EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
27-Nov-2014 14:29
Beijing Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Breaking News

Multimedia Gallery

Subscribe/Sponsor

Interviews

Events Calendar

Selected Science Sources in China

MOST

CAS

CAE

CAST

NSFC

CASS

CAAS

CAMS

RSS

EurekAlert!

Text Size Option

Language

English (英文)

Chinese (中文)

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 723 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Science
Opposing chemicals balance the mood

Dueling chemicals -- one that excites neurons and one that inhibits them -- together put the damper on a negative mood in a brain region linked to depression, a new study shows. Recent research has suggested that hyperactive neurons projecting onto a brain region called the lateral habenula, or LHb, contribute to depression.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Science
Global population won’t stabilize this century

A new report suggests that contrary to past projections arguing that global population will peak around 2050, the world’s population is unlikely to stabilize this century. The results, based on a statistical analysis of the most recent population projections from the United Nations (UN), point to Sub-Saharan Africa as the primary engine driving this unexpected growth through 2100.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Mental practice in stroke patients: how to improve affected limb function?

Mental practice in stroke patients: how to improve affected limb function?

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Growth factor- and cytokine-stimulated EPCs in post-ischemic cerebral neovascularization

Growth factor- and cytokine-stimulated EPCs in post-ischemic cerebral neovascularization

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
The understanding on the neural connectivity of the fornix in the human brain

The understanding on the neural connectivity of the fornix in the human brain

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Gene-swapping plasmids aid antibiotic resistance in hospitals

Bacteria appear to be swapping antibiotic-resistance genes through mobile pieces of circular DNA called plasmids, and this exchange may be contributing to the alarming rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals. Resistance has created a quandary for hospitals, particularly in intensive care units where patients often have weakened immune systems.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
PLoS ONE
Doing science just got cheaper -- and faster

Furnishing a research lab can be pretty expensive. Now a team led by an engineer at Michigan Technological University has published an open-source library of designs that will let scientists slash the cost of one commonly used piece of equipment: the syringe pump.

Syringe pumps are used to dispatch precise amounts of liquid, as for drug delivery or mixing chemicals in a reaction. They can also cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars.

Contact: Marcia Goodrich
mlgoodri@mtu.edu
906-487-2343
Michigan Technological University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
JAMA
Combination therapy for COPD associated with better outcomes

Among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly those with asthma, newly prescribed long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs) and inhaled corticosteroid combination therapy, compared with newly prescribed LABAs alone, was associated with a lower risk of death or COPD hospitalization, according to a study in the September 17 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Laura Bristow
laura.bristow@sunnybrook.ca
416-480-4040
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
JAMA
Magnesium sulfate supplementation during pregnancy does not show long-term benefit on various outcomes for very preterm infants

Magnesium sulfate (a compound also known as Epsom salt) given to pregnant women at risk of very preterm birth was not associated with benefit on neurological, behavioral, growth, or functional outcomes in their children at school age, according to a study in the September 17 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Lex W. Doyle, M.D., M.Sc.
lwd@unimelb.edu.au
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
The role of DJ-1 in the oxidative stress cell death cascade after stroke

The role of DJ-1 in the oxidative stress cell death cascade after stroke.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Give progesterone a chance

Give progesterone a chance.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Molecular mechanisms of the suppression of axon regeneration by KLF transcription factors

Molecular mechanisms of the suppression of axon regeneration by KLF transcription factors.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Chemical Physics
The future face of molecular electronics

Researchers from six Japanese and Taiwanese universities has identified a potential candidate for use in small-scale electronics: a molecule called picene. They characterize the structural and electronic properties of a thin layer of picene on a silver surface, demonstrating the molecule’s potential for electronic applications

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A form of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase that facilitates glutamate turnover in the brain and is specific to hominids diminishes the growth-inhibitory effect of IDH1R132H enzymes and may lead to glioma brain tumors, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Altruists are attuned to others’ distress

Altruists are highly sensitive to others’ distress and show elevated activity in a brain region that responds to emotion, a study finds. The propensity to engage in altruism varies widely across individuals and may be genetically mediated, but little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tunable, aluminum nanorods for full-color displays

Abundant, inexpensive aluminum may be used to produce vivid colors in pixels comprising color display technologies such as liquid crystal displays, according to a study. Visual display technologies that employ inorganic materials to produce color have the potential to improve the durability and extend the lifespan of color displays, but inorganic materials are limited in their ability to produce vivid blue colors.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Pulque production in ancient Mexico

Residue recovered from pottery vessels suggests that the residents of Teotihuacan, Mexico, one of the largest urban centers of prehistory, made an alcoholic beverage from agave, according to a study. In addition to celebratory and social uses, alcoholic beverages likely provided ancient peoples with an important source of essential nutrients, potable water, and insurance against failed crops.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cretaceous climate change and the rise of angiosperms

The changes in global climate associated with the breakup of the supercontinent Pangea may have provided the temperate humid conditions for angiosperms to flourish during the Cretaceous period, according to a study. Angiosperms diversified rapidly during the Cretaceous, reshaping a world previously dominated by ferns and conifers.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mating response in male beetles

Artificial female beetles, engineered to display nanoscale features of the insects’ exoskeleton, trigger mating behaviors in male beetles, according to a study. Recent advances in material fabrication techniques have led to a surge in biologically inspired designs across a range of practical applications.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tracing groundwater contamination above shale gas fields

A study of noble gas isotopes in groundwater above the Marcellus and Barnett Shale formations finds that fugitive shale gas leaking into groundwater originates from faulty well casing and cement construction rather than from horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing deep underground.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate change and selection of temperature-dependent traits

A study suggests that an abrupt shift in environmental temperature may stimulate natural selection for traits that promote the survival of species sensitive to anthropogenic climate change. Tropical ectotherms such as reptiles and amphibians are particularly threatened by climate change because of their narrow tolerance for environmental temperature changes.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
High-level brain regions support shared conscious experiences

A common neural code might underlie conscious experiences shared by different individuals, according to a study. Evaluating human consciousness based on brain activity is a major challenge of modern neuroscience. Lorina Naci and colleagues used fMRI to examine neural activity in 12 healthy participants as well as two behaviorally unresponsive, brain-injured individuals with unknown levels of consciousness while the subjects viewed a highly engaging movie by Alfred Hitchcock.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Language-associated gene accelerates learning in mice

The transcription factor Foxp2 has been linked to the development of human speech and language, and a study finds that introducing a “humanized” version of this gene into mice accelerates learning.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
China and UC Davis partner to put zero emission vehicles on a faster track

In a landmark international collaboration on clean vehicle adoption, the University of California, Davis, and the China Automotive Technology and Research Center will work together to help speed the commercialization of plug-in and fuel cell electric cars in China and the U.S. under an agreement signed Sept. 6 in Tianjin, China.

Contact: Katherine Kerlin
kekerlin@ucdavis.edu
530-752-7704
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
Global health special issue

For this special issue, the editors of Science have invited experts to weigh in on some of the greatest challenges to the global health landscape, and the technologies and strategies influencing positive change. An Editorial, an Opinion, and 11 Perspectives compliment a special package of news.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 251-275 out of 723 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]