EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
1-Mar-2015 20:28
Beijing Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Breaking News

Multimedia Gallery

Subscribe/Sponsor

Interviews

Events Calendar

Selected Science Sources in China

MOST

CAS

CAE

CAST

NSFC

CASS

CAAS

CAMS

RSS

EurekAlert!

Text Size Option

Language

English (英文)

Chinese (中文)

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 603 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Role of ganglioside in repair of sciatic nerve defects using cryopreserved allografts

Role of ganglioside in repair of sciatic nerve defects using cryopreserved allografts

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
OEC injection repairs complete spinal cord transection-caused motor nerve injury

OEC injection repairs complete spinal cord transection-caused motor nerve injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Science
The genetic road to a sweeter cucumber

How sweet domestic cucumbers were derived from their bitter wild ancestors is clearer now, a new study reports. Small molecules in plants shape important relationships between these organisms and their environments. For example, in the family Cucurbitaceae, which includes cucumbers, cucurbitacin molecules convey a bitter taste that helps ward off herbivores.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Science
Surface structure as the secret to super-repellency

Researchers have designed a surface capable of repelling any liquid, including fluorinated solvents -- the wettest liquids of all -- and they achieved this super-repellency without the use of coatings. Tingyi Liu and Chang-Jin Kim describe this technique for rendering many different materials super-repellant to both oil and water simply by altering the roughness of the materials’ surfaces.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Science
Forget about it

Why do people recall some historical events, but not others? For example, U.S. presidents once known by all U.S. adults -- Fillmore, Buchanan, and McKinley, to name a few -- are now barely remembered. Here, Henry Roediger and K. Andrew DeSoto show that retention of cultural knowledge is based on factors including the “recency” and number of past exposures.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Science
The genes help some mosquitos spread malaria

Two studies comparing mosquito genomes have begun to provide answers to a century-old mystery: why only some species of the blood-feeding mosquito genus Anopheles transmit human malaria. There are over 400 species of Anopheles mosquitoes, but only about 60 transmit the parasites that cause malaria in humans.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Nov-2014
Science
A long-sought look at the fungus among us

A massive genetic survey of the world’s fungi -- an often-overlooked group of organisms with important ties to human health and the economy -- reveals global patterns in fungus distribution and diversity.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Nov-2014
Science Translational Medicine
'Therapeutic reprogramming' corrects diseased human skin

Findings from three separate studies offer evidence that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be used to correct genetic defects in skin and treat epidermolysis bullosa, a group of rare inherited skin diseases. Epidermolysis bullosa patients are typically born with extensive blistering and patches of missing skin, and have extremely fragile skin for the rest of their lives.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Synergistic actions of olomoucine and BMP-4 for axonal repair after acute SCI

Synergistic actions of olomoucine and BMP-4 for axonal repair after acute SCI

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Ultrasonographic reference values for assessing normal radial nerve in normal population

Ultrasonographic reference values for assessing normal radial nerve in normal population

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
China Science Bulletin
Young scientist discovers new method to achieve ultra-narrow laser linewidth

Chinese researchers have discovered a new method to highly compress laser linewidth based on Rayleigh backscattering.

National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Tao Zhu
zhutao@cqu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
JAMA
Study examines FDA influence on design of pivotal drug studies

An examination of the potential interaction between pharmaceutical companies and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss future studies finds that one-quarter of recent new drug approvals occurred without any meeting, and when such meetings occurred, pharmaceutical companies did not comply with one-quarter of the recommendations made by the FDA regarding study design or primary outcome, according to a study in the November 26 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Annmarie Christensen
Annmarie.Christensen@dartmouth.edu
603-653-0897
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
JAMA
Full-day preschool associated with increased school readiness, reduced absences, compared with part-day

Children who attended a full-day preschool program had higher scores on measures of school readiness skills (language, math, socio-emotional development, and physical health), increased attendance, and reduced chronic absences compared to children who attended part-day preschool, according to a study in the November 26 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Andrea Cournoyer
acournoy@umn.edu
612-625-9436
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
PLoS Medicine
Obstructive sleep apnea treatments may reduce depressive symptoms

Treatment for obstructive sleep apnea with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or mandibular advancement devices (MADs) can lead to modest improvements in depressive symptoms, according to a study published by Marcus Povitz, Carmelle Bolo, and colleagues from University of Calgary, Canada, in this week's PLOS Medicine.

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Material and mechanical factors in cellular neurogenesis

It is now becoming recognized that other extracellular cues than soluble factors, such as material and mechanical cues, have a strong potential to induce cellular neurogenesis. This article reviews recent data on the material (chemical patterning, micro/nano-topography, carbon nanotube, graphene) and mechanical (static cue from substrate stiffness, dynamic cue from stretch and flow shear) stimulations of cellular neurogenesis.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Function of microglia and macrophages in secondary damage after spinal cord injury

>Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating type of neurological trauma with limited therapeutic opportunities. The pathophysiology of SCI involves primary and secondary mechanisms of injury.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Spice up your memory

Adding just one gram of turmeric to breakfast could help improve the memory of people who are in the very early stages of diabetes and at risk of cognitive impairment.

Contact: Glynis Smalley
glynis.smalley@monash.edu
61-408-027-848
Monash University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of kinship structures and language evolution among the Bantu people of Africa finds that rules governing inheritance and residence after marriage co-evolved as agricultural practices expanded throughout sub-Saharan Africa, challenging a previous theory stating that changes in residence rules precede other social changes.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Remote-controlled therapy with resorbable devices

An implantable device, constructed from degradable materials, has demonstrated functionality in mice upon remote activation and fully degraded without damage to tissues surrounding the implantation site, according to a study. The functionality of implantable medical devices is often limited by the necessity for follow-up surgery to maintain or remove the device, and by the availability of materials that can resist degradation without causing inflammation or rejection.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Social exposure in chimpanzees

Among wild chimpanzees, mothers of sons may be more gregarious than mothers of daughters, according to a study. Carson M. Murray and colleagues analyzed 38 years of data from wild chimpanzees in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, that were habituated to human observers and analyzed maternal subgrouping patterns among them to investigate why adult males tend to be more gregarious than females.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancient chicken domestication in northern China

Northern China may have served as an early center of chicken domestication, according to a study. The bones of chickens dating to more than 10,000 years before present have been discovered in China, but it is unclear whether the specimens are related to present-day domestic species.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Literacy and visual processing

Literate individuals display an enhanced ability to process visual stimuli during the early phase of visual processing, compared with illiterate or late-literate individuals, according to a study. Past research using functional MRI has revealed that the process of learning to read induces changes in the brain’s visual system, but it remains unclear whether the changes affect early or late visual processing.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Factors associated with bee decline

A study suggests that loss of preferred host plants may be a key factor associated with bee decline. The decline in populations of both wild and managed bees has provoked concerns over the likelihood of a global pollination crisis.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Explaining extreme Beijing haze

Beijing’s severe air pollution might be attributed to its traffic, industrial emissions, and meteorology, a study suggests. China has recently experienced unprecedented increases in haze pollution due to fine particulate matter (PM) across many cities.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Arqueología de la arquitectura
Biopolitics for understanding social regulation and control

People, as the biological beings that we are, can be socially regulated by mechanisms such as taxes, property or family relationships. This constitutes part of the social policy that the Roman government put into practice during its expansion throughout the Mediterranean, which left its mark on the eastern plateau of Spain, the historical Celt Iberian territory, as has been shown by biopolitical research that was recently carried out at la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M).

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Showing releases 276-300 out of 603 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]