EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
23-Apr-2014 15:49
Beijing Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Breaking News

Multimedia Gallery

Subscribe/Sponsor

Interviews

Events Calendar

Selected Science Sources in China

MOST

CAS

CAE

CAST

NSFC

CASS

CAAS

CAMS

RSS

EurekAlert!

Text Size Option

Language

English (英文)

Chinese (中文)

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 616 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Honing early detection systems for hospital-acquired infections

Surveillance systems could help detect the early spread of healthcare-associated infections with the help of only a few sentinel hospitals, researchers report. Mariano Ciccolini and colleagues used recently developed mathematical models, as well as detailed information about patient movements between all hospitals in the closely linked national healthcare systems of England and the Netherlands, to simulate the spread of healthcare-associated infections among these hospitals.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
New biomedical diagnostics using personalized 3D imaging

Researchers at the firm 4DNature and the Universidad Carlos III of Madrid (UC3M) are developing a new technology, called helical optical projection tomography, which improves biomedical diagnostic 3D imaging.


Contact: ana herrera
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
The navigation and positioning performance of BeiDou comparable to that of GPS regionally

BeiDou regional navigation satellite system (BDS) also called BeiDou-2 has been in full operation since December 27, 2012. It is shown that the precision of BDS code and carrier phase measurements are about 33 cm and 2 mm, respectively, which are comparable to those of GPS, and the accuracy of BDS single point positioning has satisfied the design requirement.


National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41020144004, 41374019 and 41104022), and National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122501).

Contact: YANG Yuanxi
yuanxi_yang@163.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 26-Jan-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Geologic characteristics of the Chang’E-3 exploration region

Chinese researchers present topographic, geomorphologic and compositional characteristics of a 1°×1° (~660 km2) region centered near the landing site of Chang’E-3 using the highest spatial resolution data available.The relevant paper will be published on SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy 2014(3) issue.


National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41373066), the Key Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KGZD-EW-603), Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (SRFDP) (Grant No. 2013014513000

Contact: Guo Yuan-Yuan
guoyuanyuan@scichina.org
86-106-401-5835
Science China Press

Public Release: 26-Jan-2014
China Science Bulletin
Where did the sun come from?

In past decades astronomers have discovered several high-velocity stars in globular clusters, but no high-velocity star has been discovered in open clusters.A new study has discovered a high-velocity in open cluster M67, and it will provide clues to dynamical evolution of open clusters and the origin of the sun. This study will be published on CHINESE SCIENCE Bulletin(In Chinese).


School Foundation of Changzhou University (Grant Nos.1002121).

Contact: YAN Bei
yanbei@scichina.org
86-106-400-8316
Science China Press

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
Where’d you get that brand new gene?

Sometimes a non-coding DNA sequence can give rise to a unique, new (de novo) gene with its own specific role to play that may help in shaping the species. But, until now, researchers have not understood much about how this process works.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
Even without their vitamins, immune cells protect a host

Malnutrition zaps the immune system, reducing its strength and power, but now a new study shows that one of the most common malnutrition woes in the world -- lack of Vitamin A -- boosts levels of a key immune cell.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
Ancient dog cancer hints at first canine host

Researchers have provided the first whole-genome sequence of a transmissible tumor that originated in a single dog thousands of years ago and continues to spread among domestic dogs to this day. Their efforts shed light on the characteristics of the tumor’s original canine host, which they say likely resembled the modern Alaskan Malamute.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
Nothing sees color like the mantis shrimp

Why do the eyes of mantis shrimp have 12 different types of photoreceptors when four to seven are all that is needed to encode every color under the sun? A new study by Hanne Thoen and colleagues helps to solve this mystery by revealing that mantis shrimp rely on a unique, previously undocumented color vision system.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
New opportunity results complement curiosity’s

NASA’s Opportunity rover landed on Mars in 2004 -- more than eight years before the Curiosity rover touched down -- and new data from the mission is now showing that water stirred the rocks on the rim of the Endeavor Crater both before and after the ancient impact that formed it.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Form of estrogen may treat epileptic seizures

The sex hormone estradiol may be able to stop or reduce seizures associated with a severe form of childhood epilepsy, a new study reports. Treating epilepsy patients with the hormone could potentially improve the development of failing neurons responsible for seizures.


Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
JAMA
Biomarkers in blood show potential as early detection method of pancreatic cancer

Researchers have identified diagnostic microRNA panels in whole blood that had the ability to distinguish, to some degree, patients with and without pancreatic cancer, according to a study in the January 22/29 issue of JAMA. The authors caution that the findings are preliminary, and that further research is necessary to understand whether these microRNAs have clinical implications as a screening test for early detection of pancreatic cancer.


Contact: Julia S. Johansen, M.D., D.M.Sc.
julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
JAMA
Mediterranean diet associated with lower risk of peripheral artery disease

A multicenter study conducted in Spain finds that a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or with nuts is associated with a lower risk of peripheral artery disease, according to a study in the January 22/29 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Miguel A. Martinez-Gonzalez, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.
mamartinez@unav.es
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study reports that individuals whose breast tumors expressed high levels of the enzyme TBK1 responded poorly to tamoxifen treatment and had a high potential for relapse, and suggests that TBK1 may be a predictive marker of tamoxifen resistance and a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How zebrafish pigment cells form stripes

The signature stripes of the zebrafish reflect movement and interactions between pigment cells across the animal’s skin, according to a study. Although researchers have long noted that mathematical models can accurately reproduce many of the animal kingdom’s characteristic stripes and spots, the biological processes behind animal patterning remain largely unexplained.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cocaine use and social pleasure

Cocaine users show blunted emotional responses and low activation in the brain’s reward center during social interactions, according to a study. Drug abuse is associated with social impairments, such as a lack of empathy.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Human and rodent working memory

Rats might possess the ability to store and manipulate sensory information over short time periods, a study suggests. Rodents are valuable animal models to explore the neural basis of perception and cognition. But until recently, many of the remarkable abilities of rodents may have been overlooked, in part because of a lack of appropriate procedures to train the animals.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Outsourced manufacturing in China and air pollution over the western United States

An assessment of the impacts of trade-related Chinese air pollutant emissions on the global atmospheric environment attributes more than 20% of the pollution to the production of China-to-United States exports. Jintai Lin and colleagues quantified China’s export and import manufacturing emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and black carbon between 2000 and 2009 using a model constructed from economic and emission data.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mistimed sleep disrupts rhythms of gene expression in humans

A study finds that disruption of sleep timing can affect the circadian transcription of many genes in humans. Circadian clocks regulate the human body’s daily transitions from day to night and from wakefulness to sleep. But disruption of the timing of sleep and other cycles due to factors such as shift work or jet lag can cause far-reaching physiological and health effects.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Piezoelectric nanoribbons generate energy from organ motion

A study finds that piezoelectric nanoribbons can generate enough energy from natural organ motion to power implantable biomedical devices. Implantable electronics, such as pacemakers, heart monitors, and neural stimulators, are powered by batteries which have a limited lifespan and may require surgery to replace.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Microscopy method identifies pigments and techniques in paintings

An imaging technique using near-infrared laser microscopy may allow for 3D analysis of pigments and methods used in paintings, a study finds. Analyzing the materials used in a painting often involves collecting a small sample of the painting. To provide a non-destructive, 3D analysis method, Warren S. Warren and colleagues used pump-probe microscopy, a non-linear technique previously used in medical imaging.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Measuring global entrepreneurship

Counting billionaire entrepreneurs provides a better cross-country measure of entrepreneurship than more commonly used measures, a study finds. Magnus Henrekson and Tino Sanandaji examined measures of “Schumpeterian” entrepreneurship, exemplified by firms that are innovative, and that create and grow new ventures.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2014
The scientific explanation of why beer overflows

Scientists at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) reveal the physical phenomenon that explains beer’s rapid transformation from a liquid to a foamy state as the result of an impact. This research has applications in the area of naval engineering or in studies related to the prediction of gases in volcanic eruptions.


Contact: ana herrera
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Science
Coaxing out the sugar to bring on the biofuel

Thanks to a new technique for coaxing the sugar out of dry plant matter, making the biofuels we need to replace dwindling petroleum-based fuel sources may be less of a challenge, a new study reports. Because of rising oil prices, alternative energy sources like biofuels have grown in popularity.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Science
At last, the receptor revealed

Long elusive, the plant version of the receptor for ATP has finally been found, a new study reports, and it’s a lot different than the ATP receptor in animals. ATP is a universal compound present in all living organisms.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 276-300 out of 616 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]