EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
24-Apr-2014 06:40
Beijing Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Breaking News

Multimedia Gallery

Subscribe/Sponsor

Interviews

Events Calendar

Selected Science Sources in China

MOST

CAS

CAE

CAST

NSFC

CASS

CAAS

CAMS

RSS

EurekAlert!

Text Size Option

Language

English (英文)

Chinese (中文)

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 619 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Regenerating heart muscle with gene therapy

Gene therapy can help regenerate heart muscle in pigs, a new study reports. CCNA2 is a gene that tells embryonic heart cells to divide and grow. Because this fetal gene pathway becomes dormant after birth in both animals and humans, adult heart muscle cells cannot divide readily in response to an injury like a heart attack.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
JAMA
Study finds low rate of surgical site infections following ambulatory surgery

In an analysis that included nearly 300,000 patients from eight states who underwent ambulatory surgery (surgery performed on a person who is admitted to and discharged from a hospital on the same day), researchers found that the rates of surgical site infections were relatively low; however, the absolute number of patients with these complications is substantial, according to a study in the February 19 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Claudia A. Steiner, M.D., M.P.H.
Alison.Hunt@ahrq.hhs.gov
301-427-1244
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
JAMA
Medication to treat agitation for Alzheimer disease shows mixed results

The use of the medication citalopram was associated with a reduction in agitation in patients with Alzheimer disease, although at the dosage used in the study, patients experienced mild cognitive and cardiac adverse effects that might limit the practical application of this medication at the dosage of 30 mg per day, according to a study in the February 19 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Anton P. Porsteinsson, M.D.
Julie_Philipp@urmc.rochester.edu
585-275-1309
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of 1,858 adolescents, ages 12-19, in the United Kingdom suggests potential biomarkers for major depressive disorder in some boys based on longitudinal measurements of morning salivary cortisol and self-reported questionnaires of depressive symptoms.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Vaccine efficacy and distance to health services

Results of a pneumococcal vaccine study in Bohol, Philippines provide a method for designing targeted vaccine strategies, according to a study. Vaccination against pneumococcal diseases can prevent childhood pneumonia, yet the cost of these vaccines is a deterrent to their incorporation in many developing countries.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Energy efficiency in biomass-powered vehicles

A study finds that biomass-derived field-to-wheels energy efficiency in heavy-duty vehicles will likely be higher in vehicles powered by biofuel than those powered by biomass-derived electricity. As the world evaluates future transportation alternatives, efficiency, defined as work delivered per unit resource used, is a key metric.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Uncertainty and chronic stress during financial crisis

Chronically elevated levels of the stress hormone cortisol may promote risk aversion, a finding that may explain the "irrational pessimism" observed among traders during financial crises, according to a study. Most economists assume that the propensity for risk-taking is a stable trait. But John Coates and colleagues previously observed that cortisol levels rise substantially in traders when market volatility increases.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Potential biomarker for major depressive disorder

A study reveals that nanoscale-sized grains rotate as ultrafine materials deform under high pressure, a finding with implications for understanding the strength and lifetime of structural materials and the formation of minerals in Earth’s interior.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2014
China Science Bulletin
New evidence for the use of fire by Peking Man

Whether Peking Man had the ability for controlled use of fire has long been a central issue. The research of newly excavated possible remnants of use of fire in Layer 4, Locality 1 of Zhoukoudian, reveals that these sediments could be heated over 700˚C, which provide robust evidence for controlled use of fire by Peking Man. This study has been published in CHINESE SCIENCE BULLETIN (In Chinese), 2014, No.8.


Special Basic Research Project of MOST of China (Grant No. 2007FY110200)

Contact: YAN Bei
yanbei@scichina.org
86-106-400-8316
Science China Press

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
AAAS 2014 Annual Meeting
Transfer of knowledge learned seen as a key to improving science education

Attendees of a workshop at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science will be immersed into "active learning," an approach inspired by national reports targeting U.S. science education, in general, and, more specifically, the 60 percent dropout rate of students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).


Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
The Journal of Pediatrics
In-hospital formula use deters breastfeeding

Formula feeding in hospitals greatly increases the risk of not fully breastfeeding in the baby's second month of life and of early breastfeeding cessation, even when mothers have expressed a strong desire to breastfeed for longer, according to researchers from a UC Davis study.


Contact: Tricia Tomiyoshi
tricia.tomiyoshi-marsom@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9706
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
Science
Builder bots ditch blueprints for local cues

Imagine telling robots to go build a five-bedroom house for you without giving them any blueprints.

