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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 616 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 6-Feb-2014
BioScience
Policymakers and scientists agree on top research questions

A survey of natural resource managers, policymakers and their advisers, and scientists has found that these groups have surprisingly similar ideas about which research questions are most important for increasing the effectiveness of US natural resource management policies. The question seen as most important was about the quantity and quality of surface and groundwater needed to sustain the US human population and ecosystem resilience.


This work was supported in part by Kresge Foundation grant no. 239855 to the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Contact: Timothy M. Beardsley
tbeardsley@aibs.org
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 6-Feb-2014
Science Translational Medicine
A 'feeling' prosthetic hand

Scientists have created a prosthetic hand that helped an amputee who had not experienced the sensation of touch for ten years to feel differences in the shape and stiffness of objects again; for example, differences in shape and stiffness between a mandarin orange and a baseball.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
JAMA
Pre-term infants with severe retinopathy more likely to have non-visual disabilities at age 5

In a group of very low-birth-weight infants, severe retinopathy of prematurity was associated with nonvisual disabilities at age 5 years, according to a study in the February 5 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Alison Fraser
FraserA1@email.chop.edu
267-426-6054
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
JAMA
Pattern of higher blood pressure in early adulthood helps predict risk of atherosclerosis in middle-age

In an analysis of blood pressure patterns over a 25-year span from young adulthood to middle age, individuals who exhibited elevated and increasing blood pressure levels throughout this time period had greater odds of having higher measures of coronary artery calcification (a measure of coronary artery atherosclerosis), according to a study in the February 5 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Norrina B. Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H.
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Using fMRI data from 108 healthy individuals performing a naturalistic risk-taking task, researchers successfully predicted whether individuals would choose risky or safe options on subsequent trials.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Modeling impacts of climate change on malaria risk

A study comparing modeled future global malaria impacts finds that tropical highland regions of Africa, Asia, and South America may experience heightened climate-change-related malaria risk. The extent of malaria transmission depends on some climatic factors, which influence both the distribution of malaria-carrying mosquitoes and the length of the season in which the mosquitoes are active.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Potential long-term benefits of breast milk antibodies

Failure to receive a type of breast milk-derived antibody might be linked to reduced protection against intestinal inflammation in adulthood, according to a preliminary study in mice. Researchers have previously found that a class of breast milk-derived antibodies called secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) can influence the composition of gut microbes in suckling infants, conferring immune protection early in life.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bone-like synthetic material with high strength-to-weight ratio

By mimicking the properties that make bones both strong and light, researchers have engineered a class of synthetic materials with high strength-to-weight ratios, according to a study. Although the quest to create low-density, high-strength synthetic materials has helped optimize classical materials like aluminum alloys and composites, the lightest solid materials have densities in the range of 1,000 kilograms per cubic meter, similar to liquid water.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gypsies' genes reveal traces of convergent evolution

Researchers have identified immune system genes in Europeans and Gypsies that likely underwent convergent evolution during Europe's deadly epidemics. Immune system genes evolve under the influence of infectious diseases, but few studies have attempted genome-wide assessments of infection-driven evolution.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Modeling air pollutant emissions from Athabasca oil sands

Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the Athabasca oil sands region in Canada may be larger than initially estimated, a study finds. The process of mining and processing bitumen-rich oil sands may release PAH pollutants into air, soil, and water. Environmental impact assessments attempt to estimate pollutant emissions, but may not account for every possible pathway.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ion channel and acetaminophen-induced liver damage

Researchers seeking to prevent the lethal consequences of acetaminophen overdose may have found a clue to treating certain types of liver disease, a study finds. Although overdose with acetaminophen, an over-the-counter pain medication, often leads to liver failure, early treatment options are limited because the mechanisms of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity remain unclear.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Can a protein controlling blood pressure enhance immune responses and prevent Alzheimer's?

Many people with high blood pressure are familiar with ACE inhibitors, drugs that widen blood vessels by limiting activity of ACE – angiotensin-converting enzyme – a naturally occurring protein found in tissues throughout the body.


Contact: Sandy Van
sandy@prpacific.com
808-526-1708
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
Bulletin of the World Health Organization
Tighter economic regulation needed to reverse obesity epidemic - study

Using a novel method, this study presents new findings on the association between the rise in obesity and the increase in fast-food consumption over a 10-year period in affluent countries. It shows how important public policies are for addressing the epidemic of obesity.


