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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 646 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]

Public Release: 23-May-2014
China Science Bulletin
Balancing strategy to lateral impact in a rat Rattus norregicus

The rat bends flexible body to absorb the impact energy when encountering the lateral thorax strike, while encountering the lateral abdomen strike through its side-sway and left leg supporting. Balancing strategy to lateral impact in a rat can be inspired to improve the robustness of bionic robot. This study has been published in Chinese Science Bulletin (In Chinese). 2014, No.13.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51375232), the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (Grant No. 2011CB302106) and the NUAA Fundamental Research Funds (NS2013094).

Contact: JI Aihong
meeahji@nuaa.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 23-May-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Chemistry
How to detect nitrite and nitrate in the urine simultaneously and rapidly?

A recent study found that CdTe quantum dots enhanced chemiluminescence from ONOOH-Na2CO3 system, coupled with the reduction of nitrate in the presence of copperized cadmium column to detect nitrite and nitrate in human urine without derivatives and separation. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Chemistry(In Chinese), 2014, No.3.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21077008) and Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (Grant Nos. NCET-11-0561)

Contact: LV Chao
luchao@mail.buct.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 23-May-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Analytical solutions of the configuration of large-scale formation

The configuration of the deputy satellite with respect to the chief one is expressed as formal series of the eccentricity of the reference orbit, in-plane amplitude and out-of-plane amplitude, then the high-order analytical solution is constructed by means of Lindstedt-Poincaré method starting with Lawden solution. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Physica, Mechanica & Astronomica (In Chinese), 20142, No. 6.

The National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834103);The National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012AA121602);National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11078001).

Contact: LEI Hanlun
hanlunlei@sina.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 23-May-2014
Science
New twist in evolution of flightless birds

Ratite birds, some of the largest flightless birds, live all over the world, and now a new study suggests that they dispersed to Earth’s far corners through flight, not because the splitting of landmasses forced their separation. It was only after separating, this study says, that most members of this group lost the ability to fly.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-May-2014
Science
Seismic secrets of Earth’s depths

Two new experiments leveraging sophisticated tools for analyzing seismic phenomena and the chemical composition of Earth’s interior reveal how deep seismic anomalies might be generated. The Earth’s interior is layered like a cake, each layer chemically distinct. The mantle layer, located in-between Earth’s hot core and its crust, is the most abundant.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-May-2014
Science
Special issue -- The science of inequality

In the wake of the Occupy movements, in which millions of people around the world took to the streets to protest social and economic inequality, an international conversation has emerged. Now, Science joins this ongoing dialogue with a series of Review articles and news stories that explore the human history of inequality and help to clarify its current state.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-May-2014
Science
Another piece of the malaria vaccine puzzle?

Researchers have identified antibodies in some Tanzanian children that prevent a replicative stage of malaria-causing parasites -- the schizont -- from bursting out of its hosts’ red blood cells. These antibodies reduced loads of the parasite significantly in mice and humans, and researchers suggest that they might be used in combination with others to create a malaria vaccine in the future.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-May-2014
China Science Bulletin
Development of ion mobility spectrometry and its application for detection trace explosives

Ion mobility spectrometry is widely used for detection of explosives in the field of airport and in the war against terror due to its satisfactory features: fast response, high sensitivity, good portability, easy operation, etc. A paper introduced the pricinple, classification and also their features of ion mobility sepctrometry,and so on.

National Natural Science Foundation of China;National High Technology Research and Development Program of China

Contact: Li Haiyang
hli@dicp.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 22-May-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
The latest development in detection biochips of label-free high-throughput and real-time

The analysis and detection techniques of label-free high-throughput are the demand of life science. The latest research results show that oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method can be used to label-free high-through put and real-time detect the biochips. The study has been published on Sci China-Phys Mech Astron, 2014, 57(4): 615-618.

National Key Basic Research Program of China (No. 2007CB935701)

Contact: LU Huibin
hblu@iphy.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Seismological Research Letters
Bacteria live in healthy placentas

A small but diverse bacterial community calls the placenta home. The findings, from a new study of hundreds of placentas taken from healthy women, uproot the long-held notion that the placenta is a sterile environment, and hint at an association between the composition of the placental microbiome and preterm birth (birth of a baby at less than 37 weeks gestational age).

