscuta, also known as strangleweed, get food and water from their various plant hosts using specialized organs called haustoria.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Science
Collective behavior in a thousand-robot swarm

With a clever combination of algorithms and physical design, researchers have created a swarm of more than 1,000 small robots that can organize itself into complex two-dimensional shapes without any human help. Such self-assembling robotic systems have normally been limited to dozens or hundreds of robots.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Science
Human influence on glaciers growing, study suggests

Over the past 20 years or so, human influence has become the strongest driver of melting glaciers, according to a new study. Ben Marzeion and colleagues, who report this finding, explain that the world’s glaciers have been melting since the middle of the 19th century, when the 500-year-long cold period known as the Little Ice Age ended -- and that their retreat has been due to a combination of natural processes and human impacts.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Science
To save crumbling sewers, replace chemicals not pipes

Changing water treatment practices could prevent the corrosion of concrete impacting many of the world's sewers, a new study reports. Sewer systems globally are corroding at an alarming rate and costing governments billions of dollars to replace.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Up-regulation of neuronal alpha-1 adrenoceptors after peripheral nerve injury

After nerve and tissue injury, inflammatory mediators could either directly, or through the induction of neurotrophic factors, trigger increased α1-adrenoceptor expression on neurons and other cells around the site of injury. In turn, activation of α1-adrenoceptors on fibroblasts and keratinocytes may trigger further release of growth factors and inflammatory mediators. Thus, an upward spiral of α1-adrenoceptor expression on these cells and on regenerating neurons could engender an adrenergic component of inflammation and pain.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Stem cells in the skeletal muscle promote the regeneration of severe nerve peripheral injury

Skeletal muscle derived-multipotent stem cells were transplanted for the peripheral nerve injury, having the irreversible long nerve gap, using acellular conduit bridging. Applied cells differentiated into all of axon support cells, and contributed to increased vascular formation, which is favorable for blood supply and waste product excretion, providing the sustained expression of neurotrophic and nerve/vascular growth factors. Then, over 94% of axonal regeneration was achieved during 8 weeks, and this was more effective (about triple) than healthy nerve autograft.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Sperm shield fends off microbes, helps preserve fertility

Athletes have helmets, drivers buckle up with seatbelts, and it turns out that moving sperm are protected too -- by a protein that forms an anti-microbial shield around the cells as they travel through the reproductive tract, researchers now report. The findings suggest that boosting levels of the protein, called human beta-defensin 1 (DEFB1) in sperm might help improve male fertility.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
New progress in long bone fracture evaluation using ultrasound

With the advantages of quantitative ultrasound, such as low-expense, portability (QUS), and no-ionizing radiation risks, ultrasonic guided waves can also reflect the geometry of long cortical bone and material information. A recent study quantitatively evaluated long bone fracture degrees with ultrasonic guided waves. This study, published on SCIENCE CHINA Physica, Mechanica & Astronomica (in Chinese), 2012, 44(7), provides new method for fracture healing monitoring.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174060, 11327405 & 11304043), the Science and Technology Support Program of Shanghai (13441901900) and the Ph.D. Programs Foundation of the Ministry of Education of China (20110071130004, 20130071

Contact: TA De-an
tda@fudan.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Science China:Life Sciences
Expressive suppression dampens negative emotion faster than reappraisal

It is a prevailing conclusion in European-American population that expressive suppression is unable to effectively reduce negative emotion and physiological arousal. A recent study in Chinese people showed that expressive suppression is not only capable of reducing negative emotion but also dampens negative emotion faster than reappraisal. This may be related to the Chinese culture which highlights "relational harmony and self-discipline". This study has been published in SCIENCE CHINA:Life Sciences (IN CHINESE) 2014, No. 6.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos.31170989, 31371042).

Contact: YUAN JIAJIN
yuanjiajin168@126.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Stem cell therapy for central nerve system injuries: glial cells hold the key

Stem cell therapy for central nerve system injuries: glial cells hold the key.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Treating Alzheimer’s disease with Yizhijiannao granules by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis

Treating Alzheimer’s disease with Yizhijiannao granules by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Morphological changes of GnRHR neurons in the rat preoptic area across puberty

Morphological changes of GnRHR neurons in the rat preoptic area across puberty.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
JAMA
Delay in correcting irregular cardiac rhythm from atrial fibrillation associated with increased risk of complications

A delay of 12 hours or longer to correct an abnormal cardiac rhythm from atrial fibrillation was associated with a greater risk of thromboembolic complications such as stroke, according to a study in the August 13 issue of JAMA.

Contact: K. E. Juhani Airaksinen, M.D., Ph.D.
juhani.airaksinen@tyks.fi
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
JAMA
Flexible sigmoidoscopy screening reduces colorectal cancer incidence, rate of death

Among about 100,000 study participants, screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy resulted in a reduced incidence and rate of death of colorectal cancer, compared to no screening, according to a study in the August 13 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Heather Woolwine
woolwinh@musc.edu
843-792-7669
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Changes in motor function in the unaffected hand of stroke patients should not be ignored

Changes in motor function in the unaffected hand of stroke patients should not be ignored.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Targeted thrombolysis strategies for neuroprotective effect

Targeted thrombolysis strategies for neuroprotective effect.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Neuroprotective effect of Tongxinluo: a PET imaging study in small animals

Neuroprotective effect of Tongxinluo: a PET imaging study in small animals.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study finds that the microbiome of Anopheles mosquitoes, particularly the Asaia bacterium, inhibits vertical transmission of the common arthropod symbiont Wolbachia, potentially explaining why some arthropod species remain uninfected by Wolbachia.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 276-300 out of 702 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]