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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 643 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]

Public Release: 20-May-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
A high-efficiency aerothermoelastic analysis method

Because of the high flight speed of hypersonic aircraft, aerodynamic heating would clearly affect the structural stiffness, which would result in complex aerothermoelastic problems. In 2014(6) issue of Science China, a new aerothermoelastic analysis method is established in a paper. By using two-way coupling form and unified hypersonic lifting surface theory, high efficiency and accuracy are obtained.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11172025 and 91116005)

Contact: YANG Chao
yangchao@buaa.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 20-May-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
On quantification of the growth of compressible mixing layer

Mixing of supersonic flows is important for aeronautic and astronautic applications. The growth rate of a compressible mixing layer (CML) is a key parameter quantifying the mixing efficiency in a scramjet/ramjet engine. However, the objective measurement of it is still a challenge. A gray-level ensemble average method (GLEAM) has been developed based on the structure ensemble theory (SED), which reveals a nonlinear growth of CML from analysis of the experimental visualizations.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11172006, 10572004 and 90716008) and by National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2009CB724100).

Contact: CHEN Jun
jun@pku.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A spatially broad sampling method used to measure biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), the process whereby free-living or symbiotic microbes convert nitrogen to ammonium and nitrates useable by plants.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic similarity of spouses

Partners in a spousal relationship share a greater degree of genetic similarity than do non-coupled pairs of individuals, according to a study. Previous research indicates that individuals may select spousal partners with a similar level of education to themselves, a phenomenon known as educational assortative mating (EAM), but it is unclear whether spouses share greater or less genetic similarity than non-coupled pairs.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Monitoring air pollution and carbon dioxide at New Mexico power plants

Remote measurements of atmospheric pollution in the vicinity of major power plants may provide a method for air pollution and emissions monitoring, according to a study. Regulation of gases causing air pollution requires accurate assessment of the sources and amounts of the emitted gases.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Spanish conquest of Peru may have altered shoreline geomorphology

The Spanish conquest of Peru, which began in 1532, caused a rapid decrease in coastal populations and may have changed the northwestern shoreline ecosystem, according to a study. The Chira Beach-Ridge Plain in Northwestern Peru contains at least nine beach ridges, narrow sand dunes parallel to the shoreline that formed over the last 5,100 years from tectonic plate activity, El Niño cycles, sea-level change, and littoral zone processes, including sediment deposition and removal.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Black carbon contribution to Greenland Ice Sheet melting

Ash and soot from forest fires likely contributed to widespread Greenland Ice Sheet melting in 1889 and 2012, suggesting that future climate change effects may lead to frequent melting, according to a study. In July 2012, satellite imagery revealed surface melting over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet, the first widespread melting since satellite monitoring of the ice sheet began.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Kawasaki disease linked to winds from China

Kawasaki disease may be caused by fungal particles or toxins carried on wind currents from northeastern China to Japan, according to a study. Kawasaki disease inflames coronary arteries of affected young children and may lead to fatal heart disease.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wireless powering of implantable medical devices

A wireless device that employs midfield rather than near-field electromagnetic energy transfer may provide a means to power deeply implanted, miniaturized medical electronics, according to a study. Engineering advances have enabled the miniaturization of electronic medical implants, but methods for powering the implants have not kept pace.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mediterranean diet and heart health

Researchers have found a mechanism through which a diet that combines unsaturated fats with vegetables abundant in nitrite and nitrate, such as olive oil and leafy greens, may protect mice from hypertension. Philip Eaton and colleagues investigated the process by which nitro fatty acids, which are generated from the reaction of unsaturated fatty acids with nitrogen species, lower blood pressure.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bottom trawling may lead to deep-sea desertification

A study finds that chronic bottom trawling removes organic carbon from sea floors and threatens deep-sea biodiversity. Bottom trawling involves a fishing vessel pulling an open net that remains in contact with the sea floor. Bottom trawling is carried out deeper in the ocean now than at the beginning of the 19th century, due to declining near-shore fish populations.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function

The blood-brain barrier prevents xenobiotics from entering the central nervous system. Growing evidence indicates that neurotoxins, such as tributyltin, manganese and nanoparticles, may disrupt the function of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barriers.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 16-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Effect of repeated-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation at the Guangming point on EEGs

