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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 525 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Science
Improved tool allows live imaging of neural spikes

Development of a tool that allows imaging of individual neurons’ membrane voltage dynamics in live animals provides unprecedented insights into the millisecond-by-millisecond actions of neurons.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Science
Parasitic worms affect human reproduction

Roundworm infection can increase the reproduction rate in Amazonian women, while hookworm infection can decrease it, a new study finds.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Science
How fish minimize their visibility to predators in open waters

The open ocean leaves few places for fish the hide from predators, but some species have evolved camouflage abilities that are optimized along angles that predators most often use to detect or attack prey, a new study finds.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Science
Some mollusks equip their armor with eyes

The armored shells of some marine mollusks have evolved to satisfy two conflicting design requirements, protection and sight, a new study shows.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
The common pigeon: Not just a bird brain, but a brainy bird

If pigeons went to medical school and specialized in pathology or radiology, they’d be pretty good at distinguishing digitized microscope slides and mammograms of normal vs. cancerous breast tissue, a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis and The University of Iowa has found.

Contact: Carole Gan
cfgan@ucdavis.edu
916-734-9047
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Vocal cord tissue implant could help treat voice disorders

Researchers have recreated human vocal cord tissue in a dish that was able to produce sound when transplanted into intact voice boxes from animals.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Nondrug interventions improve quality of life for Chinese cancer patients

A meta-analysis of dozens of studies of traditional Chinese medicine and other nonpharmacological interventions meant to improve patients’ quality of life affirms that these approaches, on the whole, help alleviate depression, fatigue, pain, anxiety, insomnia and gastrointestinal problems in Chinese cancer patients.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Nano Research
Novel fabrication of copper nanowire/cuprous oxidebased semiconductor-liquid junction solar cells

A copper nanowires/cuprous oxide based semiconductor-liquid junction solar cell has been assembled with greatly enhanced efficiency. The copper nanowires act as transparent electrode as well as parts of Cu NWs/Cu2O coaxial structures, which remarkably benefit the charge separation.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Science Signaling
How the Hepatitis C virus thwarts the immune system

A new study uncovers a hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein’s role in helping the virus evade the immune system to chronically infect the body.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
JAMA
Early administration of azithromycin for children with recurrent, severe lower respiratory tract illness may reduce severity of illness

Among young children with histories of recurrent severe lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI), the use of azithromycin early during an apparent RTI compared with placebo significantly reduced the risk of experiencing progression to severe LRTI, according to a study in the Nov. 17 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Judy Martin
Martinju@wustl.edu
314-286-0105
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
JAMA
Study compares risk of anaphylaxis among marketed iv iron products

Cunlin Wang, M.D., Ph.D., of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Md., and colleagues studied recipients of intravenous (IV) iron (n = 688,183) enrolled in the fee-for-service Medicare program from January 2003 to December 2013. The study appears in the Nov. 17 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Lyndsay Meyer
lyndsay.meyer@fda.hhs.gov
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Science Bulletin
Efficacy of insect-resistance transgene in F5-F7 generations of rice crop-weed hybrid progeny

Transgene flow from rice to wild relatives and its environmental impact aroused worldwide concerns. Fitness-based biosafety assessment is important for transgenic rice commercialization. A field experiment involving advanced-generations of F5-F7 rice crop-weed hybrid lineages containing Bt/CpTI transgenes indicated their efficient insect-resistance and increased fitness under natural insect pressure, but no fitness benefit under low insect pressure. This finding suggests that data from early-generation are sufficient for biosafety assessment when ambient insect pressure is considered.

973 program of the Ministry of Science and Technology (No. 2011CB100401);Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31330014, 31271683);National Program of Development of Transgenic New Species of China (No. 2013ZX08011-006)

Contact: LU Bao-Rong
brlu@fudan.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
New advanced computing systems

Scientists at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) are studying how to improve the development of advanced computing systems to create faster software under the auspices of RePhrase, a new research project from the European Union Horizon 2020 program. These new techniques will make it possible to improve applications such as industrial manufacturing processes and railway traffic monitoring, as well as the diagnosis of mental illnesses.

Contact: Francisco Javier Alonso
medios@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Waterloo leading Canada-China co-operation on water management

The Government of Canada and People’s Republic of China named the Water Institute at the University of Waterloo as the lead contact on a new co-operation agreement for water management. The two countries will collaborate on a number of projects aimed at improving management of this vital resource as China’s rapid economic development has dramatically increased the likelihood of water shortages in that country.

Contact: Professor Juewen Liu
liujw@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4567 x38919
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of sediment in a High Sierra catchment in California finds that cold, steep, high-elevation slopes produce coarser sediment than low, gentle slopes, suggesting that variations in climate, topography, and weathering rates may shape the evolution of mountain landscapes by influencing sediment size.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Predicting autism outcomes

Connectivity among brain regions may account for variability in autism outcomes not explained by age or behavioral measures, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How pumpkins, gourds, and squash avoided extinction

The wild precursors of pumpkins, gourds, and squash might have gone extinct if not for human domestication, a study suggests.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancient hominin DNA sequences

Researchers report DNA sequences of two Denisovan hominin specimens.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Circadian clock misalignment and consequences

Altering the feeding schedule of mice can shift some circadian events but not others, leading to potential homeostatic and metabolic imbalance, according to a pair of studies.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Revealing the habitat of a ubiquitous fossil

Recent work to reconstruct the habitat of the iconic spiral-shelled ammonite might help reconstruct ancient climate, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Haramiyid fossils illuminate early mammal evolution

Reanalysis of the type fossil specimen of a forerunner of early mammals sheds fresh light on the evolutionary timeline of mammalian diversification, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Nov-2015
Tobacco Control
Studies show China continues to lag in effective tobacco control

Efforts over the past seven years to reduce tobacco use in China have been strikingly ineffective and leave tobacco use a top threat to the health and economic well-being of the world’s largest country, according to research findings by the University of Waterloo’s International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC Project).

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
226-929-7627
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 14-Nov-2015
Scientific Reports
The sun is brightening -- but not in China

Haze due to weak winds and air pollution is reducing surface solar radiation in China, which has major consequences for the climate, the environment and the economy. These are the findings of a research report now being published in Scientific Reports. An international team of researchers including those from the University of Gothenburg is behind the study.

Contact: Deliang Chen
deliang@gvc.gu.se
46-031-786-4813
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 13-Nov-2015
Science
Mass extinctions don’t favor large vertebrates

A new study finds that, similar to the mass extinction that’s underway now, the end-Devonian extinction resulted in the loss of most large bodied vertebrates. The results confirm the Lilliput effect, where a temporary size reduction in species occurs after mass extinction, which is supported by a few observations but remains disputed.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Nov-2015
Science
Fossils tell a different ancestral story of North American mammoths

A detailed analysis of mammoth teeth suggests that a much more evolved species of mammoth first migrated from Asia into North America than previously thought.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 226-250 out of 525 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]