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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 562 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 28-May-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Synthetic bacteria noninvasively detect diabetes, cancer in urine

Researchers have designed bacteria that noninvasively detect diabetes and cancer, respectively, in urine. The studies, conducted by two separate groups, lay the groundwork for using synthetic bacteria as diagnostic tools in the clinic.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Chinese Optics Letters
Novel optical scheme based on cryogenic radiometer for successive calibration

Researchers led by Prof. Xiaobin Zheng, from Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences designed and made use of a novel calibration optical path with the standard transfer detector which was placed inside the vacuum unit. This scheme theoretically eliminated the uncertainty caused by the window transmittance. It is reported in Chinese Optics Letters Vol.13, No.5, 2015.

Contact: Xiaofeng Wang
wxf@siom.ac.cn
0216-991-8198
Chinese Laser Press

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Developmental Cell
Tiny heart, big promise

The heart has its own dedicated blood supply, with coronary arteries that supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart and cardiac veins that remove deoxygenated blood. This system of vessels nourishes the heart, enabling it to pump blood to all the other organs and tissues of the body. Yet despite their critical importance, the process and molecules required for coronary vessel development have not been fully determined.

Contact: Ellin Kavanagh
ekavanagh@chla.usc.edu
323-361-8505
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sleepers among scientific articles

Scientific papers that lie dormant for years after publication and then see a spike in interest, measured by an increase in citations by other papers, may be more common than thought, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Competition between harmless and drug-resistant bacteria

Researchers report that pheromones produced by a bacterium that is native to the gut can kill multidrug-resistant strains of the same bacterium. Multidrug-resistant Enterococcus bacteria are leading causes of hospital-acquired infection, colonizing the gut after antibiotics disrupt native bacteria.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

To find ovarian tumor-specific molecules that could be used as diagnostic and therapeutic targets, custom bioinformatics algorithms were developed and used to analyze gene expression data from 296 ovarian cancer tissues and 1,839 normal tissues, revealing 17 candidate RNA molecules produced by most of the cancer tissues but by few of the normal tissues, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Oxidation chemistry of biogenic emissions

The structure of biogenic compounds emitted into the atmosphere can affect how the compounds are oxidized, according to a study. Aerosol particles, a major source of cloud condensation nuclei, can form from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-May-2015
JAMA
Soy isoflavone supplement does not improve symptoms, lung function for patients with poorly controlled asthma

Although some data have suggested that supplementation with soy isoflavone may be an effective treatment for patients with poor asthma control, a randomized trial that included nearly 400 children and adults found that use of the supplement did not result in improved lung function or clinical outcomes, including asthma symptoms and episodes of poor asthma control, according to a study in the May 26 issue of JAMA. Soy isoflavones are plant (soybean) derived chemicals that have anti-oxidant effects.

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 26-May-2015
JAMA
Subclinical hyperthyroidism associated with an increased risk of hip and other fractures

In an analysis that included more than 70,000 participants from 13 studies, subclinical hyperthyroidism was associated with an increased risk for hip and other fractures including spine, according to a study in the May 26 issue of JAMA. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is a low serum thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration in a person without clinical symptoms and normal thyroid hormone concentrations on blood tests.

Contact: Nicolas Rodondi, M.D., M.A.S.
Nicolas.Rodondi@insel.ch
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 23-May-2015
Journal of Applied Physics
Tunable liquid metal antennas

Using electrochemistry, North Carolina State University researchers have created a reconfigurable, voltage-controlled liquid metal antenna that may play a huge role in future mobile devices and the coming Internet of Things

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science
Inland ice in Antarctica melting fast

Many glaciers on the Southern Antarctic Peninsula (SAP) became destabilized in 2009 and have melted at accelerating rates since then, researchers say. These glaciers, which rest on bedrock that dips below sea level toward the continent’s interior, help to buttress inland ice shelves -- but their structures are thought to be unstable.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science
Similarities seen between cancerous and sun-Exposed cells

Normal human skin cells harbor a surprisingly large number of acquired mutations, including many known cancer-promoters that are under strong positive selection, researchers say. These new findings reveal that so-called driver mutations, which are known to accumulate in certain skin cancer cells, also occur frequently in normal, sun-exposed skin cells.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science
Paraplegic patient reveals neurons behind planning