RDV is supported by a grant from the Economic and Social Research Council (RES-070-27-0034). No funding bodies had any role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Contact: Karen Finney
karen.finney@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9064
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 31-Jan-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Price highlighting helps consumers stick to longer-term product preferences

Just when that new gym membership is looking like a mistake, recent marketing research shows that reminding consumers of the price strengthens their purchase choices and leads to long-term satisfaction.


Contact: Ken McGuffin
mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca
416-946-3818
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 31-Jan-2014
Science
No two savannas evolve the same way

Although they look the same, the savannas of Africa, Australia and South America have established unique relationships with the local climate and fire patterns -- and none of them can be expected to respond to climate change in the same way, according to a new study.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Jan-2014
Science
Chemical tricks in new hosts expand pathogen potpourri

A pathogen that has spent generations colonizing one host can make the leap to and successfully inhabit an entirely different one, and now a new report suggests biochemical changes pathogens initiate in their new hosts allow them to make this jump.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Jan-2014
Science
A map of disease-causing mutations?

Researchers have used a combination of genetics and functional analysis to create a map of mutations that contribute to hereditary spastic paraplegias, or HSPs -- inherited neurodegenerative disorders that cause stiffness and contraction in the lower limbs.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Jan-2014
Science
The ties that bind Neandertals and modern humans

Even though Neandertals went extinct a very long time ago, there’s still a little bit of their DNA in most all of us, a new study shows. And while the total amount of Neandertal sequence in any modern human is relatively low, the cumulative amount of the Neandertal genome that persists across all humans is 20 percent, this same report says.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Screening for transformed human mesenchymal stromal cells with tumorigenic potential

Spontaneous transformation of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) has been observed during long-term expansion in cell culture, although it is rare. Engrafting these transformed cells into immunodeficient mice leads to the formation of solid tumors. Using high-throughput profiling methods, a panel of RNA molecules was identified as potential biomarkers for screening for these transformed cells in cell culture.


Fndn for Liver & Gastrointestinal Res (SLO) Rotterdam; Netherlands Org for Scientific Res (NWO)

Contact: Dr. Qiuwei Pan
q.pan@erasmusmc.nl
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Antioxidants may raise cancer risk in certain high-risk patients

A new study helps explain why taking antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations, like smokers. Antioxidants are chemical compounds that delay some types of cell damage.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study reports that the blockade of signaling by OX40L and its receptor OX40—immune cell modulators that are primarily expressed in the inflamed joints of arthritic mice and humans with rheumatoid arthritis—reduced signs of joint inflammation and restored bone and cartilage integrity in arthritic mice, suggesting that OX40 and OX40L may be potential therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cooperation and wealth inequality among nations

Wealth inequality among nations can enhance cooperation on issues such as global climate change, a study finds. To date, global climate summits have faced conflicts over mitigation strategies between rich and poor countries. Addressing the issue from a theoretical perspective, Simon Levin and colleagues incorporated analogous real-world wealth inequality into a mathematical model called the public goods dilemma, a standard economics game in which participants must cooperate to enact collective action or risk overall collapse.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Role of seminal fluid in offspring metabolic health

Lack of seminal fluid during conception is tied to adverse metabolic effects in male offspring of mice, according to a study. Seminal fluid, produced by seminal vesicle glands, promotes sperm survival and function in the female reproductive tract, alters the female immune response to accommodate sperm and the zygote, and influences fetal metabolic processes.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Broad-spectrum influenza vaccine shows promise in mice and ferrets

Mice and ferrets inoculated with a broad-spectrum vaccine showed a greater immune response and greater protection to three strains of the H1N1 flu virus than from a traditional vaccine, according to a study. Every year, influenza vaccines are reformulated to protect against the new season’s flu strains.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles

A nanocomputer comprising interconnected nanowire tiles can perform integrated sequential and arithmetic computing tasks, according to a study. Physical limitations may impede further miniaturization of microelectronics using current silicon transistor designs. To develop a nanocomputer architecture that circumvents those physical limitations, Charles Lieber and colleagues synthesized nanowires with diameters less than 20 nanometers, and implemented an assembly technique to organize the nanowires into six highly-ordered nanowire crossbar arrays.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 251-275 out of 616 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]