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-May-2014
JAMA
Research identifies genetic alterations in lung cancers that help select treatment; may improve survival

Multiplexed testing of lung cancer tumors identified genetic alterations that were helpful in selecting targeted treatments. Patients that received matched therapy for lung cancer lived longer than patients who did not receive directed therapy, although randomized clinical trials are required to determine if this treatment strategy improves survival, according to a study in the May 21 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Mark G. Kris, M.D.
morgenwm@mskcc.org
646-227-3633
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-May-2014
JAMA
Antibiotics continue to be prescribed at high rate for bronchitis, contrary to recommended guidelines

Despite clear evidence of ineffectiveness, guidelines and more than 15 years of educational efforts stating that the antibiotic prescribing rate for acute bronchitis should be zero, the rate was about 70 percent from 1996-2010 and increased during this time period, according to a study in the May 21 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Jeffrey A. Linder, M.D., M.P.H.
jmaki3@partners.org
617-525-6373
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-May-2014
JAMA
Physical therapy for hip osteoarthritis does not appear to provide greater improvement for pain, function

Among adults with painful hip osteoarthritis, physical therapy did not result in greater improvement in pain or function compared with a placebo treatment, but was associated with relatively frequent but mild adverse effects, raising questions about its value for these patients, according to a study in the May 21 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Kim L. Bennell, Ph.D.
k.bennell@unimelb.edu.au
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 20-May-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
A high-efficiency aerothermoelastic analysis method

Because of the high flight speed of hypersonic aircraft, aerodynamic heating would clearly affect the structural stiffness, which would result in complex aerothermoelastic problems. In 2014(6) issue of Science China, a new aerothermoelastic analysis method is established in a paper. By using two-way coupling form and unified hypersonic lifting surface theory, high efficiency and accuracy are obtained.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11172025 and 91116005)

Contact: YANG Chao
yangchao@buaa.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 20-May-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
On quantification of the growth of compressible mixing layer

Mixing of supersonic flows is important for aeronautic and astronautic applications. The growth rate of a compressible mixing layer (CML) is a key parameter quantifying the mixing efficiency in a scramjet/ramjet engine. However, the objective measurement of it is still a challenge. A gray-level ensemble average method (GLEAM) has been developed based on the structure ensemble theory (SED), which reveals a nonlinear growth of CML from analysis of the experimental visualizations.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11172006, 10572004 and 90716008) and by National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2009CB724100).

Contact: CHEN Jun
jun@pku.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A spatially broad sampling method used to measure biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), the process whereby free-living or symbiotic microbes convert nitrogen to ammonium and nitrates useable by plants.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic similarity of spouses

Partners in a spousal relationship share a greater degree of genetic similarity than do non-coupled pairs of individuals, according to a study. Previous research indicates that individuals may select spousal partners with a similar level of education to themselves, a phenomenon known as educational assortative mating (EAM), but it is unclear whether spouses share greater or less genetic similarity than non-coupled pairs.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Monitoring air pollution and carbon dioxide at New Mexico power plants

Remote measurements of atmospheric pollution in the vicinity of major power plants may provide a method for air pollution and emissions monitoring, according to a study. Regulation of gases causing air pollution requires accurate assessment of the sources and amounts of the emitted gases.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Spanish conquest of Peru may have altered shoreline geomorphology

The Spanish conquest of Peru, which began in 1532, caused a rapid decrease in coastal populations and may have changed the northwestern shoreline ecosystem, according to a study. The Chira Beach-Ridge Plain in Northwestern Peru contains at least nine beach ridges, narrow sand dunes parallel to the shoreline that formed over the last 5,100 years from tectonic plate activity, El Niño cycles, sea-level change, and littoral zone processes, including sediment deposition and removal.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Black carbon contribution to Greenland Ice Sheet melting

Ash and soot from forest fires likely contributed to widespread Greenland Ice Sheet melting in 1889 and 2012, suggesting that future climate change effects may lead to frequent melting, according to a study. In July 2012, satellite imagery revealed surface melting over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet, the first widespread melting since satellite monitoring of the ice sheet began.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Kawasaki disease linked to winds from China

Kawasaki disease may be caused by fungal particles or toxins carried on wind currents from northeastern China to Japan, according to a study. Kawasaki disease inflames coronary arteries of affected young children and may lead to fatal heart disease.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wireless powering of implantable medical devices

A wireless device that employs midfield rather than near-field electromagnetic energy transfer may provide a means to power deeply implanted, miniaturized medical electronics, according to a study. Engineering advances have enabled the miniaturization of electronic medical implants, but methods for powering the implants have not kept pace.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mediterranean diet and heart health

Researchers have found a mechanism through which a diet that combines unsaturated fats with vegetables abundant in nitrite and nitrate, such as olive oil and leafy greens, may protect mice from hypertension. Philip Eaton and colleagues investigated the process by which nitro fatty acids, which are generated from the reaction of unsaturated fatty acids with nitrogen species, lower blood pressure.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bottom trawling may lead to deep-sea desertification

A study finds that chronic bottom trawling removes organic carbon from sea floors and threatens deep-sea biodiversity. Bottom trawling involves a fishing vessel pulling an open net that remains in contact with the sea floor. Bottom trawling is carried out deeper in the ocean now than at the beginning of the 19th century, due to declining near-shore fish populations.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function

The blood-brain barrier prevents xenobiotics from entering the central nervous system. Growing evidence indicates that neurotoxins, such as tributyltin, manganese and nanoparticles, may disrupt the function of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barriers.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Showing releases 251-275 out of 646 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]