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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 562 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Potassium channels and binge drinking

Researchers report a link between potassium channels in the brain and the tendency for binge drinking in mice. Ion channels called G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels regulate neuronal excitability. Such channels can be activated by ethanol, but the role of the activation in the behavioral effects of ethanol consumption is unclear.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Linking microbiome samples to human sources

Researchers report unique and stable metagenomic codes for the identification of human microbiome samples. Blood types and genomic variation have long been used to single out individuals in forensics, genealogy, and disaster response, but the microbiome, the complement of microbes found in each person, has so far failed to yield fingerprints, partly due to the lack of robust, stable, and specific codes for individual microbiomes in populations.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
JAMA
Public health advisories associated with reductions in dispensing of codeine to postpartum women

Public health advisories from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Health Canada were associated with significant reductions in the rate of dispensing of codeine to postpartum women, according to a study in the May 12 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Kate Smolina, Ph.D.
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 11-May-2015
JAMA Internal Medicine
Mediterranean diet supplemented with olive oil or nuts associated with improved cognitive function

Supplementing the plant-based Mediterranean diet with antioxidant-rich extra virgin olive oil or mixed nuts was associated with improved cognitive function in a study of older adults in Spain but the authors warn more investigation is needed, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Contact: Emilio Ros,M.D.,Ph.D.
eros@clini.ub.es
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Science
GTEx -- How our fenetic code regulates gene expression

A new study presents the first analysis of the pilot dataset from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, which investigates how our underlying DNA regulates gene expression. All the cells in a person's body have the same genes.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Science
Mercury’s core dynamo present early in planet’s history

The Messenger spacecraft, which crash-landed into Mercury just a few days ago, found traces of magnetization in Mercury’s crust, a new study reports. The presence of residual magnetization provides insights into the planet’s evolution.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Science
Additional benefits of measles vaccination revealed

Vaccination against measles doesn’t just protect people from the measles virus -- it also prevents other infectious diseases from taking advantage of peoples’ immune systems after they have been damaged by measles, according to a new study.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Science
Facebook users the main filter of content

Do online social networks, such as Facebook, create “filter bubbles” around their users so that people only see what they want to see? Eytan Bakshy and colleagues analyzed the activity of more than 10 million Facebook users to find out -- and their results suggest that, even though the Web site does filter content for its users, those users are still their own biggest censors.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Breakthrough in OLED technology

Now a new study from a team of researchers in California and Japan shows that OLEDs made with finely patterned structures can produce bright, low-power light sources, a key step toward making organic lasers. The results are reported in a paper appearing this week on the cover of the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Mobile phone microscope detects parasitic worm in blood

A handheld device converts a mobile phone into a video microscope that can rapidly and accurately detect the parasitic worm Loa loa in the blood, a new study reports. A field test in 33 patients in Cameroon demonstrated its potential as a diagnostic tool to determine, within minutes, whether patients can be safely treated with an antiparasitic drug that causes brain damage in some people with L. loa.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Artificial muscles created from gold-plated onion cells

Unlike previous artificial muscles, artificial muscles, created from gold-plated onion cells by a group of researchers from National Taiwan University, can either expand or contract to bend in different directions depending on the driving voltage applied. The finding is published this week in the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Printing silicon on paper, with lasers

Recently, a group of researchers at Delft University of Technology, in the Netherlands, has pioneered a method that allows silicon itself, in the polycrystalline form used in circuitry, to be produced directly on a substrate from liquid silicon ink with a single laser pulse -- potentially ousting its pale usurpers.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Journal of Applied Physics
Extreme-temperature electronics

A team of researchers from the University of California, Riverside and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute discovered that molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a semiconductor material, may be a promising candidate to make thin-film transistors for extreme temperature applications.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of sediment cores from floodplain lakes near the Mississippi River finds that the prehistoric settlement of Cahokia, near present-day Saint Louis, Missouri, emerged as a regional center around AD 1050 during a period free of large floods, and that abandonment by AD 1350 may have been because of flooding, a finding highlighting the role of flood frequency in the rise and fall of early agricultural societies.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ultrasound production and sonar jamming by moths

The emergence of insectivorous bats likely drove the evolution of ultrasound detection and sonar-jamming ultrasound production in moths, according to a study. Many moth species have ears that are sensitive to the ultrasonic sound waves produced by bat sonar, and some moths also produce ultrasonic sound.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bird-feeding pastime might ruffle species balance

A study suggests that the urban pastime of feeding wild birds might upset the delicate balance between native and introduced bird species. In 2002 alone, more than 450 million kg of seeds were fed to wild birds as a pastime in the United States, by some estimates.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Groundwater contamination near Marcellus Shale gas wells

A sensitive analytical technique detects potential drinking water contamination by Marcellus Shale gas wells, according to a study. High-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) employs volumes of water, sand, and chemicals under extreme pressure to create cracks in deep rock formations, releasing natural gas deposits.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gradual evolution of bioluminescence in millipedes

Reconstructing the evolutionary history of a recently discovered bioluminescent millipede suggests that luminous millipedes likely experienced a gradual escalation of bioluminescent intensity through evolutionary time.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Autism and visual noise sensitivity

Certain perceptual impairments in autism spectrum disorder may be associated with a heightened sensitivity to sensory noise rather than with deficiencies in sensory integration, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Glucose, fructose, and appetite

Fructose may enhance the reward value of high-calorie food and promote eating, compared with glucose, according to a study. Differences in metabolism of fructose and glucose may lead to differential effects on physiological and behavioral responses to food.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-May-2015
JAMA
Studies show effectiveness of new combination treatment for HCV patients with or without cirrhosis

In two studies appearing in the May 5 issue of JAMA, patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection and with or without cirrhosis achieved high rates of sustained virologic response after 12 weeks of treatment with a combination of the direct-acting-antiviral drugs daclatasvir, asunaprevir, and beclabuvir.

Contact: Fred Poordad,M.D.
amiha.khanna@duke.edu
210-567-3026
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Biomicrofluidics
Detecting cryptosporidium in China

Recently, researchers at Fudan University's Institute of Biomedical Sciences in Shanghai developed a lab-on-a-chip device that can rapidly diagnose Cryptosporidium infections from just a finger prick -- potentially bringing point-of-care diagnosis to at-risk areas in rural China in order to improve treatment outcomes.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Electronics you can wrap around your finger

Researchers from South Korea have taken a new step toward more bendable devices by manufacturing a thin film that keeps its useful electric and magnetic properties even when highly curved.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Science
Pre-human extinction rates reveal risks in the tropics

By combining data on the extinction rates of marine species over the past 23 million years with data on human activity and climate change, researchers have identified specific taxa and regions of the world -- the vast majority of them in the tropics -- that might be particularly vulnerable to extinction in the future.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 1-May-2015
Science
Personalized messages between brain regions revealed

A new study in live rats shows that the hippocampus -- an area of the vertebrate brain associated with spatial memory, anxiety, and reward -- selectively targets other brain regions with specific information. Until now, researchers had wondered whether such higher brain areas route communication to every component of the brain, leaving it up to the receiving regions to extract relevant information, or if they sent messages separately to different parts of the brain.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 226-250 out of 562 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]