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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 644 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]

Public Release: 7-Feb-2015
GSA Today
Ancient deformation of the lithosphere revealed in eastern China

Seismic investigations from the Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt in eastern China suggest that this region was affected by extreme mantle perturbation and crust-mantle interaction during the Mesozoic era. The Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt formed through the collision between the North and South China blocks, which produced large-scale destruction of the cratonic lithosphere, accompanied by widespread magmatism and metallogeny.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 6-Feb-2015
Science
California’s map of entrepreneurial quality

By focusing on the quality of start-up businesses rather than the quantity of start-ups in a given area, Jorge Guzman and Scott Stern have built a new map of entrepreneurial “hotspots” in California. The method offers a new way of defining and locating entrepreneurship, which could in turn help economists and politicians better promote entrepreneurism as a way to boost economic and social health.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Feb-2015
Science
Glacial cycles connected to production of ocean crust

A new analysis of the ocean floor across the Australian-Antarctic ocean ridge suggests that some glacial cycles are connected to the production of ocean crust, according to a new study by John Crowley and colleagues

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Feb-2015
Science
Termite mounds lead to "islands of fertility"

The presence of termite mounds in arid and semi-arid savannas and grasslands, or drylands, helps to stabilize ecosystems and buffer them against climate change, according to new research.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipack@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Feb-2015
Science
Adapting optogenetics to reverse cocaine behavior in mice

Borrowing ideas from optogenetics, which uses light to control neurons, Meaghan Creed and colleagues have developed a combination therapy to treat cocaine-induced behaviors in mice.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
China Science Bulletin
Discovery of natural gas hydrate in Kunlun Pass, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

There exist multi-layer natural gas hydrate layer underlying permafrost layer at Kunlun Pass basin, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, providing the scientific base for the develop and utilization of natural gas hydrate on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin (In Chinese), 2015, No.1.

The CAS action-plan for west development (KZCX2-XB-03), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (41101070, 41001038).

Contact: Wu Qingbai
qbwu@lzb.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Smartphones get smarter with health diagnostic dongle

A smartphone can now perform rapid diagnostic tests for HIV and syphilis, thanks to a new dongle, which was successfully deployed in Rwanda.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
JAMA
Study compares effectiveness of different transfusion strategies for severe trauma

Among patients with severe trauma and major bleeding, those who received a transfusion of a balanced ratio of plasma, platelets, and red blood cells (RBCs) were more likely to have their bleeding stopped and less likely to die due to loss of blood by 24 hours compared to patients who received a transfusion with a higher ratio of RBCs.

Contact: Rob Cahill
Robert.Cahill@uth.tmc.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
JAMA
Hospital readmissions after surgery associated mostly with complications related to surgical procedure

In a study that included readmission information from nearly 350 hospitals, readmissions the first 30 days after surgery were associated with new postdischarge complications related to the surgical procedure and not a worsening of any medical conditions the patient already had while hospitalized for surgery.

Contact: Bret Coons
bcoons@nm.org
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
U.S. FDA grants priority review to YONDELIS® NDA for advanced soft-tissue sarcoma

Madrid, February 3, 2015 – PharmaMar announces that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted priority review to YONDELIS® (trabectedin) New Drug Application (NDA) for the treatment of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS), including liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma subtypes, who have received prior chemotherapy including an anthracycline. Janssen Research & Development, PharmaMar´s strategic partner for the development of YONDELIS® in the U.S., submitted the NDA on November 24, 20141.

Contact: Carolina Pola
cpola@pharmamar.com
34-608-933-677
Pharmamar

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cooperation of migratory ibis in flight formations

Two genes associated with diabetes display altered expression in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and may serve as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis and monitoring of PD progression, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Potential biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease diagnosis

Two genes associated with diabetes display altered expression in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and may serve as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis and monitoring of PD progression, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Simulated synthesis of a graphene alternative

Researchers have simulated the synthesis of a structural variant of carbon called penta-graphene, which might outperform graphene in some applications.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Clearing hepatitis B infection

Established gut microbiota may play a role in the ability of adult mouse livers to clear hepatitis B infection, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Discovery of an approximately 1.8 billion-year-old deep-water marine sulfur-cycling microbial community that shares morphological, habitat, and physiological similarities with a previously discovered 2.3 billion-year-old community and with a modern-day community suggests that the deep seafloor environment has likely remained largely unchanged for at least 2.3 billion years, resulting in evolutionary stasis for the sulfur-cycling microbial communities inhabiting the deep seafloor, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Childhood stress and adult health

Stressful events during childhood may exert long-term effects on overall physiological functioning during adulthood, according to a study. Previous studies suggest that physiological strain may increase incidence of mortality and disease.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
New technique captures real-time diagnostic 3-D images

Researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the Chinese Academy of Sciences and other institutions are developing a technique which makes it possible to obtain diagnostic, three-dimensional images in real time. This enables scientists to instantly discover all types of processes ranging from how a fruit fly develops to whether a biopsy was correctly performed.

Contact: fjalonso
fjalonso@bib.uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences
Transparent soft PDMS eggshell created as step towards embryo lab on a chip

Creating in vivo 3D fluorescent imaging still faces barriers, although green fluorescent protein techniques have long been utilized rather well at the cellular level. Meanwhile, robust portable testing devices also challenge Lab-on-a-chip advocates. Now scientists in Beijing present a new conceptual soft PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) avian eggshell to target reaching these two goals. An “egg-on-a-chip” scheme is demonstrated via an egg mould-based design that enables investigation of an entire biological system in a miniature device.

This work was partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51376102).

Contact: Liu Jing
jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
Science
Making an optical Möbius strip

Thomas Bauer and colleagues show that it’s possible to create an optical Möbius strip by sharply focusing a laser beam and “twisting” its polarization properties. Möbius strips are 3-D geometrical structures that are notable for being a surface with only one side.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
Science
Air circulation limited by earth’s water cycle

If global warming leads to a more intense hydrological cycle, as many models have predicted, it may also reduce the circulation of Earth’s atmosphere, according to a new study. This finding suggests that storms could become more severe but less common in the future.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
Science
Why do numbers ascend from left to right?

A new study shows that newborn chicks associate low numerical values with space to their left and higher numerical values with space to their right. The finding suggests that chicks may utilize the same mental number line, or left-to-right spatial representation of numbers, that humans do.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
Science
Identifying credit card users with a few bits of data

It only takes a few bits of information -- things like where you bought coffee on Monday, or maybe where you returned a pair of shoes on Tuesday -- to re-identify you within an anonymized set of credit card metadata, according to a new report.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry
Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fine aerosol in Beijing, 2013

We have developed an enhanced analytical procedure to quantify 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fine aerosol by solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

国家自然科学基金资助项目(Nos. 21107061, 21190054)

Contact: Fei LIU
lfaye424@163.com
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Disease may impact choice of biomaterial for implants

Disease can have profound effects on the way a biomaterial performs in the body, a new study shows. Taking this into account, the researchers developed a model for selecting biomaterials tailored to two specific diseases, moving away from a “one material fits all” mindset toward a more personalized approach to biomaterial selection.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
JAMA
Survey indicates willingness of general population to donate tissue samples to biobank for research

A survey of nearly 1,600 individuals found that the majority were willing to donate tissue samples and medical information to a biobank for research and that most were willing to donate using a blanket consent, according to a study in the January 27 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Tom Tomlinson, Ph.D.
Sarina.Gleason@cabs.msu.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Showing releases 276-300 out of 644 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]