In a recent study reported in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 9, No. 5, 2014), repeated-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was administered to healthy people at the left Guangming (GB37) and a mock point, and calculated the sample entropy of electroencephalogram signals using nonlinear dynamics.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 16-May-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Neuronal activation by acupuncture at Yongquan and sham acupoints for DOC: a PET study

Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medicine technique that is often used to help improve the level of consciousness in patients with disorder of consciousness (DOC). However, the responses to stimulation of acupoints in patients with DOC are not fully understood.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 16-May-2014
Science
New NMR approach reveals details of tissues

How do researchers know if a tissue they grow in the lab -- like bone, for example -- is similar enough to a biological tissue to act as an accurate model? Until now, there hasn’t been a way to compare the atomic-level structures of complex materials, like extracellular matrix, in such in-vitro models to the real thing.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-May-2014
Science
Environmental cues impact sperm function

Sperm require trail guides to make the long, arduous journey to the female egg, and a new study suggests that pheromones in the air sniffed by the female nose ensure these trail guides come around. Female animals have a powerful sense of smell, able to detect an array of molecules including intra-species signaling molecules called pheromones.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-May-2014
Science
Stick bugs reveal predictable processes of evolution

By transplanting stick insects from their preferred plant hosts to alternative hosts and watching what happens to their genomes, researchers have determined that certain aspects of evolution can be both predictable and repeatable.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-May-2014
Science
A skeleton clue to early American ancestry

Buried alongside saber-toothed cats, pumas and bobcats, a near-complete human skeleton in a watery cave in Mexico is helping scientists answer the question, "Who were the first Americans?" Deciphering the ancestry of the first people to populate the Americas has been a challenge.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Small molecule drug prevents lethal radiation sickness

Large-scale radiation exposure, of the type that occurred after the Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disasters, continues to be a global public health concern and military threat. Researchers working in mice have shown that a new class of drugs being developed to treat other conditions might help save lives in the event of a radiation accident.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-May-2014
The largest electrical networks are not the best

There is an optimum size for electrical networks if what is being considered is the risk of a blackout. This is the conclusion reached by a scientific study done by researchers at Universidad Carlos III in Madrid (UC3M); the study analyzes the dynamics of these complex infrastructures.

Contact: jav ier alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 14-May-2014
The president of the Portuguese Republic visits SIMM

Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SIMM) signed today (May 14th) a Memorandum of Understanding with University of Minho (UMinho), a Portuguese public university, and a collaboration agreement with TECHNOPHAGE, a biotechnology company headquartered in Lisbon, Portugal. The unique partnerships were announced at SIMM during the state visit of His Excellency the President of the Republic of Portugal to China.

Contact: Yanlin Lin
yllin@simm.ac.cn
86-215-080-5901
Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-May-2014
JAMA
Monoclonal antibody combined with statin results in further reduction of cholesterol levels

Among patients with high cholesterol receiving moderate- or high-intensity statin therapy, the addition of the human monoclonal antibody evolocumab resulted in additional lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, according to a study in the May 14 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Jennifer G. Robinson, M.D., M.P.H.
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 14-May-2014
JAMA
Study examines effectiveness of medications to treat alcohol use disorders

An analysis of more than 120 studies that examined the effectiveness of medications to treat alcohol use disorders reports that acamprosate and oral naltrexone show the strongest evidence for decreasing alcohol consumption, according to a study in the May 14 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Daniel E. Jonas, M.D., M.P.H.
thania_benios@unc.edu
919-962-8596
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Autophagic activation with nimotuzumab enhances chemo-radiosensitivity

Nimotuzumab, a humanized IgG1 isotype monoclonal antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), enhanced the sensitivity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells with high expression of EGFR to chemo-radiotherapy, due to autophagic activation mediated by this agent. It was concluded that autophagic activation mediated by nimotuzumab could promote autophagic cell death and produce additive antitumor effects.

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province

Contact: Longbang Chen
dr.chenlb@163.com
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Fossils of beetles that feed on palm trees can be used to establish the presence of frost-intolerant palms in Washington State and British Columbia during the Eocene, suggesting warm winters and low temperature seasonality in the temperate uplands of British Columbia and Washington during that epoch, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 251-275 out of 643 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]