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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 613 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 31-Jan-2014
Science
Chemical tricks in new hosts expand pathogen potpourri

A pathogen that has spent generations colonizing one host can make the leap to and successfully inhabit an entirely different one, and now a new report suggests biochemical changes pathogens initiate in their new hosts allow them to make this jump.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Jan-2014
Science
A map of disease-causing mutations?

Researchers have used a combination of genetics and functional analysis to create a map of mutations that contribute to hereditary spastic paraplegias, or HSPs -- inherited neurodegenerative disorders that cause stiffness and contraction in the lower limbs.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Jan-2014
Science
The ties that bind Neandertals and modern humans

Even though Neandertals went extinct a very long time ago, there’s still a little bit of their DNA in most all of us, a new study shows. And while the total amount of Neandertal sequence in any modern human is relatively low, the cumulative amount of the Neandertal genome that persists across all humans is 20 percent, this same report says.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Screening for transformed human mesenchymal stromal cells with tumorigenic potential

Spontaneous transformation of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) has been observed during long-term expansion in cell culture, although it is rare. Engrafting these transformed cells into immunodeficient mice leads to the formation of solid tumors. Using high-throughput profiling methods, a panel of RNA molecules was identified as potential biomarkers for screening for these transformed cells in cell culture.


Fndn for Liver & Gastrointestinal Res (SLO) Rotterdam; Netherlands Org for Scientific Res (NWO)

Contact: Dr. Qiuwei Pan
q.pan@erasmusmc.nl
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Antioxidants may raise cancer risk in certain high-risk patients

A new study helps explain why taking antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations, like smokers. Antioxidants are chemical compounds that delay some types of cell damage.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study reports that the blockade of signaling by OX40L and its receptor OX40—immune cell modulators that are primarily expressed in the inflamed joints of arthritic mice and humans with rheumatoid arthritis—reduced signs of joint inflammation and restored bone and cartilage integrity in arthritic mice, suggesting that OX40 and OX40L may be potential therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cooperation and wealth inequality among nations

Wealth inequality among nations can enhance cooperation on issues such as global climate change, a study finds. To date, global climate summits have faced conflicts over mitigation strategies between rich and poor countries. Addressing the issue from a theoretical perspective, Simon Levin and colleagues incorporated analogous real-world wealth inequality into a mathematical model called the public goods dilemma, a standard economics game in which participants must cooperate to enact collective action or risk overall collapse.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Role of seminal fluid in offspring metabolic health

Lack of seminal fluid during conception is tied to adverse metabolic effects in male offspring of mice, according to a study. Seminal fluid, produced by seminal vesicle glands, promotes sperm survival and function in the female reproductive tract, alters the female immune response to accommodate sperm and the zygote, and influences fetal metabolic processes.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Broad-spectrum influenza vaccine shows promise in mice and ferrets

Mice and ferrets inoculated with a broad-spectrum vaccine showed a greater immune response and greater protection to three strains of the H1N1 flu virus than from a traditional vaccine, according to a study. Every year, influenza vaccines are reformulated to protect against the new season’s flu strains.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles

A nanocomputer comprising interconnected nanowire tiles can perform integrated sequential and arithmetic computing tasks, according to a study. Physical limitations may impede further miniaturization of microelectronics using current silicon transistor designs. To develop a nanocomputer architecture that circumvents those physical limitations, Charles Lieber and colleagues synthesized nanowires with diameters less than 20 nanometers, and implemented an assembly technique to organize the nanowires into six highly-ordered nanowire crossbar arrays.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Honing early detection systems for hospital-acquired infections

Surveillance systems could help detect the early spread of healthcare-associated infections with the help of only a few sentinel hospitals, researchers report. Mariano Ciccolini and colleagues used recently developed mathematical models, as well as detailed information about patient movements between all hospitals in the closely linked national healthcare systems of England and the Netherlands, to simulate the spread of healthcare-associated infections among these hospitals.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
New biomedical diagnostics using personalized 3D imaging

Researchers at the firm 4DNature and the Universidad Carlos III of Madrid (UC3M) are developing a new technology, called helical optical projection tomography, which improves biomedical diagnostic 3D imaging.


Contact: ana herrera
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
The navigation and positioning performance of BeiDou comparable to that of GPS regionally

BeiDou regional navigation satellite system (BDS) also called BeiDou-2 has been in full operation since December 27, 2012. It is shown that the precision of BDS code and carrier phase measurements are about 33 cm and 2 mm, respectively, which are comparable to those of GPS, and the accuracy of BDS single point positioning has satisfied the design requirement.