Now, scientists in the 14 February issue of the journal Science report they have created small robots that can do just that – build without a centralized plan – and termites were their muse.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
Science
Novel mutation affects brain-folding protein

A new study tying a particular gene to the development of cortical convolutions -- the prominent folds on the surface of the human brain -- suggests that these characteristic contours are formed and controlled in sections. Byoung-il Bae and colleagues studied the genomes of five individuals from three different families who had abnormally thin and smooth cortical convolutions in Broca’s area, or the brain’s language center.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
Science
How oil spills hurt tuna hearts

A new study shows why the toxic compounds from an oil spill, known to be damaging to fish hearts, cause the damage they do. The mechanism the study exposes reveals the susceptibility of the vertebrate heart to the toxic compounds present in the oil distributed so widely today.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
Science
Fire ants falling to acid-covered crazy ants

Residents of the United States’ Gulf Coast are getting used to the sting of tawny crazy ants and starting to forget about the fire ants that dominated the region since the 1930s. These invasive tawny crazy ants, which have been rapidly displacing colonies of fire ants in many southern U.S. states, employ a unique chemical defense that allows them to best fire ants in battle, according to a new study.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
Science
Science Advances

The mission of the nonprofit American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the publisher of Science, is to advance science for the benefit of all humankind. Science contributes to that mission by communicating the very best research across the full range of scientifi c fi elds to an extremely broad international audience.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Receptor clean outs amyloid beta, may protect against Alzheimer’s

Raising levels of a receptor called SORLA may protect the brain from Alzheimer’s, a new study in mice reports. SORLA is found in healthy neurons, and is known to sweep out unwanted amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide in the brain. Aβ plaques, which can impair the function and viability of nerve cells, are believed to be a major culprit in Alzheimer’s disease.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
JAMA
Fewer doses of HPV vaccine still results in reduced risk of STD

Although maximum reduction in the risk of genital warts (condylomata) was seen after 3 doses of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, receipt of 2 vaccine doses was associated with considerable reduction in risk, particularly among women who were younger than 17 years at first vaccination, according to a study in the February 12 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Lisen Arnheim-Dahlström, Ph.D.
lisen.arnheim.dahlstrom@ki.se
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
JAMA
Preterm infants more likely to have elevated insulin levels in early childhood

Researchers have found that preterm infants are more likely to have elevated insulin levels at birth and in early childhood compared to full-term infants, findings that provide additional evidence that preterm birth may be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, according to a study in the February 12 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Xiaobin Wang, M.D., M.P.H., Sc.D.
tmparson@jhsph.edu
410-955-7619
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Lévy flight random search patterns, which involve random walks with a scale-independent jump-length distribution, may not be the optimal search pattern for locating sparse unknown resources in conditions with an external drift, such as a current; in these cases, random Brownian motion may be the most efficient search pattern to locate resources and prevent overshooting the target, according to a study.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Origins of bottle gourds in the New World

Bottle gourds likely arrived in the New World via ocean currents from Africa, according to a study. The global ubiquity of domesticated bottle gourds (Lagenaria siceraria) in pre-Columbian times raises the question of how they had spread among Africa, Asia, and the Americas by 10,000-11,000 years ago.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fruit fly pheromone and sexual behavior

The evolution of a fruit fly pheromone likely allowed males to exploit the pre-existing sensory biases of other males, a study suggests. Animals exhibit a vast array of traits to compete for mates, but how these sexual features arise and evolve is unclear.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal rather than adult insulin-expressing cells

A study finds that insulin-producing β cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) resemble fetal rather than adult human β cells, potentially explaining why current efforts to generate insulin-producing cells from hPSCs result in cells that fail to properly secrete insulin in response to glucose.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Urban adaptation and regional climate warming

Urban adaptation strategies such as green roof, cool roof, and hybrid technologies can help offset not only future climate warming due to urban expansion but also temperature increases driven by greenhouse gases, according to a study. Recent modeling studies have suggested that in the absence of adaptive urban design the spread of population centers in the United States during the coming century could raise temperatures by as many as 3 degrees—independently of greenhouse gas-induced warming.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Brain Injury
Researchers call for more study into impact of repetitive heading in soccer

Soccer is the most-popular and fastest-growing sport in the world and, like many contact sports, players are at risk of suffering concussions from collisions on the field.


Contact: Leslie Shepherd
shepherdl@smh.ca
416-864-6094
St. Michael's Hospital

Showing releases 226-250 out of 619 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]