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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 614 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
New opportunity results complement curiosity’s

NASA’s Opportunity rover landed on Mars in 2004 -- more than eight years before the Curiosity rover touched down -- and new data from the mission is now showing that water stirred the rocks on the rim of the Endeavor Crater both before and after the ancient impact that formed it.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Form of estrogen may treat epileptic seizures

The sex hormone estradiol may be able to stop or reduce seizures associated with a severe form of childhood epilepsy, a new study reports. Treating epilepsy patients with the hormone could potentially improve the development of failing neurons responsible for seizures.


Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
JAMA
Biomarkers in blood show potential as early detection method of pancreatic cancer

Researchers have identified diagnostic microRNA panels in whole blood that had the ability to distinguish, to some degree, patients with and without pancreatic cancer, according to a study in the January 22/29 issue of JAMA. The authors caution that the findings are preliminary, and that further research is necessary to understand whether these microRNAs have clinical implications as a screening test for early detection of pancreatic cancer.


Contact: Julia S. Johansen, M.D., D.M.Sc.
julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
JAMA
Mediterranean diet associated with lower risk of peripheral artery disease

A multicenter study conducted in Spain finds that a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or with nuts is associated with a lower risk of peripheral artery disease, according to a study in the January 22/29 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Miguel A. Martinez-Gonzalez, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.
mamartinez@unav.es
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study reports that individuals whose breast tumors expressed high levels of the enzyme TBK1 responded poorly to tamoxifen treatment and had a high potential for relapse, and suggests that TBK1 may be a predictive marker of tamoxifen resistance and a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How zebrafish pigment cells form stripes

The signature stripes of the zebrafish reflect movement and interactions between pigment cells across the animal’s skin, according to a study. Although researchers have long noted that mathematical models can accurately reproduce many of the animal kingdom’s characteristic stripes and spots, the biological processes behind animal patterning remain largely unexplained.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cocaine use and social pleasure

Cocaine users show blunted emotional responses and low activation in the brain’s reward center during social interactions, according to a study. Drug abuse is associated with social impairments, such as a lack of empathy.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Human and rodent working memory

Rats might possess the ability to store and manipulate sensory information over short time periods, a study suggests. Rodents are valuable animal models to explore the neural basis of perception and cognition. But until recently, many of the remarkable abilities of rodents may have been overlooked, in part because of a lack of appropriate procedures to train the animals.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Outsourced manufacturing in China and air pollution over the western United States

An assessment of the impacts of trade-related Chinese air pollutant emissions on the global atmospheric environment attributes more than 20% of the pollution to the production of China-to-United States exports. Jintai Lin and colleagues quantified China’s export and import manufacturing emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and black carbon between 2000 and 2009 using a model constructed from economic and emission data.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mistimed sleep disrupts rhythms of gene expression in humans

A study finds that disruption of sleep timing can affect the circadian transcription of many genes in humans. Circadian clocks regulate the human body’s daily transitions from day to night and from wakefulness to sleep. But disruption of the timing of sleep and other cycles due to factors such as shift work or jet lag can cause far-reaching physiological and health effects.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Piezoelectric nanoribbons generate energy from organ motion

A study finds that piezoelectric nanoribbons can generate enough energy from natural organ motion to power implantable biomedical devices. Implantable electronics, such as pacemakers, heart monitors, and neural stimulators, are powered by batteries which have a limited lifespan and may require surgery to replace.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Microscopy method identifies pigments and techniques in paintings

An imaging technique using near-infrared laser microscopy may allow for 3D analysis of pigments and methods used in paintings, a study finds. Analyzing the materials used in a painting often involves collecting a small sample of the painting. To provide a non-destructive, 3D analysis method, Warren S. Warren and colleagues used pump-probe microscopy, a non-linear technique previously used in medical imaging.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Measuring global entrepreneurship

Counting billionaire entrepreneurs provides a better cross-country measure of entrepreneurship than more commonly used measures, a study finds. Magnus Henrekson and Tino Sanandaji examined measures of “Schumpeterian” entrepreneurship, exemplified by firms that are innovative, and that create and grow new ventures.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2014
The scientific explanation of why beer overflows

Scientists at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) reveal the physical phenomenon that explains beer’s rapid transformation from a liquid to a foamy state as the result of an impact. This research has applications in the area of naval engineering or in studies related to the prediction of gases in volcanic eruptions.


Contact: ana herrera
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Science
Coaxing out the sugar to bring on the biofuel

Thanks to a new technique for coaxing the sugar out of dry plant matter, making the biofuels we need to replace dwindling petroleum-based fuel sources may be less of a challenge, a new study reports. Because of rising oil prices, alternative energy sources like biofuels have grown in popularity.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Science
At last, the receptor revealed

Long elusive, the plant version of the receptor for ATP has finally been found, a new study reports, and it’s a lot different than the ATP receptor in animals. ATP is a universal compound present in all living organisms.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Science
No speed limit for soil in New Zealand’s mountains

Scientists working in the mountains of New Zealand report very high rates of soil weathering, contradicting previous studies suggesting mountainous soil weathering has a speed limit. Since the weathering process can pull carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, this find has important implications for scientists’ understanding of mountains as carbon sinks.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Science
Ancient pheromones keep queens in charge

When it comes to social insects, queens maintain their monopoly on reproduction by emitting chemical signals that render their loyal workers infertile. Now, Annette Van Oystaeyen and colleagues identify a particular class of structurally similar, queen-specific hydrocarbons that suppress the reproduction of ant, wasp and bumblebee workers alike -- and they suggest that these pheromones have been around, signaling fertility in social insects, for nearly 150 million years.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
BioScience
Alaskan caribou and ptarmigan migrations recorded

A ladder of 14 automated cameras has for the first time recorded the northward springtime migrations of caribou and ptarmigan in the foothills of the Brooks Range, Alaska. Some 40,000 images allowed researchers to estimate the speed of the animals’ movement and their behavior en route. The authors created “animations” from photographs taken every 15 minutes. Their approach, which minimizes disturbance to the animals, could be used to elucidate factors affecting migrations of other species.


Wildlife Program of the USGS Ecosystem Mission Area

Contact: Timothy M. Beardsley
tbeardsley@aibs.org
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Single cell protein scanner could aid personalized medicine

A new barcoding technology that detects hundreds of proteins on single cancer cells could potentially help doctors decide what combinations of protein-targeting cancer drugs to give to patients. Cancer cells can be identified by changes in expression levels of proteins that then serve as key cancer biomarkers.


Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Kidney International
Joslin finds metabolic clues to diabetic kidney failure

About 33 percent of people with type 2 diabetes suffer kidney damage that progresses to end stage renal disease (ESRD), at which point they require either dialysis or kidney transplantation. Scientists have thought that this kidney disease is driven by damage to the glomeruli, blood vessels in the kidney, which spill the protein albumin into the urine. Current treatments targeting the resulting "albuminuria" do not prevent kidney failure.


Contact: Jeffrey Bright
jeff.bright@joslin.harvard.edu
Joslin Diabetes Center

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
JAMA
Patients with mild hyperglycemia and genetic mutation have low prevalence of vascular complications

Chicago – Despite having mild hyperglycemia for approximately 50 years, patients with a mutation in the gene encoding the enzyme glucokinase had a low prevalence of clinically significant vascular complications, findings that provide insights into the risks associated with isolated mild hyperglycemia, according to a study in the January 15 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Andrew T. Hattersley, D.M.
a.t.hattersley@exeter.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
JAMA
Follow-up tests improve colorectal cancer recurrence detection

Chicago – Among patients who had undergone curative surgery for primary colorectal cancer, the screening methods of computed tomography and carcinoembryonic antigen each provided an improved rate of surgical treatment of cancer recurrence compared with minimal follow-up, although there was no advantage in combining these tests, according to a study in the January 15 issue of JAMA.


Contact: John N. Primrose, M.D., F.R.C.S.
j.n.primrose@soton.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 14-Jan-2014
Chinese Science Bulletin
Is there a logical way for scientific discovery?

Logical processing in human mind is also a psychological processing, so all logic is psychological one. A recent research created a model for scientific discovery in psychological logics. Then, the ways for scientific discovery would be explained and illustrated.


Tsinghua Independent Research Foundation (20111080990, 20091081226); CINACS (DFG-IGK 1247); Philosophy and Social Science Key Research Projects by Ministry of Education of China(07JZD0005)

Contact: CAI Shushan
sscai@tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 14-Jan-2014
Science China:Life Sciences
Discovering potential candidate genes and pathways for eating disorder

Eating disorder is a group of physiological and psychological disorders. The genes related to eating disorder were curated from published literature. Systematic pathway studies revealed that a key joint pathway may be the central signaling pathway of weight regulation, linking eating disorder with other relevant diseases such as obesity. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences (In Chinese), 2013, No.11.


863 Program of China (No. 2008BAI64B01) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31171270).

Contact: YAN Bei
yanbei@scichina.org
86-106-400-8316
Science China Press

Showing releases 276-300 out of 614 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]