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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 603 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
UC3M participates in a new simulator that provides training in cybersecurity

Researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad de Málaga (UMA) have collaborated with the consulting and technology company Indra on the development of a new advanced simulator of training in cybersecurity, a system that teaches users how to carry out computer forensics, prevent cyber attacks and learn techniques of cyber defense.

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Science
The avian tree of life

An international effort to sequence the genomes of 45 avian species has yielded the most reliable tree of life for birds to date. This new avian family tree helps to clarify how modern birds—the most species-rich class of four-limbed vertebrates on the planet—emerged rapidly from a mass extinction event that wiped out all of the dinosaurs approximately 66 million years ago.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Science
Factors behind new malaria drug resistance

Two teams of researchers in this issue report on the molecular mechanisms behind emerging resistance to the malaria drug artemisinin. One team, led by Judith Straimer, confirms that “propeller mutations” in the K13 gene of plasmodium malaria are responsible for resistance.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Science
Twenty-minute talk can shift attitudes on same-sex marriage

Voters who spoke about same sex-marriage with gay door-to-door canvassers increased their support for the marriages after just a 20-minute conversation, according to a new experiment by Michael LaCour and Donald Green. This effect persisted up to nine months later, with strong evidence that the change in attitude even spread to other members of the voters’ households.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Science
Comet’s water composition could hint at oceans’ origin

Direct measurements of the deuterium-hydrogen ratio in water from the Jupiter Family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko could clarify the question of where the Earth got its water, according to a new report from Kathrin Altwegg and colleagues.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
GigaScience
March of the penguin genomes

Two penguin genomes have been sequenced and analyzed for the first time in the open access, open data journal GigaScience. Timely for the holiday season, the study reveals insights into how these birds have been able to adapt to the cold and hostile Antarctic environment.

Contact: Joel Winston
joel.winston@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2081
BioMed Central

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Stem cells in eye may prevent common cause of blindness

Treating patients with their own stem cells – found on the surface of the human eye – could potentially be used to prevent scarring of the cornea, a common cause of blindness worldwide. The stem cell technique developed by Sayan Basu and colleagues could reduce the need for corneal transplants among patients with corneal scarring, where the transparent, collagen-based structure that makes up the cornea becomes cloudy and distorts the light that enters the eye.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology Annual Meeting
Early identification of modifiable risk factors for cognitive decline

Phoenix, AZ (December 11th, 2014) - Signs of cognitive decline related to aging populations, and even the severe cognitive losses seen in Alzheimer's disease and neurodegenerative disorders, may emerge many years earlier, according to a report presented today at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology annual meeting in Phoenix (Arizona).

Contact: Beth Miller
bmiller@acnp.org
615-324-2378
American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
Nanoscale resistors for quantum devices

Researchers from the London Centre for Nanotechnology have made new compact, high-value resistors for nanoscale quantum circuits. The resistors could speed the development of quantum devices for computing and fundamental physics research.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
JAMA
Resident duty hour reforms do not appear to have had significant effect on patient outcomes or on resident board examination scores

An examination of the effect of resident duty hour reforms in 2011 finds no significant change in mortality or readmission rates for hospitalized patients or outcomes for general surgery patients, according to two studies in the December 10 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on medical education.

Contact: Anna Duerr
anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Science and Technology Review
A trend toward multidisciplinary and individualized treatment in cancer therapy

In recent years, the incidence and mortality of cancer has been increasing, and malignancy has become a common disease threatening human health, therefore cancer prophylaxis and treatment is increasingly important in medical practice. Currently, clinical oncology is in a reforming period. Evidence-based medicine, standardized and individualized treatment has become a well recognized trend in the medical profession. Therefore, cancer prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment is faced with major challenges, as well as important opportunity.

