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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 638 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Venomous cone snails may use insulin to net prey

Some predatory cone snails might use insulin contained in their venom to induce low blood sugar in schools of swimming fish, slowing down and netting prey through metabolic manipulation, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Arid air and language tonality

Climatic conditions such as temperature and humidity that affect the performance of the vocal folds may constrain development of complex tones in language to warm, humid regions, according to a study. Dry air can decrease the precision of pitch and tone produced by the vocal folds of the larynx, possibly impairing production of precise tones that can convey meaning in some languages and possibly acting as a climatic constraint on language development.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions reductions in Indonesia

A recent moratorium on deforestation activities in Indonesia has reduced greenhouse gas emissions but not to a level sufficient to reach current targets, according to a study. In May 2011, Indonesia instituted a two-year ban on issuing new concession licenses for logging and conversion of primary forests and peat lands to oil palm or pulp and paper tree plantations.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Canine distemper and Serengeti lions

A study in Tanzania suggests that domestic dogs may have spread canine distemper virus (CDV) to Serengeti lions but that subsequent infection peaks may have been caused by other carnivore species. CDV typically infects domestic dogs, but a 1994 Tanzania epidemic resulted in the die-off of approximately 30% of lions in the Serengeti ecosystem.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
California’s changing forests

A study of forest vegetation trends in California finds a decrease in large trees, an increase in forest density, and an increased abundance of oaks relative to pines, indicating changes associated with increased regional water stress, forest fire suppression, and changes in land use.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Metrics of film significance

An analysis of networks of citations among more than 15,000 films listed in the Internet Movie Database may produce several automated metrics of a film’s significance, according to a study. Judgments regarding the significance and quality of creative works are often difficult to make.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of more than 5,000 Himalayan mountain climbing expeditions involving climbers from 56 countries finds that expeditions from countries with hierarchical cultures had more climbers reaching the summit, but also more climbers dying along the way, than expeditions from countries with weak hierarchical values, a finding that illustrates the benefits and risks of hierarchical culture in high-stakes group dynamics.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Sensors
Optic fiber for recording the temperature in extreme industrial environments

Optic fiber is normally used in the field of telecommunications to transmit information using light, but a group of researchers at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) has developed a technique that makes it possible to use optic fiber as a thermometer in extreme industrial environments.

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 18-Jan-2015
SPECTAcolor viable next generation multinational cancer clinical trial infrastructure

SPECTAcolor's successful start has demonstrated its viability to facilitate next generation cancer clinical trials. It has been successfully implemented across 19 clinical centers located in nine countries in Europe, has now recruited over 500 patients since its launch in September 2013, and the observed frequency of mutations is similar to that observed in previous colorectal cancer clinical trials.

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
Science
Swelled tissues burst limits of microscope

There are limits to how well a light microscope can magnify the tiny details in a cell or tissue. So why not blow up the biological material itself to a larger size? That’s the solution proposed by Fei Chen and colleagues, who have designed a way to expand cells and brain tissue using a swellable polymer.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
Science
New vegetation record syncs with cenozoic climate record

Researchers have developed a way to reconstruct vegetation structure, or the degree of open forest canopy, and they used it to estimate what vegetation might have looked like during the middle Cenozoic Era (49 to 11 million years ago) in Patagonia.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
Science
Geese use “roller coaster” strategy to fly over Himalayas

By remotely monitoring bar-headed geese in the Himalayan Mountains, Charles Bishop and colleagues show that the birds hug the terrain as they fly, riding the peaks and valleys like the hills and dips of a roller coaster.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
Science
Opinions about ability might affect women’s academic participation

The results of a national survey in the United States suggest that the representation of women in academia might reflect peoples’ general attitudes about what it takes to excel in various disciplines. Specifically, researchers suggest that fewer women participate in fields that are perceived to require innate or raw talent -- and that more women gravitate to fields in which empathy or hard work is perceived to be key.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Pinning down the harmful mutations that cause heart muscle disease

