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Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 534 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Internet video portals do not control views well

The majority of video reproduction portals on internet, with the exception of YouTube, have quite unsophisticated systems for controlling fraud in the number of views, and some of them even seem to completely lack such systems, according to research carried out at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) in conjunction with Imdea Networks, NEC Labs Europe and Polito.

Contact: fco javier alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
Science
Nearby supernova ashes continue to rain on Earth

Traces of 60Fe detected in space indicate that a nearby supernova occurred within the last few million years.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
Science
Genomic analysis of finches identifies genetic locus associated with beak size

Nearly 200 years ago, based on observations of finches in the Galápagos Islands, Charles Darwin proposed that a species may diverge in traits when competing for resources, and now, supporting this concept, a new study identifies a genetic locus that controls changes in beak size of these finches.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
Science
Giant dinosaurs hatched as mini adults

Analysis of a new dinosaur fossil suggests that the largest species ever known to walk the Earth was born with adult-like proportions, perhaps allowing it to be more independent than some other species of dinosaurs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
Science
For American youth, rich-poor gap in life expectancy narrowing

The life expectancy gap between America’s rich and poor is shrinking for the young, a new study reports.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Unconventional antibody defends blood vessels against sepsis

An antibody that defends blood vessels against sepsis can prevent mice from succumbing to the disease, a new study shows.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Apr-2016
Science of the Total Environment
Is your home harming you? New research highlights deadly effects of indoor pollution

New research published today in the journal Science of the Total Environment has highlighted the dangerous effects of indoor pollution on human health, and has called for policies to ensure closer monitoring of air quality.

Contact: Amy Sutton
a.sutton@surrey.ac.uk
44-148-368-6141
University of Surrey

Public Release: 20-Apr-2016
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Physical activity levels in China fallen by half since 1991, continue to fall with each generation

A new study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity has found that levels of physical activity for adults in China fell by nearly half between 1991 and 2011. Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA, and Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China, report that the decline was more pronounced in women than in men and each new generation had lower activity levels than the previous one.

Contact: Anne Korn
anne.korn@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22744
BioMed Central

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Scientists reveal the global evolution of the geomagnetic field over the past 20 years

The secular variation of the geomagnetic field derived from the core fluid flow dynamics inside the Earth. Several abrupt changes of geomagnetic field consecutively occurred within the past 20 years. These events were related to the waves inside the Earth’s core. Whether such events were independent was not fully understood. Now researchers in IGGCAS revealed that the recent abrupt changes were partly correlated and relevant to the global drifting motions of the geomagnetic field.

National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB845903 )

Contact: OU Jiaming
oujm@mail.iggcas.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
China Science Bulletin
Heterocycle-based luminogens with aggregation-induced emission characteristics

Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) has attracted much attention in recent years. Up to now, hundreds of AIE-active luminogens (AIEgens) have been developed, among which the heterocycle-based ones are rare, in despite of their possessed multifunctional properties. In a review published in Chinese Science Bulletin, Qin, Tang and coworkers summarized the recent progresses on the heterocycle-based AIEgens, and the challenges and prospect were also discussed.

The key project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China(2013CB834702)

Contact: QIN Anjun
msqinaj@scut.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
China Science Bulletin
Heterocycle-based luminogens with aggregation-induced emission characteristics

Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) has attracted much attention in recent years. Up to now, hundreds of AIE-active luminogens (AIEgens) have been developed, among which the heterocycle-based ones are rare, in despite of their possessed multifunctional properties. In a review published in Chinese Science Bulletin, Qin, Tang and coworkers summarized the recent progresses on the heterocycle-based AIEgens, and the challenges and prospect were also discussed.

The key project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China(2013CB834702)

Contact: QIN Anjun
msqinaj@scut.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
PolyU wins top prizes in Geneva’s Invention Expo

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has brought glory to Hong Kong by winning a total of 14 prizes at the 44th International Exhibition of Inventions of Geneva.

Contact: Hailey Lai
hailey.lai@polyu.edu.hk
852-340-03853
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New study finds shifted sleep-wake cycles affect women more than men

A new study from the Surrey Sleep Research Centre at the University of Surrey, published today in the journal PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) has found that shifted sleep-wake cycles affect men and women's brain function differently.

Contact: Peter La
p.la@surrey.ac.uk
0044-148-368-9191
University of Surrey

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters, generally considered too large to traverse capillary vessels, successfully transited microfluidic channels designed to mimic human capillary constrictions and blood vessels of model organisms by reorganizing from clusters into single file chains and then reassembling into clusters, suggesting that CTC clusters may have a greater role in tumor cell spread than previously believed, and that CTC clusters could be a potential drug target for reducing metastasis in patients, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cognition and sex differences in circadian rhythms

Shifted sleep-wake cycles might differently influence brain function in men and women, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Synergistic therapies may prevent drug relapse

Silencing specific brain circuits unleashes the robust and sustained anti-relapse potential of environmental enrichment, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination

Researchers report the economic and health impacts of a vaccine against human papilloma virus (HPV) in the United States.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Global shipping traffic and alien marine species

Researchers have developed a statistical model that can predict the spread of alien species into new environments.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gradual decline of dinosaurs before extinction

Statistical analysis suggests that the mass extinction of dinosaurs thought to have been triggered by an asteroid impact was preceded by the animals' gradual but inexorable decline over at least 40 million years, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
JAMA
Study examines safety, immune response of candidate Ebola vaccines

In a study appearing in the April 19 issue of JAMA, Matthew D. Snape, F.R.C.P.C.H., M.D., of the University of Oxford, United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a phase 1 trial to evaluate the tolerability and immunogenicity of two candidate Ebola vaccines, an adenovirus type 26 vector vaccine (Ad26.ZEBOV), and a modified Ankara vector vaccine (MVA-BN-Filo).

Contact: Matthew D. Snape
matthew.snape@paediatrics.ox.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
JAMA
New treatment for advanced melanoma shows promise

In a study appearing in the April 19 issue of JAMA, Antoni Ribas, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of California-Los Angeles, and colleagues examined tumor response and overall survival following administration of the antibody pembrolizumab among patients with advanced melanoma.

Contact: Reggie Kumar
ReggieKumar@mednet.ucla.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
Science
Antimalarial resistance to drug is not passed on to future generations

Parasites that develop resistance to the antimalarial drug atovaquone cannot pass this resistance on to offspring, a new study suggests. Atovaquone is a drug used to treat malaria, a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasites, but the parasites can develop resistance to this drug and there is concern that this resistance will spread, as it has for other antimalarials.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
Science
How parasitic worms help minimize inflammatory bowel disease

Intestinal worms beneficially influence the composition of gut microbiota in the presence of inflammatory bowel disease, a new study suggests. The findings provide important insights into how intestinal worms, or helminths, manipulate the gut microbiota in a way that is beneficial for its host.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
Science
Severe reduction in thermal tolerance projected for great barrier reef

Corals within Great Barrier Reef (GBR) have developed a thermal tolerance mechanism to adapt to sharp increases in sea surface temperatures, but near-future temperature increases of as little as 0.5°C may result in this protective mechanism being lost, a new study finds.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Apr-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Antioxidants in antidiabetic drugs may fuel cancer spread, mouse study shows

Yet another study exposes antioxidants’ potential to fuel the spread of cancer—this time for antioxidants found in a specific type of antidiabetic medication.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 276-300 out of 534 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]