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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 664 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 ]

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate change and the end of the Bronze Age

According to a study, population decline in Ireland at the end of the Bronze Age began around a century before an abrupt climate change in the region, suggesting that climate change may not have caused the population collapse. High-resolution archaeological and climate data enable re-examination of previous suggestions that climate change caused civilization collapses such as that of the Bronze Age society in northwestern Europe.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Battery self-charges from thermal energy

Researchers have devised a self-charging battery that generates electricity from low-temperature heat sources, according to a study. Industrial and environmental processes can create reservoirs of stored thermal energy, but despite decades of research, systems designed to reclaim the energy are inefficient, complex, and costly.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain response to a lost first language

A study of Chinese children adopted into French-speaking families reveals that the brain maintains responsiveness to Chinese in spite of discontinued use of the language. During early exposure to a language, the brain forms representations of sound stimuli that comprise the language, but it is unknown whether the brain maintains or degrades sound representations in the absence of continued exposure.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Edaravone promotes functional recovery after mechanical peripheral nerve injury

Edaravone promotes functional recovery after mechanical peripheral nerve injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Schwann cells from skin-derived precursors promote peripheral nerve regeneration in rats

Schwann cells from skin-derived precursors promote peripheral nerve regeneration in rats

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Why can bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells directionally migrate to the injured spinal cord?

Why can bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells directionally migrate to the injured spinal cord?

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
JAMA
Use of beta-blockers by patients with certain type of heart failure associated with improved rate of survival

Lars H. Lund, M.D., Ph.D., of the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues conducted a study to examine whether beta-blockers are associated with reduced mortality in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction (a measure of how well the left ventricle of the heart pumps with each contraction).The study appears in the November 19 issue of JAMA, a cardiovascular disease theme issue.

Contact: Elaine St. Peter
estpeter@partners.org
617-525-6375
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
JAMA
Implanted device shows potential as alternative to sarfarin for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation

Vivek Y. Reddy, M.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and colleagues examined the long-term efficacy and safety, compared to warfarin, of a device to achieve left atrial appendage closure in patients with atrial fibrillation. The study appears in the November 19 issue of JAMA, a cardiovascular disease theme issue.

Contact: Lauren Woods
Lauren.Woods@mountsinai.org
646-634-0869
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
American Public Health Association's Annual Meeting
Creating trust in the time of Ebola

One of the key reasons the Ebola outbreak got out of control in West Africa in the early days of the crisis was a lack of trust among community members, frontline health workers and the broader health system, suggests new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research.

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
IOF 4th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting
Osteoporosis International
5th IOF Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting opens in Taipei

Today, researchers and clinicians from throughout the region have gathered in Taipei for the opening of the 5th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting. The event, taking place from November 14 to 16, is one of the Asia-Pacific’s most important bone, muscle and joint congresses. It has been organized by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) in cooperation with the Taiwanese Osteoporosis Association (TOA

Contact: Rhonda Ng
iofap@iofbonehealth.org
International Osteoporosis Foundation

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Science
Immune response to bacteria cures mice of rotavirus

Researchers have discovered that a bacterial protein, known as flagellin, activates an innate immune response in mice that both prevents and cures rotavirus infection -- an affliction that causes severe diarrhea and kills about 600,000 children around the world each year. This particular immune response, which is only triggered by certain bacteria, might be effective in treating other viral infections too, according to the researchers.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Science
Deforestation -- making the world a wetter place

Removing trees from the world’s wetlands, such as swamps and lakes, makes those environments significantly wetter, according to a new study. But this phenomenon goes largely unrecognized, researchers say, because most studies of human impacts on the environment are not designed to look for it.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Science
The effect of global warming on U.S. lightning activity

As the world gets hotter, lightning strikes will increase by about 12% for every 1 degree Celsius rise in global average air temperature, a new study reports. Observations have shown that lightning occurs more frequently when it is hotter than when it is colder, but it is difficult to know how much more lightning we should expect as global temperatures continue to increase.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Science
Why male mammals kill infants of their own species

Male mammals kill infants of their own species when their social systems exhibit certain characteristics, like the possibility for females to breed in any season. This suggests that male infanticide is a consequence (not a cause) of the social structure in which males compete to reproduce.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Craniocerebral injury promotes the repair of peripheral nerve injury

Craniocerebral injury promotes the repair of peripheral nerve injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Entangler and analyzer for multiphoton GHZ states

GHZ state plays very importance role in quantum information processing. In the regime of weak nonlinearity, a new study shows an entangler for generating any one of the multiphoton GHZ states and an analyzer for multiphoton GHZ states. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy, 2014, No.11.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No: 11371005); Hebei Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos: A2012205013 and A2014205060); the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No:

Contact: Yan Feng-Li
flyan@hebtu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Oxidative phosphorylated NF-M protects spinal cord against ischemia/reperfusion injury

Oxidative phosphorylated NF-M protects spinal cord against ischemia/reperfusion injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
A cardiovascular system simulation model that can analysis hypertension and heart failure

The cardiovascular system simulation model is an effective approach to study mechanism of cardiovascular disease. This model has good simulation pathological condition of hypertension and heart failure. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences(In Chinese).

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61271334).

Contact: cheng xiefeng
chengxf@njupt.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
Mechanism of fair and efficient allocation for discrete resources

Under the allocation of discrete resources, when the agents can not propose strict preferences, the classical allocation mechanism can not ensure that satisfies efficiency. For such allocation of discrete resources problem, the mechanism that proposed recently can ensure obtaining an efficient allocation. This study has been published on SCIENTIA SINICA Informationis.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61173180, 71071063 and 6127320).

Contact: HE Kun
brooklet60@gmail.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
A revolutionary technology for radio platforms-- digital radio frequency (DRF)

The analog RF technology has been being used since radio technology came out,which is the last obstacle of radio platforms digitalization. The core technologies of digital radio frequency have been developed recently,which makes it possible to realize all the software radio construction. This study has been published on SCIENTIA SINICA , Informations(In Chinese).

National defence Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31012000000001).

Contact: YAO FuQaing
yaofuqiang63@126.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Proteins in semen may explain microbicide clinical trial failure

Protein fragments found in semen enhance HIV infection and reduce the anti-HIV effectiveness of microbicides, researchers report. The findings may help explain why microbicides have failed to protect against HIV in most clinical trials.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
JAMA
Study examines life expectancy among patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and cirrhosis

Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis who attained sustained virological response (SVR) had survival comparable with that of the general population, whereas patients who did not attain SVR had reduced survival, according to a study in the November 12 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Adriaan J. van der Meer, M.D., Ph.D.
a.vandermeer@erasmusmc.nl
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
JAMA
Administration of Tdap vaccine during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery, small birth size

Among approximately 26,000 women, receipt of the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine during pregnancy was not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery or small-for-gestational-age birth or with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, although a small increased risk of being diagnosed with chorioamnionitis (an inflammation of the membranes that surround the fetus) was observed, according to a study in the November 12 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Patricia Lund
Patricia.A.Lund@healthpartners.com
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Ginsenoside Rd inhibits neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury

Ginsenoside Rd inhibits neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
BMSCs repair spinal cord I/R injury by promoting axonal growth and anti-autophagy

BMSCs repair spinal cord I/R injury by promoting axonal growth and anti-autophagy

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Showing releases 251-275 out of 664 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 ]