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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 614 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
Science
Science Advances

The mission of the nonprofit American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the publisher of Science, is to advance science for the benefit of all humankind. Science contributes to that mission by communicating the very best research across the full range of scientifi c fi elds to an extremely broad international audience.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Receptor clean outs amyloid beta, may protect against Alzheimer’s

Raising levels of a receptor called SORLA may protect the brain from Alzheimer’s, a new study in mice reports. SORLA is found in healthy neurons, and is known to sweep out unwanted amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide in the brain. Aβ plaques, which can impair the function and viability of nerve cells, are believed to be a major culprit in Alzheimer’s disease.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
JAMA
Fewer doses of HPV vaccine still results in reduced risk of STD

Although maximum reduction in the risk of genital warts (condylomata) was seen after 3 doses of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, receipt of 2 vaccine doses was associated with considerable reduction in risk, particularly among women who were younger than 17 years at first vaccination, according to a study in the February 12 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Lisen Arnheim-Dahlström, Ph.D.
lisen.arnheim.dahlstrom@ki.se
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
JAMA
Preterm infants more likely to have elevated insulin levels in early childhood

Researchers have found that preterm infants are more likely to have elevated insulin levels at birth and in early childhood compared to full-term infants, findings that provide additional evidence that preterm birth may be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, according to a study in the February 12 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Xiaobin Wang, M.D., M.P.H., Sc.D.
tmparson@jhsph.edu
410-955-7619
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Lévy flight random search patterns, which involve random walks with a scale-independent jump-length distribution, may not be the optimal search pattern for locating sparse unknown resources in conditions with an external drift, such as a current; in these cases, random Brownian motion may be the most efficient search pattern to locate resources and prevent overshooting the target, according to a study.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Origins of bottle gourds in the New World

Bottle gourds likely arrived in the New World via ocean currents from Africa, according to a study. The global ubiquity of domesticated bottle gourds (Lagenaria siceraria) in pre-Columbian times raises the question of how they had spread among Africa, Asia, and the Americas by 10,000-11,000 years ago.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fruit fly pheromone and sexual behavior

The evolution of a fruit fly pheromone likely allowed males to exploit the pre-existing sensory biases of other males, a study suggests. Animals exhibit a vast array of traits to compete for mates, but how these sexual features arise and evolve is unclear.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal rather than adult insulin-expressing cells

A study finds that insulin-producing β cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) resemble fetal rather than adult human β cells, potentially explaining why current efforts to generate insulin-producing cells from hPSCs result in cells that fail to properly secrete insulin in response to glucose.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Urban adaptation and regional climate warming

Urban adaptation strategies such as green roof, cool roof, and hybrid technologies can help offset not only future climate warming due to urban expansion but also temperature increases driven by greenhouse gases, according to a study. Recent modeling studies have suggested that in the absence of adaptive urban design the spread of population centers in the United States during the coming century could raise temperatures by as many as 3 degrees—independently of greenhouse gas-induced warming.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Brain Injury
Researchers call for more study into impact of repetitive heading in soccer

Soccer is the most-popular and fastest-growing sport in the world and, like many contact sports, players are at risk of suffering concussions from collisions on the field.


Contact: Leslie Shepherd
shepherdl@smh.ca
416-864-6094
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 10-Feb-2014
Research analyzes the cultural construction of nudes in Roman mosaics

The female nudes in Roman mosaics exalt beauty, the carnality and eroticism, while male bodies reflect determination, strength and power. This is one of the conclusions of research being carried out at the Universidad Carlos III in Madrid (UC3M) that analyzed the cultural construction and ideological implications of these artistic representations in which female predominate as compared to those of males.


Contact: ana herrera
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Science
2013 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge winners announced

Dramatic video that shows the effect of particles and energy from the Sun on Earth’s climate and weather is among the first place winners of the 2013 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge, sponsored jointly by the journal Science and the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF).


Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Science
When treatment promotes metastasis

A strategy designed to treat primary tumors may actually promote the spread of the tumor cells elsewhere in the body, a new study shows. In cancer, therapy aims to kill the primary tumor and prevent metastasis.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Science
Protein that distracts antibodies helps pathogens

By binding to and distracting most all antibodies that come its way, a newly discovered protein prevents antibodies from doing their job, a new study shows. The activity of this protein, dubbed Protein M, represents a novel way for bacteria to evade the immune system.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Science
Atmospheric circulation on repeat in Southern Hemisphere

In Earth’s Southern Hemisphere, the atmosphere circulates in a pattern that repeats itself about every 20 to 30 days, researchers say. Their discovery is surprising not only because this large-scale circulation pattern had gone unnoticed for so long, but also because all of the most important periodic atmospheric circulation patterns on record have been centered in the tropics.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Science
Reduce the chloride to restore the switch

A drug given to pregnant mice with models of autism prevents autistic behavior in their offspring, a new report shows, and though the drug could not be administered prenatally in humans (there is no way to screen for autism in human fetuses), clinical trials of this drug administered later in development, in young children who have already developed autistic symptoms, are showing progress.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Feb-2014
BioScience
Policymakers and scientists agree on top research questions

A survey of natural resource managers, policymakers and their advisers, and scientists has found that these groups have surprisingly similar ideas about which research questions are most important for increasing the effectiveness of US natural resource management policies. The question seen as most important was about the quantity and quality of surface and groundwater needed to sustain the US human population and ecosystem resilience.


This work was supported in part by Kresge Foundation grant no. 239855 to the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Contact: Timothy M. Beardsley
tbeardsley@aibs.org
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 6-Feb-2014
Science Translational Medicine
A 'feeling' prosthetic hand

Scientists have created a prosthetic hand that helped an amputee who had not experienced the sensation of touch for ten years to feel differences in the shape and stiffness of objects again; for example, differences in shape and stiffness between a mandarin orange and a baseball.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
JAMA
Pre-term infants with severe retinopathy more likely to have non-visual disabilities at age 5

In a group of very low-birth-weight infants, severe retinopathy of prematurity was associated with nonvisual disabilities at age 5 years, according to a study in the February 5 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Alison Fraser
FraserA1@email.chop.edu
267-426-6054
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
JAMA
Pattern of higher blood pressure in early adulthood helps predict risk of atherosclerosis in middle-age

In an analysis of blood pressure patterns over a 25-year span from young adulthood to middle age, individuals who exhibited elevated and increasing blood pressure levels throughout this time period had greater odds of having higher measures of coronary artery calcification (a measure of coronary artery atherosclerosis), according to a study in the February 5 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Norrina B. Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H.
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Using fMRI data from 108 healthy individuals performing a naturalistic risk-taking task, researchers successfully predicted whether individuals would choose risky or safe options on subsequent trials.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Modeling impacts of climate change on malaria risk

A study comparing modeled future global malaria impacts finds that tropical highland regions of Africa, Asia, and South America may experience heightened climate-change-related malaria risk. The extent of malaria transmission depends on some climatic factors, which influence both the distribution of malaria-carrying mosquitoes and the length of the season in which the mosquitoes are active.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Potential long-term benefits of breast milk antibodies

Failure to receive a type of breast milk-derived antibody might be linked to reduced protection against intestinal inflammation in adulthood, according to a preliminary study in mice. Researchers have previously found that a class of breast milk-derived antibodies called secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) can influence the composition of gut microbes in suckling infants, conferring immune protection early in life.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bone-like synthetic material with high strength-to-weight ratio

By mimicking the properties that make bones both strong and light, researchers have engineered a class of synthetic materials with high strength-to-weight ratios, according to a study. Although the quest to create low-density, high-strength synthetic materials has helped optimize classical materials like aluminum alloys and composites, the lightest solid materials have densities in the range of 1,000 kilograms per cubic meter, similar to liquid water.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gypsies' genes reveal traces of convergent evolution

Researchers have identified immune system genes in Europeans and Gypsies that likely underwent convergent evolution during Europe's deadly epidemics. Immune system genes evolve under the influence of infectious diseases, but few studies have attempted genome-wide assessments of infection-driven evolution.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 226-250 out of 614 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]