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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 554 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
Science
No magnetic field for comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Rosetta reports

Based on magnetic field measurements from an instrument onboard the Rosetta spacecraft’s lander module, which touched down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko last November in the first-ever comet soft landing, this comet does not have a global magnetic field.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
Science
Species diversity key to grassland stability

New findings suggest that the preservation and conservation of Earth’s biodiversity might help to buffer ecosystems against environmental changes brought on by human activities. Specifically, Yann Hautier and colleagues show that diversity among plant species plays a key intermediary role in the long-term stability of grassland ecosystems.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
Science
Increased sanitation achieved using financial aid

A new study from rural Bangladesh -- the most densely populated rural area in the world -- suggests that financial subsidies for the poorest households in a village can improve access to sanitation for everyone in that village. These findings add to a growing list of evidence highlighting price as a primary barrier to the adoption of health products, especially in the developing world where about one billion people defecate openly and another 1.5 billion live without hygienic latrines.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
Science
Eye contact secures dogs’ place in human heart

Considering one’s dog to be a member of the family may have more merit than researchers had realized. A new study by Miho Nagasawa and colleagues suggests that the hormone oxytocin, which spikes in both human and canine brains when the species interact, operates in a neural feedback loop that likely strengthened the bonds between man and his “best friend” for millennia.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Chinese Optics Letters
Novel evaluation method of surface figure for large aperture reflecting mirror

The GSSM will be the largest flat mirror in the world with the elliptical-plano figure 3.594 × 2.536 × 0.1 (m). The traditional evaluation method will not be suitable for such large aperture plan mirror surface. A non-correlation sub-aperture stitching method based on frequency domain was proposed, and the quality of its estimates was analyzed by the project team led by Prof. Xuejun Zhang and Dr. Fei Yang according to their previous work.

Contact: Xiaofeng Wang
wxf@siom.ac.cn
Chinese Laser Press

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Sequencing tumor alone may misidentify cancer mutations

In perhaps the largest-scale evaluation of its kind, a study of 815 patients across 15 cancer types reveals that compared to genomic analysis of tumors alone, analysis of both tumor and normal tissue from the same patient more accurately identifies cancer-causing mutations that may have importance for relevant therapies.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study uses triple oxygen isotope ratios in hydrothermally altered rocks to reconstruct water oxygen isotope ratios from Precambrian snowball Earth glaciers, and finds that the water isotope ratios were similar to those found in Antarctica today, suggesting an Antarctic-like climate at low latitudes during snowball Earth periods.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rapid cancer diagnosis through diffraction analysis

A proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of rapid and cost-effective cancer diagnosis at points of care. Digital holography can help perform rapid, reliable, and unencumbered cancer screening at points of care, particularly in resource-poor settings.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Community vulnerability to tsunami waves

Communities may possess varying vulnerabilities to tsunami hazards, requiring tailored plans for effective and efficient evacuation, according to a study. Nathan J. Wood and colleagues evaluated the characteristics of 49 cities, seven tribal reservations, and 17 counties from northern California through northern Washington, an area threatened by potential tsunami waves from the seismically active Cascadia subduction zone.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Preference for women in STEM faculty positions

Science and engineering faculty at 371 colleges and universities across the United States selected female faculty candidates two-to-one over identically qualified male candidates, a study finds. Wendy Williams and Stephen Ceci conducted five randomized controlled experiments to test whether gender bias in hiring contributes to women’s underrepresentation in academic science.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Agricultural insecticides and aquatic biodiversity

Agricultural insecticide contamination of streams and estuaries frequently exceeds regulatory thresholds, according to a study. High levels of pesticide contamination in aquatic habitats can reduce aquatic biodiversity, but the degree of pesticide contamination worldwide has not been evaluated.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Formamide irradiation and prebiotic compounds

Irradiation of formamide in the presence of meteorite material can lead to the synthesis of prebiotic compounds, according to a study. Formamide, a common compound in interstellar space, is considered a precursor of compounds such as amino acids that form the building blocks of life.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
JAMA
Study identifies factors linked to greater adherence to use of anticoagulant

Among patients with atrial fibrillation who filled prescriptions for the anticoagulant dabigatran at Veterans Health Administration sites, there was variability in patient medication adherence across sites, with appropriate patient selection and pharmacist-led monitoring associated with greater adherence to the medication, according to a study in the April 14 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Mintu P. Turakhia, M.D., M.A.S.
650-849-1222
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
JAMA
Intrauterine exposure to maternal gestational diabetes associated with increased risk of autism

Among a group of more than 320,000 children, intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus diagnosed by 26 weeks' gestation was associated with risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), according to a study in the April 14 issue of JAMA. Maternal pre-existing type 2 diabetes was not significantly associated with risk of ASD in offspring.

