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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 646 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
Science
Before farming, a wheat trade in Britain

DNA isolated from an underwater archaeological site off the coast of England suggests that wheat had made its way to the region about 2,000 years before modern humans began farming it there. This finding implies that hunter-gatherers traded with farmers for the cereal grain long before agriculture took hold in the region.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
BioScience
Broader impacts in NSF’s Division of Environmental Biology leave hope for improvement

The National Science Foundation’s Broader Impacts Criterion was envisioned as a way for grant proposals to be judged not only on their intellectual merit but also on the ability of the proposed research to produce wider societal benefits. A review of proposals in the Division of Environmental Biology reveals that, even with the implementation of this criterion, some broader impacts activities have been underreported, and reviewers have tended to pay less attention to them than they have to intellectual-merit-related activities.

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
703-517-1362
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Harmful bugs in Malawian children drive malnutrition

Researchers identify disease-causing bacteria in the gut of malnourished Malawian infants, shedding light on how diet, the gut microbiota, and the host immune system interact to produce severe childhood malnutrition. The human intestine is home to some 100 trillion microbes that help digest food and produce essential vitamins.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
A novel FES control system for restoring motor function of post-stroke hemiplegic patients

Zonghao Huang at Institute of RF- & OE-ICs, Southeast University, China and his colleagues developed a self-administered, multi-movement, force-modulation functional electrical stimulation (FES) prototype system for hemiplegia based on surface electromyography and a support vector machine model.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Neurotrophins and their receptors in satellite glial cells following nerve injury

Peripheral neuropathy is a condition where damage resulting from mechanical or pathological mechanisms is inflicted on nerves within the peripheral nervous system (PNS).

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
mTORC1 as an inducer of neurotrophic factors in dopaminergic neurons

Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTOR) kinase exists in two complexes, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2, which play central roles in the integration of cell growth in response to environmental conditions, including growth factors, amino acids, energy substrates, and oxygen.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Glaucoma: Regeneration or prevention? The answer might lie in the pathogenesis

This article summarizes some salient features of the normal eye structure that have relevance in the light of a new hypothesis concerning the pathogenesis of glaucoma.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
JAMA
Gene variant associated with increased risk and severity of nerve disorder linked to widely-prescribed cancer drug

Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had a certain gene variant experienced a higher incidence and severity of peripheral neuropathy, after receiving treatment with the cancer drug vincristine, according to a study in the February 24 issue of JAMA.

Contact: William E. Evans
media@stjude.org
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
JAMA
Taking NSAIDs with anti-clotting medications following heart attack associated with increased risk of bleeding, cardiovascular events

Among patients receiving antithrombotic therapy (to prevent the formation of blood clots) after a heart attack, the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with an increased risk of bleeding and events such as heart attack, stroke or cardiovascular death, even after short-term treatment, according to a study in the February 24 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Anne-Marie Schjerning Olsen
aols0073@geh.regionh.dk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Following interruption of antiretroviral therapy in 12 people with HIV, the virus that rebounded from multiple lymphoid tissues exhibited genetic diversity pointing to multiple anatomic and cellular reservoirs harboring latent HIV infection, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Microbes in the Challenger Deep

Microbial communities in the deepest parts of the ocean, termed the hadal zone, may be distinct in structure and function from overlying abyssal communities, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Maternal sounds and prenatal brain plasticity

A study of premature infants exposed to maternal womb sounds provides insights into the development and plasticity of the auditory cortex.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Asian climate events and European plague

A study finds that European plague outbreaks during the pandemic that stretched from the 14th century to the 19th century may have been due to intermittent climate-driven reintroduction of plague strains from Asia rather than persistent European rodent reservoirs.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Blood-based tumor detection

A tumor-specific minicircle reporter can generate a potential blood-based biomarker to enable early tumor detection, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Science
Through sons, bluebird mothers shape communities

A 10-year field study of bluebirds shows that a mother’s influence on her sons can play a role in shaping ecological communities. Renée Duckworth and colleagues discovered that female western bluebirds competing for nest cavities with other western bluebirds deposited more androgens in their eggs than non-competing females.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Science
Black hole wind could stunt galaxy’s stars

Researchers peering at the X-ray spectra around the luminous quasar PDS 456 have detected signs of a persistent, almost spherical stream of highly ionized gas emanating from it. This powerful wind may offer proof for a model that connects black hole growth with star formation in an evolving galaxy, say Emanuele Nardini and colleagues.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Science
Support for Cope’s law in the sea

The average size of marine animals has increased by a factor of 150 since the Cambrian Period began about 542 million years ago -- and this trend toward larger bodies is not random, researchers say. These findings lend support to a hypothesis known as Cope’s Rule, which suggests that there is active selection for increasing body size in nature.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Feb-2015
Science
With melanin, sun damage continues long after exposure

Sunbathers can experience cancer-causing DNA damage hours after they’ve left the beach or the tanning bed, a new study finds, and the skin pigment melanin appears to be the culprit in this delayed reaction.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Shaping immune tolerance in the womb for hemophilia therapy

Delivering blood clotting factors into the womb produces immune tolerance in hemophiliac mice, a new study shows. Hemophilia is an inherited disorder in which patients lack one type of clotting factors, proteins that help stop bleeding. A common treatment infusing the missing factor, known as replacement therapy, often fails because the patient’s immune system recognizes the donor’s clotting factor as foreign and develops antibodies against it.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Science
The impact of Chinese aquaculture on global fish supply

A paper published in the journal Science by an international team of researchers gives the clearest picture to date of the impact of China’s aquaculture industry on wild fisheries around the world. The study also describes ways to reduce the amount of wild fish used in Chinese aquaculture.

The Pew Charitable Trusts Lenfest Ocean Program, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, European Union Seventh Framework Programme on Sustaining Ethical Aquaculture Trade (SEAT), and the David and Lucille Packard Founda

Contact: Ling Cao
caoling@stanford.edu
Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
JAMA
Study shows beneficial effect of electric fans in extreme heat and humidity

Although some public health organizations advise against the use of electric fans in severe heat, a new study published in the February 17 issue of JAMA demonstrated that electric fans prevent heat-related elevations in heart rate and core body temperature.

Contact: Michelle Blowes
michelle.blowes@sydney.edu.au
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
JAMA
For smokers unable to quit abruptly, medication helps With gradual reduction and improves smoking cessation

Among cigarette smokers not willing or able to quit smoking in the next month but willing to reduce with the goal of quitting in the next 3 months, use of the nicotine addiction medication varenicline for 24 weeks compared with placebo produced greater reductions in smoking prior to quitting and increased smoking cessation rates at the end of treatment and at 1 year, according to a study in the February 17 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Bryan Anderson
Anderson.Bryan@mayo.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Modeling influenza transmission

Data assimilation and modeling techniques may provide insights into seasonal and pandemic influenza transmission patterns that improve upon clinical and online surveillance data alone, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A combination of anti-PD-L1 antibodies, which target the Programmed Death 1 ligand expressed on a number of tumor types, and ibrutinib, a chemotherapy drug that targets B-cell cancers, suppressed tumor growth in several mouse models of cancer that normally do not respond to ibrutinib treatment, suggesting that the combination therapy may help treat solid tumors, lymphoma, and other blood cancers, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bat echolocation and luna moth tails

Luna moths deflect bat attacks using their long hindwing tails, according to a study. Diversionary tactics, such as false eye spots, are a common predator avoidance mechanism for many prey species, but it is unclear whether species that fall prey to bats engage in the acoustic equivalent of such visual deflection.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 226-250 out of 646 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]