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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 524 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]

Public Release: 13-Nov-2015
Science
Baffin Island provides insights into origin of Earth’s water

Analysis of lava from deep within Earth’s mantle suggests that the source of our planet’s water was water-soaked dust grains present early in the solar system as the planets were just beginning to form.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Nov-2015
Science
Shrinking shelf and faster flow for Greenland glacier

A major glacier in northeast Greenland known as Zachariæ Isstrøm began a rapid retreat in recent years, a new study reports.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Optical manipulation in optofluidic microbubble resonators

As the high-Q whispering gallery modes (WGMs) are excited in an optofluidic microbubble resonators (MBR), the buildup of field intensity inside the resonator is large enough to trap nanoscale particles. A study calculates the optical gradient forces exerting on the particles when the WGMs with different radial orders are excited. Since most of the optical fields reside within the water core, the WGMs with high radial orders show a better trapping stability under Brownian motion.

Open Project of State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, China

Contact: WU Xiang
wuxiang@fudan.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
Nano Research
Direct detection and measurement of wall shear stress using a filamentous bio-nanoparticle

In this work, we report a nanosensor that can directly measure wall shear stress (WSS) in microfluidic chambers with sub-micron spatial resolution by using a specific type of virus, the bacteriophage M13, which has been fluorescently labeled and anchored to a surface. It is demonstrated that the nanosensor can be calibrated and adapted for biological tissue, revealing WSS in micro-domains of cells that cannot be calculated accurately from bulk flow measurements.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
Nano Research
Hole-doping of mechanically exfoliated graphene by confined hydration layers

In this work we measure the local surface potential of mechanically exfoliated graphene on the prototypical insulating hydrophilic substrate of CaF2(111). Hydration layers confined between the graphene and the CaF2 substrate, resulting from the graphene’s preparation, are found to hole-dope the graphene due to the first 2 to 3 water layers adjacent to the it.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Biomarkers may help detect multiple sclerosis and allergy earlier

A new study identifies three proteins that regulate the early stages of multiple sclerosis and hay fever, offering potentially valuable biomarkers for detecting and preventing these immune disorders before patients show signs of disease.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
A network of artificial neurons learns to use human language

A group of researchers from the University of Sassari (Italy) and the University of Plymouth (UK) has developed a cognitive model, made up of two million interconnected artificial neurons, able to learn to communicate using human language starting from a state of 'tabula rasa', only through communication with a human interlocutor.

Contact: Dr. Bruno Golosio
golosio@uniss.it
39-320-422-0312
Università di Sassari

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Loyola neurosurgeon Christopher Loftus, M.D., named Honorary Citizen of Changzhou, China

Neurosurgeon Christopher Loftus, MD, of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine has been named an Honorary Citizen of the city of Changzhou, China. The honor is in recognition of a medical education program Dr. Loftus helped to establish between Loyola's medical school and the First People's Hospital of Changzhou.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
Design public key cryptosystem to post-quantum computation

Quantum algorithms have serious threat for public key cryptography. A study proves that there is no polynomial sizes quantum circuits for computing all Boolean functions. Public key cryptography is designed based on data complexity and NPC problem, which can be used in the nesting of the classical cryptosystems, and it is conducive to system upgrade.

State Key Program of National Natural Science of China (No. 61332019)

Contact: WU WanQing
wuwanqing8888@163.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Nano Research
Nanostructure and mechanical properties of the osteocyte LCN-associated bone matrix

In this work, we show the feasibility to apply quantitativenanomechanical mapping to characterize hard heterogeneousbiomaterials on nanoscale.It has been demonstrated that LCN associated bone matrix has spatiallyinhomogeneousmechanical properties,and it is less stiff than matrixfurther away from the LCN network.We conclude that osteocytes can demineralize the perilacunar matrix. LCN is likely to model bone nano/micro-mechanics in a more direct way than to understood.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Based on a series of experiments with 264 individuals who played the roles of producers and consumers in an asset market scenario, researchers report that when sellers are able to produce new asset units, prices remain at or below the assets' intrinsic values, whereas in previous asset market experiments without reproducible assets, prices have typically followed a bubble-and-crash pattern.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Dengue transmission by asymptomatic individuals