A study of more than 5,000 people, one of the largest of its kind to date, uncovers the mutations in the giant muscle protein titin that cause dilated cardiomyopathy.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
JAMA
Use of surgical procedure to facilitate child birth declines

Between 2006 and 2012 in the U.S., there was a decline in rates of episiotomy, a surgical procedure for widening the outlet of the birth canal to make it easier for the mother to give birth, according to a study in the January 13 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Alexander M. Friedman, M.D.
amf2104@columbia.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
JAMA
Community-wide cardiovascular disease prevention programs associated with reductions in hospitalizations, deaths, over a 40 year period

In a rural Maine county, sustained, community-wide programs targeting cardiovascular risk factors and behavior changes were associated with reductions in hospitalization and death rates over a 40 year period (1970-2010) compared with the rest of the state, with substantial improvements seen for hypertension and cholesterol control and smoking cessation, according to a study in the January 13 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Roderick E. Prior, M.D.
reprior@fchn.org
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
PharmaMar will start a Phase III study of PM1183 in combination with doxorubicin in relapsed SCLC

The unparalleled results obtained in the Phase Ib study support the start of a head-to-head study in relapsed small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients that will compare the combination as second line therapy against topotecan, the only drug approved in the US and Europe for this indication

Contact: Carolina Pola
cpola@pharmamar.com
34-608-933-677
Pharmamar

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Geology
12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake: landslides and work by the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling Project

Two papers in the latest online postings for Geology cover the 12 May 2008 Wenchuan, China, earthquake. One, an open access article, reports the work of the Wenchuan Earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling Project. The second discusses earthquake-triggered landslides and the impact of the Mw 7.9 earthquake on river catchments in the Longmen Shan. This study concludes that the "earthquake memory" of rivers is longest where landsliding is highest and where rainfall is the least intense.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

An analysis of survey responses from 56,019 residents of the London Metropolitan area to questions about life satisfaction and personality traits suggests that an individual’s level of life satisfaction is associated with the degree to which their needs, which are influenced by their personality, are met by the characteristics of their neighborhood.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Understanding mass mortality events

Sudden, massive die-offs of some animal populations may be on the rise, and appear to be linked to rising incidence of disease, biotoxicity, and multiple interacting stressors, according to a study. Mass mortality events (MMEs) are rare instances of high mortality within a population that affect individuals across all age classes.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Infant napping and memory

Napping in infancy might orchestrate memory consolidation, a study suggests. Human infants spend large portions of their days napping, but few studies have uncovered evidence for a causal relationship between sleep and the high levels of growth and development that take place during the first year of life.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate models and Greenland meltwater release

Climate models may overestimate meltwater discharge from the Greenland Ice Sheet if they fail to account for water storage beneath the ice, a study suggests. Every summer, melt-prone areas on the Greenland Ice Sheet develop a well-organized, surface drainage system of streams, rivers, and moulins that drain and flush meltwater to the ocean.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cosmic ices and astrochemical evolution

Interstellar ices, found in abundance in the dense molecular clouds from which stars and planetary systems form, may evolve into key intermediates needed for life to take root on a lifeless planet, according to a study. Using laboratory experiments, Louis Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Uwe Meierhenrich, and colleagues reproduced the processes by which these ices evolve in interstellar space.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain effects of products containing bisphenol S/A

A study in zebrafish suggests that prenatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) or to a related chemical used in some BPA-free products may have measurable effects on brain development and behavior. A growing body of literature links prenatal exposure to BPA, an endocrine disruptor found in many household products, to behavioral problems during childhood, such as aggression and hyperactivity.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate change mitigation potential of urban centers

The structure of urban centers may influence the rate at which energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions increase in the coming decades, according to a study in the Industrial Ecology: The Role of Manufactured Capital for Sustainability Special Feature.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 251-275 out of 638 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]