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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 708 releases.
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Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
Global health special issue

For this special issue, the editors of Science have invited experts to weigh in on some of the greatest challenges to the global health landscape, and the technologies and strategies influencing positive change. An Editorial, an Opinion, and 11 Perspectives compliment a special package of news.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
Warming, not instability, caused cce sheet collapse

In 2002, when the massive Larsen-B Ice Shelf in Antarctica splintered and collapsed, it was because of warming from above rather than from instability in the ice below, a new study reports. This finding will surprise scientists who thought that the shelf’s disintegration occurred primarily due to the thinning of the ice shelf and the loss of support by the seafloor beneath it.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
Phone app explores people’s experiences with morality

By using a smart phone app to track the moral acts people experience in daily life, scientists have made discoveries into how engaging in such acts influences people’s happiness and sense of purpose and how their moral values are shaped by influences like political ideology and religion.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
New fossils reveal dino’s aquatic adaptations

It turns out that Spinosaurus aegyptiacus -- a meat-eating dinosaur, bigger than Tyrannosaurus rex -- was a fantastic swimmer. Ever since the first fossils of S. aegyptiacus were examined, the dinosaur has been considered an oddity.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Networking can make some feel 'dirty,' says new study

Toronto – If schmoozing for work leaves you with a certain "ick" factor, that's not just awkwardness you're feeling.

Professional networking can create feelings of moral impurity and physical dirtiness, shows a new study.

Contact: Ken McGuffin
Mcguffin@Rotman.Utoronto.Ca
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Science China:Life Sciences
Special Issue: national key laboratory of crop genetic improvement

The Special Issue of National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement was published in Science China Vitae No. 8, 2014 in the “Column for Well-known Universities and Institutes in China”, introducing research progress of this laboratory in the areas of field crops including rice, rape, maize, and cotton.

Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, National Science and Technology Major Project for Transgenic New Species Breeding, National High Technology Research and Development Program, and National Basic Program of China

Contact: Lu Shan
lushan@scichina.org
Science China Press

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Global health: The challenges ahead

A collection of Commentaries, Perspectives and Reviews takes the pulse of a range of challenges that lay ahead for global health in the face of stagnating budgets.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
A system that facilitates malware identification in smartphones

Researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have developed a tool to help security analysts protect markets and users from malware. This system allows a large number of apps to be analyzed in order to determine the malware’s origins and family.

Contact: javier alonos
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
JAMA
Reanalyses of data from RCTs can lead to different conclusions

Although only a small number of reanalyses of data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been published, an examination of those that have been conducted finds that about one-third led to changes in findings that implied conclusions different from those of the original article regarding the types and number of patients who should be treated, according to a study in the September 10 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
JAMA
Long-term follow-up shows benefit of

Ten-year follow-up of children who have been taking statin therapy for an inherited cholesterol disorder showed benefit on a measure of atherosclerosis, although levels of low-density lipoprotein suggested that stronger or earlier initiation of statin therapy may be warranted, according to a study in the September 10 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Barbara A. Hutten, Ph.D., M.Sc.
b.a.hutten@amc.uva.nl
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
China Science Bulletin
Identification of trench oil: A new approach based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

It's a big challenge that has in a long time baffled scientists to identify trench oil in direct and quick way. A recent study for this problem using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology may have achieved a solution. This study shows that edible oil and trench oil can be identified efficiently and quickly by using their characteristic spectral features. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin(In Chinese), 2014, No.21.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175035), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. DUT12ZD(G)01) , Mmlab research project (DP1051208).