Researchers report that asymptomatic people could transmit dengue virus to mosquitoes. By some estimates, in three-quarters of the total dengue infections per year, the virus is detectable in blood, but no clinical symptoms are evident.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tracking influenza outbreaks

Researchers report a method that substantially improves previous efforts for tracking influenza outbreaks using online search data. The ability to prepare for and respond to influenza outbreaks depends on accurate real-time estimates of disease activity.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Past abrupt climate warming and desert wetlands

Abrupt climate change can trigger drought and lead to the collapse of fragile ecosystems that rely on stable water sources within arid environments, a study suggests.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Noninvasive prenatal genetic testing

Researchers report the detection of fetal DNA duplications and deletions in maternal plasma DNA. Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) uses sequencing of fetal DNA in maternal blood plasma to screen for abnormal numbers of fetal chromosomes.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Chemical dispersants and oil degradation

Researchers report that chemical dispersants can inhibit oil degradation by microbes following spills. In response to marine oil spills, such as the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, chemical dispersants are routinely applied to break up large oil slicks and facilitate oil degradation by microorganisms.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Nov-2015
JAMA
Study examines prevalence of ‘silent’ heart attacks in population

In a multiethnic, middle-aged and older study population, the prevalence of myocardial scars (evidence of a heart attack) was nearly 8 percent, of which nearly 80 percent were unrecognized by electrocardiography or clinical evaluation, according to a study in the Nov. 10 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Molly Freimuth
molly.freimuth@nih.gov
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 9-Nov-2015
JAMA
Shared financial incentives for physicians and patients result in improved ldl cholesterol levels

In a study examining the effect of financial incentives to improve lipid levels among patients in primary care practices, shared financial incentives for physicians and patients, but not incentives to physicians or patients alone, resulted in a modest reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels after 12 months, according to a study in the Nov. 10 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Katie Delach
Katharine.Delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5964
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 8-Nov-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
Obtaining high-quality labels by crowdsourcing

Crowdsourcing makes it possible to hire voluntary workers in the internet to label large-scale data by offering them small monetary payments. Now researchers in Nanjing University have provided theoretical support for obtaining high-quality labels by crowdsourcing.

The National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61305067, 61333014) and the Collaborative Innovation Center of Novel Software Technology and Industrialization.

Contact: ZHOU Zhi-Hua
zhouzh@nju.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 7-Nov-2015
NTU sets up Sino-Singapore International Joint Research Institute

Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) is setting up a joint research institute in Guangzhou, China that aims to develop new technologies ranging from electric vehicles and sustainable urban development to nutrition and food science.

The Sino-Singapore International Joint Research Institute is set up in partnership with the Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City (SSGKC) Administrative Committee, the SSGKC Investment and Development Co., Ltd. and South China University of Technology (SCUT).

Contact: Ang Hui Min
huimin@ntu.edu.sg
Nanyang Technological University

Public Release: 6-Nov-2015
Science
Compound 'dissolves' protein clumps that cause cataracts

Identification of a compound that reduces the “cloudiness” associated with cataracts could lead to a new therapeutic for this common age-related eye disorder.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Nov-2015
Science
Vitamin C stresses and kills mutant cancer cells

Colorectal cancer cells with certain mutations “handle” vitamin C differently than other cancer cells, and this difference ultimately kills them, a new study shows.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Nov-2015
Science
Gut microbiome drives success of immunotherapy

It is not well understood why some patients respond well to immunotherapy while others do not, but two new studies provide evidence that the gut microbiome can play a role.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Nov-2015
Science
Special issue: Results from MAVEN

This special issue of Science features four exciting papers highlighting results of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission to Mars, designed to study the upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Nov-2015
Science Translational Medicine
'Liquid biopsy' predicts resistance in prostate cancer patients

Using an approach known as 'liquid biopsy,' which scans blood for traces of tumor DNA, researchers have uncovered genetic mutations that may be driving drug resistance in a subset of prostate cancer patients.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 251-275 out of 524 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]