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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 552 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Progress in probing dynamical responses of heterogeneous materials

Energy transformation and dissipation mechanisms in dynamical responses of heterogeneous materials are far from clear to scientists, which challenges their engineering applications. Researchers in Beijing point out that these complex multi-scale behaviors can be probed via a series of coarse-grained modelings. The similarity parameters, invariants and slow-varying quantities are independent variables in constructing constitutive relations. A set of new schemes are proposed to analyze the complex structures and some hidden underlying mechanisms are revealed.

Science Foundation of LCP, National Natural Science Foundation of China [under Grant Nos. 11475028 and 11325209],etc.

Contact: XU Aiguo
Xu_Aiguo@iapcm.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
PolyU develops perovskite-silicon tandem solar cells with highest efficiency

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has successfully developed perovskite-silicon tandem solar cells with the world’s highest power conversion efficiency of 25.5% recently.

Contact: Hailey Lai
hailey.lai@polyu.edu.hk
852-340-03853
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Nano Research
Facile fabrication of a nanoporous Si/Cu composite and its application as a high-performance anode in lithiumion batteries

Nanoporous (NP) Si/Cu composites with different Cu contents are easily fabricated by means of alloy refining followed by facile electroless dealloying in mild conditions. NP-Si/Cu composites show a three-dimensional porous network nanoarchitecture with conductive Cu network embedded. With the advantages of rich porosity and integration of Cu into a nanoporous Si backbone, the NP-SiCu composites exhibit much higher cycling reversibility than pure NP-Si as an anode material for LIBs.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Nano Research
A facile surfactant-free synthesis of Rh flower-like nanostructures

A facile, surfactant-free synthesis of Rh flowerlike nanostructure was developed by hydrothermal reduction of Rh(acac)3 with formaldehyde. The unique Rh nanoflowers were constructed from ultrathin nanosheets with specific surface area of 79.3 m2g−1, which was much larger than that of commercial Rh black. The Rh nanoflowers exhibited excellent catalytic performance in the catalytic hydrogenation of phenol and cyclohexene, in contrast to the commercial Rh black.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of 151 people in Spain suggests that when people become unemployed, their acknowledgement of earned entitlement, the notion that rewards should be correlated with effort or performance, declines relative to people who remain employed, as measured using a monetary allocation task.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Lemur extinction and Madagascar’s forest health

The extinction of lemurs that enable seed dispersal could adversely affect the health of Madagascar’s forests, a study reports.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How LSD affects the human brain

A neuroimaging study of the hallucinatory and consciousness-altering properties of LSD could guide the use of psychedelic drugs for modeling and treating psychiatric diseases.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Colaughter and friendship status

Simultaneous laughter between individuals in a group might be a cross-cultural indicator of relationship quality, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ape malaria vectors and host specificity

Researchers have identified vectors for malaria transmission in African great apes and found that these vectors can act as bridge vectors between apes and humans.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Origins of advanced mathematical ability

Researchers report evidence for the neural basis of advanced mathematical thinking.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Handwriting analysis hints at timing of Hebrew biblical texts

Analysis of inscriptions on ceramic shards excavated from a desert fortress in southern Judah provides insights into the composition of key biblical texts before the fall of Jerusalem in 586 BCE, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reconstructing history of Chauvet-Pont d’Arc cave

Researchers report a chronology for Paleolithic human and animal occupation of the Chauvet-Pont d’Arc cave based on radiocarbon dates.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Effects of human activities on tropical rainforests

A four-decade-long study finds that human activities peripheral to tropical nature reserves can affect the reserves’ long-term composition, structure, and biomass.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
JAMA
Multifaceted quality improvement intervention does not reduce risk of death in ICUs

Implementation of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention with daily checklists, goal setting, and clinician prompting did not reduce in-hospital mortality compared with routine care among critically ill patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs) in Brazil, according to a study appearing in the April 12, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Alexandre B. Cavalcanti
abiasi@hcor.com.br
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 12-Apr-2016
JAMA
Decrease in air pollution associated with decrease in respiratory symptoms among children in southern California

Decreases in ambient air pollution levels over the past 20 years in Southern California were associated with significant reductions in bronchitic symptoms in children with and without asthma, according to a study appearing in the April 12, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Zen Vuong
zvuong@usc.edu
213-740-5277
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 11-Apr-2016
Science
Zika virus tested in brain precursor cells

Zika virus preferentially kills developing brain cells, a new study reports. The results offer evidence for how Zika virus may cause brain defects in babies – and specifically microcephaly, a rare birth defect in which the brain fails to grow properly.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Apr-2016
BioScience
Current methods cannot predict damage to coral reefs

Coral reefs are severely endangered by a warming and increasingly acidic ocean. Although species-level effects have been studied, these pieces of the puzzle have not been assembled into a broader view. Ecosystem-level effects may be more severe than is currently anticipated.

National Science Foundation, Moorea Coral Reef LTER, California State University -- Northridge

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@gmail.com
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 8-Apr-2016
China Science Bulletin
A high throughput and accurate biomarker screening technique

More specific and sensitive biomarkers in early diagnosis and prognosis are required for curing and preventing cancer. A study reviewed all current developed isobaric terminal labeling quantification techniques and their applications in cancer biomarker research.

Major State Basic Research Development Program,National Natural Science Foundation of China,etc.

Contact: Lu Haojie
luhaojie@fudan.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 8-Apr-2016
Science
Special issue: Cancer metastasis

This special issue on cancer, largely focused on metastasis, features two Reviews, two Perspectives, an editorial and a feature story that highlight the latest advancements in understanding how cancer cells spread and the best means to prevent this dissemination from occurring.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-Apr-2016
Science
New cloud measurements are predicting a warmer climate

Models that aim to predict human-induced global average temperature rise have been underestimating important contributions from clouds, perhaps causing projections to be, in some simulations, as much as 1.3°C lower than what might occur, a new study suggests.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-Apr-2016
Science
Predicting a person’s distinct brain connectivity

A new model is able to predict individual, task-specific brain connectivity based on MRIs of a person’s brain at rest.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-Apr-2016
Science
Brief face-to-face talk can shift anti-transgender attitudes

Door-to-door canvassers who had brief conversations with Florida residents measurably changed attitudes toward transgender people, a new study finds.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Nano Research
Mirror-twin induced bicrystalline inAs nanoleaves

This study reveals the formation of bicrystalline InAs nanoleaves driven by catalyst energy minimization. The relatively low-energy {122} or {133} mirror twins lead to the identical lateral growth of twinned structured, which results in the symmetrical formation of nanoleaves. A bio-inspired nanotechnology design can be created for future electronic or optoelectronic devices by correlating the structure of InAs nanoleaves in the nanoworld and that of real leaves in the natural world.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Nano Research
Novel synthesis of N-doped graphene as an efficient electrocatalyst towards oxygen reduction

N-doped porous graphene was successfully synthesized by a simple and scalable bottom-up method. The subsequent annealing step promoted the conversion of N-containing species from pyrrolic N to pyridinic N, leading to a remarkably improvement of electrochemical performance towards the oxygen reduction reaction. The theoretical simulations indicated that the rapid H transfer and thermodynamic stability of six-membered N structure boost the transformation of N-containing species.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
PolyU breaks the world record of fastest optical communications for data centers

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has achieved the world’s fastest optical communications speed for data centers by reaching 240 G bit/s over 2km, 24 times of the existing speed available in the market.

Contact: Margaret Ho
margaret.fc.ho@polyu.edu.hk
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Showing releases 226-250 out of 552 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]