Contact: Tiantian
tiantian@cast.org.cn
Science and Technology Review

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Modeling of vegetation growth and biomass burning trends in the Patagonian border zone between forest and grassland ecosystems reveals that fire regimes have been influenced primarily by patterns of vegetation growth rather than by climate conditions or anthropogenic impacts during the last 18,000 years, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Evolutionary history of monkeys and great apes

A 12 million-year-old partial hipbone from a long extinct primate provides fresh insight into modern monkey and great ape evolution, according to a study. Living great apes and humans share an upright, or orthograde, body plan, characterized by a broad torso and a short, stiff lower back, features long assumed to be present in a common ancestor.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Patterns of text reuse in scientific articles

A study of text reuse in 757,000 scientific articles published over a 20-year timeframe finds that the greater the amount of reused text in an article, the lower its influence as measured by its subsequent citations. Daniel Citron and Paul Ginsparg conducted a systematic pairwise comparison of the full-text content of all articles deposited to arXiv.org—a repository of articles in physics, mathematics, computer science, and some related fields—from 1991-2012, to establish a baseline for currently accepted practice.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Near-field communication with chemical gas sensors

Near-field communication (NFC) between chemical sensor tags and NFC-enabled smartphones may lead to portable and inexpensive monitoring of chemicals and gases, according to a study. Portable chemical sensors and gas analyzers find use in a wide range of applications critical to human health and safety.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Methane emissions from abandoned oil, gas wells

Abandoned oil and gas wells may release a significant quantity of the potent greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, a study suggests. According to previous studies, methane emissions from approximately 3 million abandoned oil and gas wells across the country potentially represent the second largest contributor to total United States methane emissions not accounted for in Environmental Protection Agency estimates.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Simulating the emergence of life’s building blocks

Researchers have simulated events thought to have produced the building blocks of the genetic code. According to a theory, life on Earth originated some 4-3.85 billion years ago, when a barrage of extraterrestrial impacts during the Late Heavy Bombardment triggered formamide molecules to break down into the nucleobases that make up DNA and RNA.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hippocampus storage capacity and memory retrieval

A brain region called the hippocampus may be capable of storing and accurately retrieving a large number of similar experiences through the activation of different combinations of neurons, a study finds. The hippocampus is crucial for storing and retrieving memories of places and events. However, evidence for high-capacity storage in this brain region has been lacking.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Avian flight may depend on visual cues

Flying birds rely on movements in the surrounding environment to control their position in space, a study finds. To explore the role of sensory cues in controlling hovering flight, Benjamin Goller and Douglas L. Altshuler created a virtual reality environment where visual patterns could be displayed to a flying hummingbird.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Health effects of male bonding in macaques

A study suggests that social bonding between male macaques may buffer the adverse health effects of day-to-day stress, a phenomenon previously described only in females and pair-living animals.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
3D modeling of footprint formation

Sub-surface foot movements of a bird walking through sediment, used to simulate footprint formation, may assist in the interpretation of fossilized dinosaur tracks, according to a study. Complex deformation of sediment at various depths during footprint formation complicates fossilized track interpretation.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Designing smarter cities to promote healthier people

A pioneering programme to promote health in cities through better urban design and policies will be debuted by a consortium of world experts in health, environmental, behavioural and social sciences at an international meeting in China Tuesday Dec. 9.

Contact: Anthony Capon, MD
tony.capon@unu.edu
60-019-387-1498
United Nations University

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
The accurate elastodynamic equations for inhomogeneous media

A recent study found out that the gradient of pre-stresses plays an important role in the accurate elastodynamic equations for inhomogeneous media. Thus, it shades a light on the seismology, the NDT of composites, the elastic metamaterials, etc., which are related with the propagation of low frequency elastic waves in inhomogeneous media. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy, 2014, No. 12.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272168).

Contact: XIANG Zhihai
xiangzhihai@tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
New technique allows low-cost creation of 3-D nanostructures

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new lithography technique that uses nanoscale spheres to create three-dimensional (3-D) structures with biomedical, electronic and photonic applications. The new technique is significantly less expensive than conventional methods and does not rely on stacking two-dimensional (2-D) patterns to create 3-D structures.

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
Science
Research on cell size earns top prize for young scientists

For his novel studies into how mammalian cell size is influenced by its environment, Liron Bar-Peled has been named the 2014 Grand Prize winner of the Science & SciLifeLab Prize for Young Scientists.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 226-250 out of 603 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]