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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 732 releases.
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Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study finds that treatment with the broccoli-sprout extract sulforaphane improved performance on assessments for social responsiveness and verbal communication, among other indicators, of 29 men ages 13-27 with autism spectrum disorder, and that scores returned to pre-treatment levels following discontinuation of treatment.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Deforestation responsibility and Amazon landowners

Policies aimed at decreasing Amazon deforestation with command-and-control enforcement measures may have reached the limits of their effectiveness, and rainforest conservation may require an incentive-based approach that accounts for the different roles of landowners in deforestation, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Income distribution and the brain’s reward system

Attitudes related to income distribution may have a basis in the brain’s reward system, a study suggests. People strongly prefer fair outcomes, such as payment that is proportional to effort. However, despite potential implications for social and political institutions, how the brain responds to income distributions in situations where people have made varying contributions of effort remains unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Influence of antiretroviral therapies on HIV incidence

The effectiveness of antiretroviral therapies (ART) in reducing HIV incidence is not necessarily hampered in instances where a large proportion of HIV transmission events occur during the first few months after infection when individuals are highly infectious, according to a study. ART can reduce HIV transmission by reducing the number of viral particles in the bloodstream of infected individuals.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mitochondrial DNA mutations and maternal age

A study explores the mother-to-child transmission of genetic variants linked with diseases such as cancer and diabetes. The cell’s metabolic powerhouse, the mitochondrion, harbors its own maternally inherited genome that can sometimes contain multiple mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) types in one individual, a phenomenon known as heteroplasmy.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reconstructing pesticide use from lake sediments

By analyzing sediment cores, researchers have partially reconstructed the dynamics of pesticide mobility from vineyard soil into a downstream lake in eastern France, suggesting that soil erosion tied to the use of pesticides and to other viticultural practices may have carried residues of long-banned insecticides into the lake.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Oct-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
The specific receptor targeted by naltrexone to enhance diabetic wound closure is OGFr

Naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, blocks OGFr that functions as part of a regulatory pathway related to cell replication. Topical naltrexone stimulates cell replication in full thickness cutaneous wounds in a receptor mediated manner. Using primary rat fibroblast cell cultures, the specific and selective receptor pathway blocked by naltrexone was determined to be OGFr, not classical opioid receptors. Animal studies confirmed that only naltrexone, and not other opioid receptor antagonists, enhanced full thickness cutaneous wounds.

Am Diabetes Assoc, The Shockey Family Foundation

Contact: Dr. Patricia J. McLaughlin
pxm9@psu.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 11-Oct-2014
Nano Research
Drug-infused nanoparticle is right for sore eyes

For the millions of sufferers of dry eye syndrome, their only recourse to easing the painful condition is to use drug-laced eye drops three times a day. Now, researchers from the University of Waterloo have developed a topical solution containing nanoparticles that will combat dry eye syndrome with only one application a week.

Contact: Pamela Smyth
psmyth@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4777
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 11-Oct-2014
American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition
Survey: Moms who choose to breastfeed older babies motivated by health, nutrition benefits

Mothers who decide to breastfeed their children beyond 1 year of age consider their child's physical and social development to be most important, while the advice of health care professionals, family and friends are least important, according to a study to be presented Monday, Oct. 13 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition in San Diego.

Contact: Deborah Jacobson
djacobson@aap.org
847-434-7084
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
IOF Regionals 5th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting
Osteoporosis International
Osteoporosis education and research focus of upcoming meeting in Taipei City

The 5th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting to be held at the Taipei International Convention Centre from November 14-16, 2014 offers CME credits from various local medical associations. The meeting programme features a broad range of clinical topics and regional research will be highlighted. Online registration at lower rates is possible until November 13, 2014

Contact: Sherman Lee
iofap@iofbonehealth.org
656-496-5508
International Osteoporosis Foundation

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
Science
Star-forming galaxy a window into the distant past?