Contact: Anny H. Xiang,Ph.D.
albert.martinez@kp.org
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Tradition is more important than education in determining participation European immigrant

The rate of participation in the workforce by European immigrant women is highly influenced by the traditional values that they bring with them from their countries of origin. The impact of gender norms and other traditional values is so strong that it is twice that of education, according to research carried out at la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), within the framework of their Chairs of Excellence, which include their projects with the support of Banco Santander through Santander universities.

Contact: fjalonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 11-Apr-2015
Review of Scientific Instruments
Potential new breathalyzer for lung cancer screening

Researchers from Chongqing University in China have developed a high sensitive fluorescence-based sensor device that can rapidly identify cancer related volatile organic compounds -- biomarkers found exclusively in the exhaled breath of some people with lung cancer.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 11-Apr-2015
Science Advances
Researchers test smartphones for earthquake warning

Smartphones and other personal electronic devices could, in regions where they are in widespread use, function as early warning systems for large earthquakes according to newly reported research. This technology could serve regions of the world that cannot afford higher quality, but more expensive, conventional earthquake early warning systems, or could contribute to those systems.

Contact: Leslie Gordon
lgordon@usgs.gov
650-329-4006
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 10-Apr-2015
Science
Aneuploidy from mothers linked to widespread mutation

Researchers have identified a mutation on a particular gene that is associated with maternal aneuploidy, or the inheritance of an irregular number of chromosomes from one’s mother, and they suggest that it might be surprisingly common in human populations.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Apr-2015
Science
Whole-genome sequencing of endangered mountain gorillas

Whole-genome sequencing of mountain gorillas, now estimated to number at no more than 800 animals worldwide, reveals how a dwindling population and inbreeding influenced these animals’ genetic diversity with consequences for their survival.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Apr-2015
Science
Americas connected earlier than experts thought

The Central American Seaway, which once separated North and South America by connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, may have morphed into a land bridge about 10 million years earlier than researchers thought, according to a new study.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Apr-2015
Science
Isotopes illuminate Earth’s largest extinction event

An initially slow leak of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere followed by a large, rapid injection of the gas delivered a one-two punch that acidified Earth’s oceans and caused the largest mass extinction in the planet’s history, researchers say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Soft, energy-efficient robotic wings

researchers from the Harbin Institute of Technology in Weihai, China and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), have discovered a new resonance phenomenon in a dielectric elastomer rotary joint that can make the artificial joint bend up and down, like a flapping wing.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Depolarizing wave drives sudden death in epilepsy

Seizures can generate a massive wave of electrical current that shuts down critical brain cells, leading to what is known as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), a new study in mice shows.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
BioScience
Could a dose of nature be just what the doctor ordered?

There is a well-established link between time spent in nature and better human health. However, the precise mechanism underlying this connection has been unclear, which has meant limited guidance for planners and policymakers. To address the lack of clarity, the authors posit a dose–response model for examining nature’s health effects. Such a model would allow for more finely honed public health recommendations.

Australian Research Council, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Climate Adaptation Flagship,United Kingdom’s Natural Environment Research Council, Australian National Environmental Research Program

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
703-517-1362
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Osteoporosis International
Osteoporosis-related fractures in China expected to double by 2035

The results of the first study using a health economics model to project osteoporosis-related fractures and costs for the Chinese population, shows that the country’s healthcare system will face a dramatic rise in costs over the next few decades. The study forecasts that the incidence and costs of osteoporotic fractures in China will double by 2035, with costs rising to approximately USD 25.58 billion by 2050.

Contact: Lei Si
Lei.Si@utas.edu.au
International Osteoporosis Foundation

Showing releases 276-300 out of 554 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]