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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 637 releases.
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Public Release: 9-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Overexpression of Notch1 in temporal lobe epilepsy

Notch1 signaling can induce astrogliosis in glioma. However, it remains unknown whether Notch1 signaling is involved in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. A recent study by Xijin Liu and co-workers from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China observed overexpression of Notch1 in the brain tissue of temporal lobe epilepsy rats.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
How to increase the survival rate of motor neurons after spinal root avulsion

A previous study showed that, 1 week after avulsion of the spinal nerve root, small motor neurons (< 500 μm2) negative for 27 kDa heat shock protein (HSP27) immunoreactivity died and only large (> 500 μm2) HSP27-positive motor neurons survived in the spinal cord ventral horn. This was followed by the enhancement of HSP27 expression in motor neurons observed after mild crush of the spinal nerve root.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Science
One-two punch to overcome drug resistance

Researchers have developed a dual-drug, time-delayed nanoparticle delivery system for treating cancer, a new study reports. Although cancer therapies comprising two different drugs are increasingly common, simultaneous drug delivery may not always be maximally effective and some types of cancer cells still develop resistance to such treatments.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Science
Fighting cancer with T cells that recognize mutants

T cells specific for a mutation expressed by tumor cells show anti-tumor activity in a patient with an epithelial cancer, a new report shows. Malignant tumors harbor genetic alterations -- a characteristic of which adoptive T cell therapies have taken advantage.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Science
New neurons -- forming and forgetting memories

Why is it so hard to recall memories from early childhood? New research suggests that neurogenesis, or the generation of new neurons, could play a significant role in this “infantile amnesia,” which occurs across a wide range of species, including humans.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Science
You are what your ancestors sowed

What your ancestors planted in their fields may contribute to how individualistic and analytical you are, a new study evaluating wheat versus rice farming shows.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Genome Research
Single cell genome sequencing of malaria parasites

A new method for isolating and genome sequencing an individual malaria parasite cell has been developed by Texas Biomed researchers and their colleagues. This advance will allow scientists to improve their ability to identify the multiple types of malaria parasites infecting patients and lead to ways to best design drugs and vaccines to tackle this major global killer. Malaria remains the world's deadliest parasitic disease, killing 655,000 people in 2010.

Contact: Jim Dublin
jdublin@dublinandassociates.com
210-227-0221
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Low hepcidin a mark of iron deficiency anemia in children

Measuring levels of the iron hormone hepcidin can distinguish anemia caused by iron deficiency from anemia caused by other conditions, a new study in African children reports. The findings could help public officials make more informed decisions about when to give out iron supplements.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Catena
Where nothing grows anymore

Geographers of the University of Jena are looking into the typical landscape of Tuscany

Contact: Prof. Dr. Beate Michalzik
beate.michalzik@uni-jena.de
0049-364-194-8820
Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Geniposide protects hippocampal neurons via the non-classical estrogen signaling pathway

Geniposide protects hippocampal neurons via the non-classical estrogen signaling pathway

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
rAAV/ABAD-DP-6His attenuates oxidative stress induced injury of PC12 cells

rAAV/ABAD-DP-6His attenuates oxidative stress induced injury of PC12 cells

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Shuganjieyu capsule increases neurotrophic factor expression in a rat model of depression

Shuganjieyu capsule increases neurotrophic factor expression in a rat model of depression

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
TAG-1 induces apoptosisrelated gene expression without triggering glioma apoptosis

TAG-1 induces apoptosisrelated gene expression without triggering glioma apoptosis

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 6-May-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences
Characterization of salt efflorescence on glazed pottery

The glazed pottery was gradually disappeared with serious efflorescence in the stage of history. One recent study found that the soluble salts contained 2%~5% in the total mass of ancient potteries such as NaCl, NaNO3 and aqueous CaCl2 were the substantial clause for the pottery efflorescence and decay. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences(In Chinese), 2014, No.4.

National Key Basic Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB720901), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51302302, 51232008)

Contact: ZHAO Jing
zhaojing@mail.sic.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
AMPK and inflammatory mediators are involved in postoperative cognitive dysfunction

AMPK and inflammatory mediators are involved in postoperative cognitive dysfunction

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
The Pael-R gene does not mediate the changes in rotenone-induced PD model cells

The Pael-R gene does not mediate the changes in rotenone-induced PD model cells

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Regulatory effects of glial cells on retinal synaptic plasticity

Regulatory effects of glial cells on retinal synaptic plasticity

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
A novel transgenic mouse model of Chinese Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2L

A novel transgenic mouse model of Chinese Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2L

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that circulating, cell-free RNA in human blood plasma might potentially serve as a noninvasive, alternative biomarker for a number of health-related conditions, such as pregnancy-related complications and Alzheimer’s disease.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Semiconductor sequencing might help improve fetal genetic testing

Researchers report a semiconductor-based DNA sequencing platform that might help increase the speed and reduce the cost of fetal genetic testing. Recent methods based on massively parallel sequencing have boosted rapid, noninvasive prenatal genetic testing for chromosomal copy number abnormalities called aneuploidies through the analysis of cell-free, circulating fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bacterial symbiont is efficiently transmitted through sperm

Voluntary behavioral techniques that are relatively easy to learn within a short time frame can activate the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and attenuate immune responses, a study suggests. Excessive production of immune molecules called pro-inflammatory cytokines can lead to conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Geoglyphs in Peru antedate Nasca lines

An archaeological site in Peru features mounds and linear geoglyphs likely used to mark the summer solstice and other cultural activities in an ancient society, according to a study. The earliest known settlements in Peru’s Chincha Valley were part of the Paracas culture, which existed from 800 BCE to 100 BCE.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Parsing Asian Americans’ superior academic prowess

A study testing the proposed explanation for Asian American students’ superior educational achievements, compared with those of white students, suggests that work ethic, not cognitive ability, might explain the observed ethnic differences. Asian Americans’ superior academic attainment, compared with that of white peers, has been variously proposed to stem from family demographics, superior cognitive skills, and sustained academic effort as measured by attentiveness and work ethic.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2014
Integrated Computer-Aided Engineering
An intelligent vehicle that can detect pedestrians at nighttime

Researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have designed a new pedestrian detection system for cars which works in low visibility conditions; the system is made up of infrared cameras which capture body heat.

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 5-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Genetic diagnosis can rule out a suspected Huntington's chorea patient

Genetic diagnosis can rule out a suspected Huntington's chorea patient

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Showing releases 276-300 out of 637 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]