EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
2-Feb-2015 05:09
Beijing Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Breaking News

Multimedia Gallery

Subscribe/Sponsor

Interviews

Events Calendar

Selected Science Sources in China

MOST

CAS

CAE

CAST

NSFC

CASS

CAAS

CAMS

RSS

EurekAlert!

Text Size Option

Language

English (英文)

Chinese (中文)

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 664 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 ]

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Factors associated with bee decline

A study suggests that loss of preferred host plants may be a key factor associated with bee decline. The decline in populations of both wild and managed bees has provoked concerns over the likelihood of a global pollination crisis.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Explaining extreme Beijing haze

Beijing’s severe air pollution might be attributed to its traffic, industrial emissions, and meteorology, a study suggests. China has recently experienced unprecedented increases in haze pollution due to fine particulate matter (PM) across many cities.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Arqueología de la arquitectura
Biopolitics for understanding social regulation and control

People, as the biological beings that we are, can be socially regulated by mechanisms such as taxes, property or family relationships. This constitutes part of the social policy that the Roman government put into practice during its expansion throughout the Mediterranean, which left its mark on the eastern plateau of Spain, the historical Celt Iberian territory, as has been shown by biopolitical research that was recently carried out at la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M).

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Four outstanding early-career journalists from China and India named EurekAlert! Fellows

Four outstanding early-career science journalists from India and China have been named winners of the 2015 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters, awarded by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general scientific organization, which publishes the Science family of journals.

Contact: Brian Lin
blin@aaas.org
202-326-6213
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
BMSCs transplantation increases the number of rat hippocampal neurons after cold stress

Compulsive swimming in cold water, a commonly used cold stress experiment, can result in rat learning and memory impairments associated with abnormal hippocampal structure.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Does long-term scopolamine use influence nerve cells in adult mouse dentate gyrus?

Long term administration of scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, can inhibit the survival of newly generated cells, leading to cognitive disorders in humans and animals, but its effect on the proliferation, differentiation and migration of nerve cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus remain poorly understood.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 22-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Inflammatory response and neuronal necrosis in rats with cerebral ischemia

In the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of ischemic injury, inflammation primarily occurs in the infarct and peripheral zones. In the ischemic zone, neurons undergo necrosis and apoptosis, and a large number of reactive microglia are present.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 22-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Mild hypothermia and NSCs transplantation protect against hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

Neural stem cells (NSCs) transplantation is a useful treatment for ischemic stroke, but apoptosis often occurs in the hypoxic-ischemic environment of the brain after cell transplantation.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 22-Nov-2014
Structural Dynamics
New model clarifies photoexcited thin-film lattice dynamics

A research team from Germany developed an analytical model to describe the structural dynamics of photoexcited thin films and verified it by ultrafast X-ray diffraction.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Science
Making better vaccines by getting ahead of flu evolution

It may be better to pre-emptively vaccinate against likely future strains of the influenza virus than to use a strain already circulating in the human population, a new study shows. This knowledge could help scientists make an already effective vaccine even more effective.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Science
Unexpected benefits of HIV drugs revealed in mice

A new study in mice shows that a popular class of HIV drugs, known as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), is effective in treating disorders such as retinal degeneration and graft-versus-host disease.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Science
Humans needed barley to reach the roof of the world

It took the arrival of western cereal grains, particularly barley, for humans to establish permanent residence above 3,000 meters on the Tibetan Plateau, researchers say. Despite evidence of intermittent human settlements in the region dating back to at least 20,000 years ago, Fahu Chen and colleagues say that humans didn’t get a solid foothold there -- the so-called “roof of the world” -- until about 5,200 years ago.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Repair effects of VEGF165-transfected NSCs transplantation in cerebral palsy rats

Repair effects of VEGF165-transfected NSCs transplantation in cerebral palsy rats

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Embryonic neural stem cell apoptosis in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Embryonic neural stem cell apoptosis in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Neurotrophic factors: from neurodevelopmental regulators to novel therapies for PD

Neurotrophic factors: from neurodevelopmental regulators to novel therapies for Parkinson’s disease

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Maternal gut microbiota influences fetal blood-brain barrier

Research in mice reveals that a mother’s gut microbiota may affect fetal blood-brain barrier development. The findings hint that environmental cues during pregnancy such as diet may influence the genes responsible for forming and maintaining the blood-brain barrier, which protects the brain from many common bacterial infections.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
Mouse-to-human genome comparison explains DNA evolution

A comprehensive study comparing regions of mouse and human DNA that control gene expression reveals that about a third of them are conserved between the two species, which separated approximately 550 million years ago. The dataset provided here will be useful to researchers trying to understand how mammalian regulatory DNA has evolved.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
The anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-xL is necessary for normal neuronal process extension

Bcl-xL is a pro-survival protein that interacts with outer mitochondrial membrane proteins and also with the ATP synthase at the inner membrane. Bcl-xL conserves neuronal energy and facilitates synaptic function. We report that Bcl-xL is required for normal outgrowth of neuronal processes. Our findings suggest that Bcl-xL regulates specific molecular pathways opposed by Death Receptor 6 in order to produce protection of neurites during hypoxia and to regulate neuronal process pruning during development and plasticity.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Microfluidic systems for axonal growth and regeneration research

Microfluidic systems for axonal growth and regeneration research

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Transcranial magnetic stimulation: potential treatment for co-occurring alcohol, TBI and PTSD

Transcranial magnetic stimulation: potential treatment for co-occurring alcohol, traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorders

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mapping the vulnerability of Ebola virus

Researchers report a structural analysis of the antibodies in ZMapp™, an experimental treatment against Ebola virus infection that is now under development. Comprised of a cocktail of antibodies raised in rodents and modified for human use, ZMapp™ was administered to several patients during the ongoing 2014 Ebola virus outbreak, but the antibodies’ mechanism of action remains unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Virus implicated in sea star wasting disease

A study shows that sea star wasting disease (SSWD) is likely caused by a virus and identifies a densovirus, present in the environment since at least 1942, that may be responsible. Since 2013, at least 20 sea star species have suffered heavy losses along the Pacific coast between Alaska and Mexico due to an unknown cause.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

According to a Perspective, intermittent energy restrictions such as alternate-day fasting or overnight fasting can counteract disease processes by spurring fat metabolism, reducing systemic inflammation, and stimulating cellular repair mechanisms.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ethnic diversity and price bubbles

A region’s ethnic diversity can mitigate stock market bubbles by improving traders’ pricing accuracy, according to a study. Price bubbles, in which traders collectively price assets above their true value, can financially devastate individuals and nations, but their causes remain elusive.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Obesity effects from circadian misalignment

A study indicates that nightshift work reduces total daily energy expenditure. While eating at times when circadian rhythms promote sleep is emerging as a risk factor for obesity, the mechanism by which circadian misalignment may lead to weight gain in humans is unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 226-250 out of 664 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 ]