Researchers have identified a starburst galaxy, or one that is churning out stars at an exceptionally high rate, that has many of the traits that would have been necessary to provide the first bit of starlight to the dark, early universe following the Big Bang.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
Science
Fewer kids and more elderly -- not the end of the world

Amidst warnings that low fertility rates will strain government funds and lower the standard of living in many developed nations around the world, Ronald Lee and colleagues suggest that moderately low fertility rates and slowly-declining populations may actually improve standards of living.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
Science
A serpentine template for an all-terrain robot (part of the robotics special issue)

A study revealing how sidewinding snakes scale sandy slopes -- a difficult feat -- is helping scientists improve terrestrial robots. It may even help them build a bot that could navigate terrain that rolling robots cannot, like the hills inside a collapsed mine.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Prosthetic hands & arms that 'belong'

In the field of neuroprosthetics, scientists are getting closer to mimicking the intuitive control, freedom of movement, and sense of touch that people with natural limbs often take for granted. Dustin Tyler and colleagues provide the first long-term evidence that the under-the-skin wires and nerve electrodes for a neuroprosthetic hand can last after being subjected to real-world use by two adult male amputees.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Science
HIV’s shape-shifting envelope protein

A new imaging technique has revealed how the protein HIV uses to infect cells changes shape, and the results may offer new ways to attack the deadly virus with drugs and vaccines. The HIV-1 envelope protein, Env, can shift its shape to take on several different configurations, something it needs to do before the viral and host cell membranes can fuse.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
BioScience
Wildlife Refuge Plans Show Strengths and Weaknesses for Adaptation to Climate Change

Despite a plenitude of general advice for land managers facing climate change, few studies have examined what might be practical for conservation reserves. The US Fish and Wildlife Service’s comprehensive conservation plans for national wildlife refuges show that it is possible to incorporate many ideas into practice. But wider use of emerging decision-support tools and regional-level coordination could help managers better prepare for coming landscape-scale changes.

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Studies Examine Vaccination Strategies For Prevention, Control of Avian Flu

Two randomized trials in the October 8 issue of JAMA examine new vaccination strategies for the prevention and control of avian influenza, often referred to as “bird flu.” This is a theme issue on infectious disease.

Contact: Holly Korschun
Hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Nature Climate Change
98 per cent forward, 125 per cent back: China’s economic boom thwarts its carbon emissions goals

Efforts to reduce China’s carbon dioxide emissions are being offset by the country’s rampant economic growth, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).

Economic and Social Research Council, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Laura Potts
laura.potts@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-93007
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Public priorities in ocean protection

Public concern regarding anthropogenic ocean health impacts such as pollution, overfishing, and acidification is likely related to awareness about impacts, according to a study. Many efforts to achieve sustainable use of oceans rely on expert opinion to set priorities and policy, often without assessing public priorities and awareness of ocean issues.

Contact: Juan Carlos Castilla
jcastilla@bio.puc.cl
56-223-542-610
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Genetically influenced traits and educational achievement

According to a study, differences in children’s level of educational achievement are associated with a large group of inherited traits. Educational achievement is generally considered to be the result of environmental influences such as classroom environment and parental involvement, but recent research suggests that differences in educational achievement may be heritable.

Contact: Seil Collins
seil.collins@kcl.ac.uk
44-020-784-85377
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Antibiotic resistance in manure-treated soil

Manure fertilization may lead to blooms of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in soil, even when the manure comes from cows that have not been treated with antibiotics, according to a study. High use of antibiotics in agriculture prompts concerns over the contribution of livestock to antibiotic resistance.

Contact: Jo Handelsman
jo.handelsman@yale.edu
203-432-9119
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Predictive ability and autism spectrum disorders

Autism spectrum disorders may be partially attributable to an impaired ability to predict future events, researchers suggest. Predictive ability plays a role in individuals’ perception of and interaction with their surroundings.

Contact: Annie Cardinaux
anniec@mit.edu
617-324-5493
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Pollution reduction and low-carbon technologies

Constructing a low-carbon electricity infrastructure sufficient to meet projected 2050 electricity demands is feasible using current production levels of iron, copper, and cement, and may double electricity supply while stabilizing or reducing air and water pollution, according to a study.

Contact: Thomas Gibon
thomas.gibon@ntnu.no
474-101-5246
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of lunar rock samples from the Apollo missions finds that water in the moon’s surface minerals was likely generated by bombardment of particles from the solar wind and not by water-rich meteorite or comet impacts.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
“Virological Penicillin”:Plant MIR2911 directly targets influenza A viruses

In a new study, Chen-Yu Zhang’s group at Nanjing University present an extremely novel finding that a plant microRNA, MIR2911, which is enriched in honeysuckle, directly targets influenza A viruses (IAV) including H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9. Drinking of honeysuckle soup can prevent IAV infection and reduce H5N1-induced mice death.

This work was supported by grants from the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2014CB542300), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 81101330, 31271378 and 81250044), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Provin

Contact: Xi Chen
lisacx86@nju.edu.cn
0086-258-359-2706
Nanjing University School of Life Sciences

Showing releases 251-275 out of 732 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ]