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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 702 releases.
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Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study finds that the microbiome of Anopheles mosquitoes, particularly the Asaia bacterium, inhibits vertical transmission of the common arthropod symbiont Wolbachia, potentially explaining why some arthropod species remain uninfected by Wolbachia.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate, drought, and agriculture

Drought stress, often triggered by major climate fluctuations, influenced many agricultural settlements in the ancient Near East, but how the settlements handled the stress varied widely, a study finds. Collapse and resilience of ancient Near Eastern societies is tied to agricultural production.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
3D model of brain function and disease

A realistic 3D brain-like tissue that supports the sustained growth of functional neurons could be used to study normal brain function and disorders affecting the central nervous system, according to a study. The brain remains one of the least understood human organs, due in part to its complexity as well as technical limitations.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Trophy hunting and evolutionary selection in bighorn sheep

Trophy hunting likely does not induce a strong evolutionary response influencing body mass and horn size in bighorn sheep in Alberta, Canada, according to a modeling study. Trophy hunters, who target animals with coveted traits such as large bodies or horns, are thought to impose a form of artificial selection among bighorn sheep in Ram Mountain, Alberta, Canada, applying evolutionary pressure that disfavors rams with large horns, such as the prized 4/5 degree curled horn.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gut bacteria in infants

The population of bacteria residing in infants’ gastrointestinal tracts may depend to a greater extent on babies' biology, specifically their gestational age at birth, than on environmental factors, a study finds. Despite the importance of intestinal bacteria in health throughout life, little is known about how the newborn infant gut transitions from a state of complete or near-sterility to dense bacterial colonization within weeks of birth.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Laser pulse to identify chemicals from a distance

A single shot of laser light might potentially help identify explosives, hazardous chemicals, and biological materials from a safe distance, according to a study. Researchers have long sought techniques to remotely identify materials, from finding organic compounds on distant planets in the search for extraterrestrial life to detecting nitrates used in explosives from a safe distance.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Potential biomarker for post-traumatic stress disorder

Glucocorticoid receptor signaling in the blood may indicate an individual’s risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and could serve as an effective therapeutic target, a study finds. Only some individuals who experience trauma develop PTSD, highlighting the value of identifying biomarkers that could distinguish vulnerable from resilient individuals.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Cancer Cell
Stanford researchers uncover cancer-causing mechanism behind powerful human oncogene

A protein present at high levels in more than half of all human cancers drives cell growth by blocking the expression of just a handful of genes involved in DNA packaging and cell death, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
China Science Bulletin
Influence of the carbon cycle on the attribution of responsibility for climate change

A key issue of international climate negotiation is the attribution of responsibility for historical climate change and the corresponding obligation for emission reduction. The two state-of-the-art Earth System Models developed in USA and China are used to quantitatively assess the responsibilities of the developed /developing countries for ocean-land-atmosphere carbon storage, global climate warming and ocean acidification and the corresponding obligations for mitigation of climate change. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin(In Chinese), 2014, No.15.

National Key Program for Global Change Research of China (Grant Nos. 2010CB950504)

Contact: Dong Wenjie
dongwj@bnu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Selective verbal memory impairment due to left fornical crus injury after IVH

Selective verbal memory impairment due to left fornical crus injury after IVH.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside

Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Autophagy is a new target for treatment of neuronal injury in the hippocampus of VD rats?

Autophagy is a new target for treatment of neuronal injury in the hippocampus of VD rats?

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 8-Aug-2014
Nature Medicine
Cell signaling pathway linked to obesity, Type 2 diabetes

A Purdue University study shows that Notch signaling, a key biological pathway tied to development and cell communication, also plays an important role in the onset of obesity and Type 2 diabetes, a discovery that offers new targets for treatment.

National Institutes of Health

Contact: Shihuan Kuang
skuang@purdue.edu
765-494-8283
Purdue University

Public Release: 8-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Role of Notch-1 signaling pathway in PC12 cell apoptosis induced by Aβ25–35

Role of Notch-1 signaling pathway in PC12 cell apoptosis induced by Aβ25–35.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 8-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Microtubule-based strategies for promoting nerve regeneration after injury

Microtubule-based strategies for promoting nerve regeneration after injury.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 8-Aug-2014
Science
Microbes live in water, suspended in oil

Microorganisms can live in tiny droplets of water that are trapped in oil, according to a new report from Rainer Mechenstock and colleagues. Microbes can thrive at the boundary where water and oil meet in natural environments, where they play an important role in breaking down the oil.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-Aug-2014
Science
One-pot, carbon-free ammonia recipe

A new electrochemical method for making ammonia out of water and nitrogen could point to a way to make fertilizer from purely renewable resources. The typical method for making ammonia for fertilizers involves hydrogenating nitrogen, but the hydrogen used in the process consumes 3 to 5% of the world’s natural gas production and releases significant amounts of carbon dioxide pollution.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-Aug-2014
Science
Computer chip mimics features of real brain

Researchers have designed a computer chip with brain-like wiring and architecture that can perform sophisticated tasks in real-time while consuming very little energy. The chip paves the way for the design of computer devices suited to tasks conventional computer chips can’t do well.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-Aug-2014
Science
A real-life, origami-inspired transformer

Using flat materials and origami-inspired patterns, researchers have built a real-life transformer – a self-folding robot that, once assembled, can crawl and turn. Such a machine has various potential applications, including delivery to confined spaces, like collapsed buildings, for search and rescue missions.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Adult myelination - wrapping up neuronal plasticity

Adult myelination - wrapping up neuronal plasticity.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
New drug busts blood clots, without increased bleeding

A new drug busts up blood clots without causing excessive bleeding, a common side effect of current medications used to treat the clots that block passageways to the heart. Clot-zapping drugs like clopidogrel work by inhibiting blood cells called platelets.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
Science China:Life Sciences
How can frontal EEG lateralization predict individuals’ emotional flexibility?

Frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry could be considered as an index of the capability of emotion regulation. EEG measures of different emotion stimuli make it possible to explore whether frontal EEG lateralization predict individuals’ emotional flexibility. The results showed that frontal EEG lateralization predicted individuals’ emotional flexibility. Furthermore, Relative left lateralization was associated with flexible emotional responses. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences (In Chinese), 2014, No.6.

The National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Number: 2011CB711001), the Open Research Fund of the Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and Shang Shan Funding

Contact: Zhou Renlai
rlzhou@bnu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Relay strategies combined with axon regeneration: a promising approach to restore spinal cord injury

Relay strategies combined with axon regeneration: a promising approach to restore spinal cord injury.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Transplanting neural progenitors to build a neuronal relay across the injured spinal cord

Transplanting neural progenitors to build a neuronal relay across the injured spinal cord.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Pyruvate oxidation is critical determinant of pancreatic islet number and β-cell mass

Glucose is not only a major nutrient regulator of insulin secretion but also impacts on gene expression in β-cells. Using a mouse model of β-cell-specific knock-out of Pdha1 gene which encodes the α subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the authors demonstrated that mitochondrial metabolism of pyruvate derived from glucose not only regulates insulin secretion but also directly influences β-cell growth and plasticity.

NIDDKD, Canadian Institutes of Hlth Res

Contact: M.S. Patel
mspatel@buffalo.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Showing releases 276-300 out of 702 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]