Microelectrodes implanted in the brain of a paraplegic patient are telling researchers more about the neuronal activity underlying our physical movements. These new findings represent an important step toward improved neuro-prosthetic devices, highlighting the crucial role of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in both actual and imagined movements.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science
Tara Oceans Expedition yields treasure trove of plankton data

In five related reports in this issue of the journal Science, a multinational team of researchers who spent three and a half years sampling the ocean’s sunlit upper layers aboard the schooner Tara unveil the first results of the Tara Oceans project. Planktonic life in the ocean is far more diverse than scientists knew, these reports show.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-May-2015
China Century signs agreement with University of Chicago Medicine

China Century Group and the University of Chicago Medicine signed an exclusive agreement Thursday to improve health care delivery in China by bringing international standards and best practices to hospitals across the country.

Contact: Emilio Williams
Emilio.Williams@uchospitals.edu
773-702-4617
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 21-May-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Overlooked protein drives tissue fibrosis

A new study uncovers an overlooked protein’s role in driving fibrosis, or excessive scarring of tissue. Blocking this protein, known as αvβ1 integrin, reduced fibrotic tissue in mice, offering a new strategy for treating this disease.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-May-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Secrets of an ancient Chinese remedy for malaria finally uncovered

An ancient Chinese herbal medicine for malaria, known scientifically as febrifugine, works by disrupting the parasites’ protein-building machinery, a new study shows. A compound based on febrifugine designed by the researchers proved effective and much safer than the traditional herbal medicine for treating malaria infection in mice, offering a starting point for a new class of drugs for this mosquito-borne disease.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Harvesting Energy from Electromagnetic Waves

This week in the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing, researchers from the University of Waterloo in Canada report a novel design for electromagnetic energy harvesting based on the "full absorption concept." This involves the use of metamaterials that can be tailored to produce media that neither reflects nor transmits any power -- enabling full absorption of incident waves at a specific range of frequencies and polarizations.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Photonic Crystal Nanolaser Biosensor Simplifies DNA Detection

As the team of Yokohama National University researchers in Japan reports in Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing, they created a photonic crystal nanolaser biosensor capable of detecting the adsorption of biomolecules based on the laser’s wavelength shift.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Journal of Chemical Physics
Where the Rubber Meets the Road

Researchers combine simple experiments first employed by Leonardo da Vinci with advanced theory to reveal new atomic-level insights into what happens when rubber slides across asphalt.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that mice expressing a defective form of an enzyme that cleaves chitin, a major component of dust mite exoskeletons, exhibited increased inflammatory responses to inhaled dust mites because cleaved chitin can trigger deactivation of the inflammatory response, suggesting possible treatment strategies for airway inflammation caused by dust mites.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mobility, agriculture, and bone strength

Changes to human bone strength during the Holocene Epoch may be due to dramatic changes in mobility following the initiation of agriculture, according to a study. Declining bone strength relative to body size in humans since the Pleistocene Epoch has been attributed to increasing sedentism, with associated changes in social structure and health.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Disease forecasting through machine learning

Researchers report a method for predicting new sources of rodent-borne diseases. As animal-borne disease outbreaks increase in frequency, anticipating future outbreaks becomes a public health priority.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gene expression profiles of single brain cells

Researchers report a method for classifying individual cells in the human brain based on gene expression profiles. The human brain contains an enormous variety of cell types that differ in gene expression patterns. Previous approaches to classifying the cell types have been limited to using only a few gene or protein markers and analyzing whole populations of cells.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gene editing, phage therapy, and antibiotic resistance

A proof-of-concept study suggests that phage therapy might offer an approach to address the long-intractable problem of antibiotic resistance. Phage therapy, predicated on tailored viruses that target pathogenic bacteria, could help counter the surge of antibiotic resistance, but the strategy suffers from shortfalls, not least of which are the difficulty of delivering phages into infected tissues and the frequent transfer of phage-resistance genes between bacteria.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 251-275 out of 562 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]