National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41020144004, 41374019 and 41104022), and National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122501).

Contact: YANG Yuanxi
yuanxi_yang@163.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 26-Jan-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Geologic characteristics of the Chang’E-3 exploration region

Chinese researchers present topographic, geomorphologic and compositional characteristics of a 1°×1° (~660 km2) region centered near the landing site of Chang’E-3 using the highest spatial resolution data available.The relevant paper will be published on SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy 2014(3) issue.


National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41373066), the Key Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KGZD-EW-603), Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (SRFDP) (Grant No. 2013014513000

Contact: Guo Yuan-Yuan
guoyuanyuan@scichina.org
86-106-401-5835
Science China Press

Public Release: 26-Jan-2014
China Science Bulletin
Where did the sun come from?

In past decades astronomers have discovered several high-velocity stars in globular clusters, but no high-velocity star has been discovered in open clusters.A new study has discovered a high-velocity in open cluster M67, and it will provide clues to dynamical evolution of open clusters and the origin of the sun. This study will be published on CHINESE SCIENCE Bulletin(In Chinese).


School Foundation of Changzhou University (Grant Nos.1002121).

Contact: YAN Bei
yanbei@scichina.org
86-106-400-8316
Science China Press

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
Where’d you get that brand new gene?

Sometimes a non-coding DNA sequence can give rise to a unique, new (de novo) gene with its own specific role to play that may help in shaping the species. But, until now, researchers have not understood much about how this process works.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
Even without their vitamins, immune cells protect a host

Malnutrition zaps the immune system, reducing its strength and power, but now a new study shows that one of the most common malnutrition woes in the world -- lack of Vitamin A -- boosts levels of a key immune cell.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
Ancient dog cancer hints at first canine host

Researchers have provided the first whole-genome sequence of a transmissible tumor that originated in a single dog thousands of years ago and continues to spread among domestic dogs to this day. Their efforts shed light on the characteristics of the tumor’s original canine host, which they say likely resembled the modern Alaskan Malamute.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
Nothing sees color like the mantis shrimp

Why do the eyes of mantis shrimp have 12 different types of photoreceptors when four to seven are all that is needed to encode every color under the sun? A new study by Hanne Thoen and colleagues helps to solve this mystery by revealing that mantis shrimp rely on a unique, previously undocumented color vision system.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Science
New opportunity results complement curiosity’s

NASA’s Opportunity rover landed on Mars in 2004 -- more than eight years before the Curiosity rover touched down -- and new data from the mission is now showing that water stirred the rocks on the rim of the Endeavor Crater both before and after the ancient impact that formed it.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Form of estrogen may treat epileptic seizures

The sex hormone estradiol may be able to stop or reduce seizures associated with a severe form of childhood epilepsy, a new study reports. Treating epilepsy patients with the hormone could potentially improve the development of failing neurons responsible for seizures.


Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
JAMA
Biomarkers in blood show potential as early detection method of pancreatic cancer

Researchers have identified diagnostic microRNA panels in whole blood that had the ability to distinguish, to some degree, patients with and without pancreatic cancer, according to a study in the January 22/29 issue of JAMA. The authors caution that the findings are preliminary, and that further research is necessary to understand whether these microRNAs have clinical implications as a screening test for early detection of pancreatic cancer.


Contact: Julia S. Johansen, M.D., D.M.Sc.
julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
JAMA
Mediterranean diet associated with lower risk of peripheral artery disease

A multicenter study conducted in Spain finds that a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or with nuts is associated with a lower risk of peripheral artery disease, according to a study in the January 22/29 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Miguel A. Martinez-Gonzalez, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.
mamartinez@unav.es
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study reports that individuals whose breast tumors expressed high levels of the enzyme TBK1 responded poorly to tamoxifen treatment and had a high potential for relapse, and suggests that TBK1 may be a predictive marker of tamoxifen resistance and a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How zebrafish pigment cells form stripes

The signature stripes of the zebrafish reflect movement and interactions between pigment cells across the animal’s skin, according to a study. Although researchers have long noted that mathematical models can accurately reproduce many of the animal kingdom’s characteristic stripes and spots, the biological processes behind animal patterning remain largely unexplained.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 251-275 out of 613 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]