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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 535 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
JAMA
Physicians with highly educated spouse less likely to work in rural underserved areas

In a study appearing in the March 1, 2016 issue of JAMA, Douglas O. Staiger, Ph.D., of Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., and colleagues examined the prevalence of physicians with highly educated spouses and whether having such a spouse was associated with working in rural underserved areas.

Contact: Amy Olson
Amy.D.Olson@dartmouth.edu
603-646-3274
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
JAMA
Study compares effectiveness of insulin regimens for patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes

In a study appearing in the March 1, 2016 issue of JAMA, John B. Buse, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, and colleagues compared the outcomes of once-daily injection of basal insulin (glargine) vs a once-daily injection of the combination of basal insulin degludec and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
984-974-1915
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
JAMA
Severe anemia associated with increased risk of serious intestinal disorder among VLBW infants

Ravi M. Patel, M.D., M.Sc., of the Emory University School of Medicine & Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, and colleagues examined whether red blood cell transfusion and severe anemia were associated with the rate of necrotizing enterocolitis (an acute, life-threatening, inflammatory disease occurring in the intestines of premature infants) among very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants. The study appears in the March 1, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Melva Robertson
melva.robertson@emory.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Science China:Life Sciences
A new evolutionary hypothesis solving the 'matrilineal puzzle' in human societies

Human families are very diverse, showing a wide range of residence patterns, among them 17% are matrilineal societies. The evolution of matrliny is a puzzle, it is not clear why males tolerate a system that favours investment in their sister’s rather than their own offspring. Based on evolutionary theories, scientists suggested a new hypothesis for a matrilineal bias in male investment, which is that working for sisters can evolve when female kin breed communally.

‘Hundred Talents Program’ of the Chinese Academy of Sciences;National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC31270439, 11471311);The British Academy (IPM120180);European Reseach Concil (AdG249347)

Contact: TAO Yi
Yitao@ioz.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Nano Research
Small-sized tungsten nitride anchoring into a 3-D CNT-rGO framework as a superior bifunctional catalyst for the methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions

A fancy 3-D WN/CNT-rGO hybrid has been constructed. The advantages of hybrid, including the good contact of Pt and WN is favorable to develop the synergistic effect between Pt and WN, good conductivity for fast charge-transfer and larger, accessible pores for easy mass-transfer, make the material large potential as promising materials for the catalytic application.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
BioScience
Nitrogen is a neglected threat to biodiversity

Nitrogen pollution is a recognized threat to sensitive species and ecosystems. However, the means and severity of the damage are elusive, hampering efforts to manage this worldwide contaminant.

Kearney Foundation for Soil Science

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@gmail.com
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

According to a study of 64 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, the endocannabinoid palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) reduced the desensitization of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors to repeated ACh applications in muscle membranes from ALS patients, and patients treated with PEA exhibited slower decay of respiratory function than untreated patients.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Chondrule formation in the early Solar System

Researchers report isotopic evidence for how chondrules formed. Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules that are a major component of a class of meteorites called chondrites.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Food safety risk from Fukushima accident

Marine species currently face a low risk of contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident, a study finds. Earthquake and tsunami damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 released large quantities of radioisotopes into the atmosphere and the Pacific Ocean.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Market-driven regulations and deforestation

Researchers report that voluntary, market-driven agreements between corporations and environmental nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) can help reduce deforestation.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Bulletin of the World Health Organization
People in world's poorest countries missing out on surgery

The volume of surgery has increased globally over the last decade but wide disparities in access to surgery persist between rich and poor countries, according to a study published today in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization. The authors, based in the United States of America, found that an estimated 312.9 million operations took place globally in 2012, an increase of 38% from the estimated 226.4 million operations that occurred in 2004.

Contact: Fiona Fleck
fleckf@who.int
41-227-911-897
Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Public Release: 29-Feb-2016
Nano Research
Effect of defects on photocatalytic activity of rutile TiO2 nanorods

Rutile TiO2 nanorods with different kinds of oxygen vacancies are prepared by using TiN as reaction precursor through hydrothermal reaction and surface reduction treatment. Oxygen vacancies with suitable concentration could effectively promote the charge separation and enhance the photocatalytic activity. Overall the photocatalytic activity order is TiO2 < S-TiO2-x

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 27-Feb-2016
Science Advances
New research unveils graphene ‘moth eyes’ to power future smart technologies

New research published today in Science Advances has shown how graphene can be manipulated to create the most light-absorbent material for its weight, to date. This nanometre-thin material will enable future applications such as ‘smart wallpaper’ that could generate electricity from waste light or heat, and power a host of applications within the growing ‘internet of things’.