Contact: Ding Hongbin
hding@dlut.edu.cn
041-184-706-730
Science China Press

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Biomicrofluidics
Bacteria harbor secret weapons against antibiotics

Researchers from Princeton University in New Jersey describe how they observed two similar strains of E.coli bacteria quickly developing similar levels of antibiotic resistance using surprisingly different genetic mutations.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report experimental evidence for a long-suspected correlation between the fighting styles of the males of three species of rhinoceros beetles and the shape of their head horns, suggesting that variations in animal weapon shape might reflect structural adaptations for species-typical fights.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mantle updrafts and sources of intra-plate magma

According to a study, magma at volcanic sites within tectonic plates likely originates as a hot layer of the upper mantle rather than as a narrow buoyant mantle plume rising from near the Earth's core. Intra-plate volcanism is commonly attributed to mantle plumes, described as narrow, focused, hot upwellings of material from great depth.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Phonological cues in language familiarity

A study finds that phonological cues, in the absence of speech comprehension, may account for the Language-Familiarity Effect (LFE), in which a person can better identify and distinguish between speakers of his or her own language than speakers of a foreign language.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Parsing the genetic factors underlying cognitive performance

A method for predicting the cognitive performance of individuals based on other phenotypic traits may improve on certain approaches based on genetic analyses, according to a study. Evidence from twin and family studies suggests that individual differences in cognitive performance are partly attributable to genes, but the specific genetic variants remain elusive.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Urban reforestation and ozone reduction

Reforestation may offer urban areas a cost-effective way to control ozone pollution, a study finds. Despite decades of control efforts, ground-level ozone concentrations in many metropolitan areas continue to threaten human health. Previous studies have shown that forests reduce levels of ozone and nitrogen dioxide, an ozone precursor, but the financial feasibility of using reforestation to remove these pollutants remains unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Simulations of the Miller experiments

Precursors of amino acid molecules form in a simulation of primordial chemistry under the influence of an electric field, providing an atomistic explanation of the results of the well-known Miller experiments, according to a study. The Miller experiments reported that different mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, hydrogen, and other small molecules that simulate an early Earth atmosphere produced several amino acids after receiving an electric discharge intended to simulate lightning.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Intervention in 6 month olds with autism eliminates symptoms, developmental delay

Treatment at the earliest age when autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is detectable – in infants as young as 6 months old – significantly reduces symptoms so that by age 3 most who received the therapy had neither autism nor developmental delay, a UC Davis MIND Institute research study has found.

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 7-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Distribution of the dense molecular gas in the disk of M51

Most stars are formed in the dense molecular gas cores. The mapping observations of the dense molecular gas in the disk of M51 reveal distribution of the dense molecular gas in the disk of M51, improving our understanding of the star formation in the disk. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Physica, Mechanica & Astronomica (In Chinese) 2014, No.9.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11173059)

Contact: GAO Yu
yugao@pmo.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 7-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
How to reduce drag during flight?

Turbulence is the main source of drag in transonic flight. The skin friction can be effectively reduced by using laminar flow control (LFC) to postpone the transition from laminar to turbulent. This study about the effects of suction flux, locations and different icing configurations on the transition, has been published on Sci Chi Phys Mech Astron(In Chinese).

National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Zhixiang XIAO
xiaotigerzhx@tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
The future of ultrascale computing under study

Some two hundred scientists from more than 40 countries are researching what the next generation of ultrascale computing systems will be like. The study is being carried out under the auspices of NESUS, one of the largest European research networks of this type coordinated by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M).

Contact: javier alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Science
How ocean microbes respond to limited nutrients

Two new studies advance our understanding of how nutrient availability influences protein production by marine microbes. Depending on available nutrient levels in ocean surface waters, marine microbes like phytoplankton produce a variety of proteins that serve in important oceanic processes, acting as catalysts in nutrient cycling reactions, for example.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Science
A new formula for soft, shape-shifting materials

By placing liquid crystals on the surface of a soft, deformable fluid pocket, or vesicle, researchers have designed a new, tunable kind of shape-changing material that mimics some of the remarkable complexity of a living organism. Their findings demonstrate that the placement of topological constraints on active matter, like liquid crystals, which harbor internal defects that move around and align themselves spontaneously, results in structures and dynamics that aren’t available in conventional equilibrium systems.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Science
Greenland ice cores reveal long-sought temperatures

A new study of three ice cores taken from Greenland sheds more light on the temperature changes that gripped the icy island during the last deglaciation, approximately 19,000 to 11,000 years ago. Previous studies, which have relied heavily on the ratios of water isotopes in such ice cores, fail to explain exactly where and when Greenland’s temperature changed during this period -- and by how much.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 251-275 out of 708 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]