Contact: Amy Sutton
a.sutton@surrey.ac.uk
44-014-836-86141
University of Surrey

Public Release: 26-Feb-2016
Nano Research
Ultra-stable silica-coated chiral Au-nanorod assemblies

We reported a novel chiral core-shell nanostructure with ultrahigh stability and amplified optical activity. In these novel chiral nanostructures, side-by-side assembly of chiral cysteine-modified gold nanorods serves as the core while mesoporous silica acts as the shell. These well-defined nanocomposites exhibited tunable optical activity due to the chiral gold nanorod assemblies. Impressively, the silica shell not only freezes the assemblies efficiently but also significantly improves their chiroptical performance in different chemical environments.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 26-Feb-2016
Science
Is disinfectant necessary for safe drinking water?

A difference has emerged between some Western European countries and the US regarding the use of residual disinfectants to offer safe drinking water. But who is right? In this Perspective, Fernando Rosario-Ortiz et al. compare the different approaches.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Feb-2016
Science
Leaf quality drives forests’ ability to absorb carbon

Leaf quality, rather than leaf abundance, drives seasonal fluxes of carbon dioxide in tropical regions, a new study reveals.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Feb-2016
Science
Antibodies eliminate Ebola symptoms five days after infection

Researchers have harvested two monoclonal antibodies from an Ebola survivor, one of which was so effective at subduing the virus that nonhuman primates given the treatment five days after infection experienced nearly complete protection.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Feb-2016
Science
Well blowout temporarily doubles Los Angeles’s methane leak rate

A new study provides one of the first quantitative estimates of the methane leak rate from the blowout of a well in California in 2015, suggesting that methane emissions from this event temporarily doubled those of all other sources in the entire Los Angeles Basin.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
The mysterious iron nodules on Mars

The sediments on the surface of Mars bear important information on the history of liquid water and even life. A study from the University of Hong Kong find iron nodules called blueberries on the flat ground near Hamelin Pool of Shark Bay, Western Australia share some similarities with those found on Mars. Those nodules are made of locally fragmented rock particles never been sorted by dynamic processes, neither have them been buried for long.

Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (No. 703911P )

Contact: LI,YILIANG
yiliang@hku.hk
Science China Press

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Nano Research
Fabrication of flexible reduced graphene oxide/Fe2O3 hollow nanospheres based on-chip micro-supercapacitors for integrated photodetecting applications

Flexible integrated on-chip Micro-supercapacitors (MSCs) were fabricated with rGO/Fe2O3 hollow nanospheres electrodes, which not only showed superior electrochemical performance, excellent mechanical flexibility, but also can drive nanowire photodetector well, demonstrating the feasibility of the flexible integrated photodetector systems.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Unconventional treatment strategy controls -- rather than eradicates -- cancer

Can we learn to live with -- rather than kill -- cancer? A new study suggests that frequent, low-dose chemotherapy that keeps tumor growth under control may be more effective than standard high-dose chemotherapy that seeks to eradicate cancer cells completely.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
Children with mental disability and access to justice

Children with mental disability (intellectual or psychosocial) still face obstacles in accessing the justice system under the same conditions as other citizens. That is one of the main conclusions of a study carried out in ten European countries including Spain. Taking part in the study were researchers from the UC3M 'Bartolomé de las Casas' Human Rights Institute.

Contact: Francisco Javier Alonso
medios@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
Nano Research
Transforming bilayer MoS2 into single-layer with strong photoluminescence using UV-ozone oxidation

This work reports that single-layer MoS2 with a strong PL can be prepared by oxidizing bilayer MoS2 using UV-ozone oxidation. As compared to mechanically-exfoliated single-layer MoS2, the PL intensity of the single-layer prepared by UV-ozone oxidation is enhanced by 20–30 times. It is demonstrate that PL intensity of both neutral excitons and trions (charged excitons) can be greatly enhanced on the oxidized MoS2 samples. These results provide novel insights into PL enhancement of single-layer MoS2.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

In an electrical brain imaging study of 83 people during an implicit association test, the brain displayed the same sequence of neural processes when individuals associated outgroup words with positive attributes or negative attributes, but certain processes in the former case lasted longer than those in the latter, resulting in increased reaction time.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Dopamine fluctuations in alcoholism

A study suggests that brain dopamine levels in alcohol-dependent individuals increase during periods of abstinence.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 276-300 out of 535 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]