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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 535 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Self-organization of fairy circles

Researchers report the discovery of fairy circles in the western Australian outback that are nearly identical to those found in southwestern Africa.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bonobos’ response to emotions

Bonobos share with other primates a bias toward emotional images but are mainly drawn to scenes depicting positive behaviors, a study finds.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Imaging in low-light conditions

Researchers report an imaging device inspired by nature that can help visualize spatial features and boundaries of objects under low-luminance conditions.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tyrannosaur discovery illuminates dinosaur evolution

A primitive cousin of Tyrannosaurus rex may help explain how second-tier predators from the Early Cretaceous evolved into the behemoths that ruled the Age of Dinosaurs.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Overweight reporting in New York City schools

Body mass index (BMI) reports given by schools to students and their parents may not be an effective tool for reducing obesity, a study suggests.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Assessing emergence of SARS-like epidemic viruses

A study reports methods to assess the likelihood of emergence and epidemic potential of SARS-like zoonotic viruses. The precise likelihood of emergence of zoonotic coronaviruses with epidemic potential similar to Severe Acute Respiratory Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) remains unclear.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
JAMA
Study examines link between genetically elevated maternal BMI and higher offspring birth weight

In a study that included more than 30,000 women, genetically elevated maternal body mass index (BMI) and blood glucose levels were potentially causally associated with higher offspring birth weight, while genetically elevated maternal systolic blood pressure was potentially causally related to lower birth weight, according to a study appearing in the March 15 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Rachel M. Freathy
r.freathy@ex.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
JAMA
Substantial proportion of US measles cases intentionally unvaccinated

An analysis of numerous studies and reports finds that unvaccinated or undervaccinated U.S. individuals comprised substantial proportions of cases in measles and some pertussis outbreaks, and vaccine refusal was associated with an increased risk for measles and pertussis among people who refuse vaccines and those that are fully vaccinated, according to a study appearing in the March 15 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@med.umich.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 14-Mar-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Distributions of tetraether lipids in the Third Pole Region

Several organic paleothermometers based on tetraether lipids, called GDGTs have been introduced since the beginning of the 21st century. However, field investigations of GDGTs on Tibetan Plateau are still limited and further survey is urgently required. Hence, surface sediments of 27 lakes on the Plateau were investigated and factors that influenced GDGT distribution were also analyzed. Finally, quantitative relationships between GDGTs-proxies and temperature were established which provide the basis for paleoclimatic reconstruction in this region.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41072120,41321061)

Contact: WANG mingda
mdwang@itpcas.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 14-Mar-2016
ACS Nano
PolyU develops novel nano biosensor for rapid detection of flu virus

The Department of Applied Physics (AP) and Interdisciplinary Division of Biomedical Engineering (BME) of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) have jointly developed a novel nano biosensor for rapid detection of flu and other viruses.

Innovation and Technology Fund

Contact: Janice Chan
janice.hw.chan@polyu.edu.hk
852-276-65104
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Public Release: 14-Mar-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Chinese scientists realize quantum simulation of the Unruh effect

The Unruh effect is one of the most fundamental manifestations of the fact that the particle content of a field theory is observer dependent. However, there has been so far no experimental verification of this effect. Now Chinese scientists report an experimental simulation of the Unruh effect with a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator, which may provide a promising way to explore the quantum physics of accelerated systems.

The National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB921800 and 2014CB848700);The National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11227901, 91021005, 11375167, 11374308, 11104262 and 11275183)

Contact: CHEN Hongwei
hwchen@hmfl.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 12-Mar-2016
Social networks used in the assessment of damage caused by natural disasters

An international scientific study, involving Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), has carried research into the use of social networks such as Twitter, as tools for monitoring, assessing and even predicting levels of economic damage caused by natural disasters.

Contact: Esteban Moro Egido
emoro@math.uc3m.es
34-916-248-727
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 11-Mar-2016
Harnessing new technologies and policies for better ocean observation

Automatic ship identification systems (AIS) have much potential to provide useful marine data and inform international marine policies, but inconsistent use of this technology, as well as falsification of data by users, must be addressed, Douglas McCauley et al. emphasize in this Policy Forum.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Mar-2016
Timing the treatment of cancer cells

Timing may not be everything, but it could be important in understanding why an anticancer treatment like radiation produces different results against cancer cells, according to a new study by Sheng-hong Chen and colleagues.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Mar-2016
Mystery surrounding methane plateau explained

The concentration of atmospheric methane has been steadily increasing since the dawn of the industrial age -- except for a mysterious plateau between 1999 and 2006.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Mar-2016
The plastic-eating bacteria breakdown

Researchers have identified a species of bacteria that uses just two enzymes to breakdown plastic. Poly(ethylene terephthalate), or PET, is a type of polymer used in plastic that is highly resistant to biodegradation.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
BioScience
Overfishing devastates spawning aggregations

Because they are easier to catch and potentially more threatened by nonlethal effects, fish that form spawning aggregations are at particular risk when those aggregations are heavily fished. To address the threat, precautionary management principles that limit or prohibit fishing on spawning aggregations must be implemented.

David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: James M Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
Compounds restore antibiotics’ efficacy against MRSA

Antibiotics rendered useless by the notorious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) may get a second life, thanks to compounds that can restore the bug’s susceptibility to antibiotics, according to a new study in mice.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
Science Bulletin
Ferrite boosting photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

Photocatalytic hydrogen generation via water splitting has become a hot spot in the field of energy and materials. In a recent article published in Science Bulletin, Prof. Shaohua Shen’s research group described an efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production system designed basing on promoting both of the charge carrier separation and surface catalytic redox reaction processes in g-C3N4.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (51323011 and 51236007),etc.

Contact: Shaohua Shen
shshen_xjtu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
JAMA
Concussion assessment tool may help predict risk of persistent postconcussion symptoms among children

A clinical risk score developed among children presenting to an emergency department with a concussion was significantly better than physician judgment in predicting future persistent postconcussion symptoms, according to a study appearing in the March 8, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Adrienne Vienneau
avienneau@cheo.on.ca
613-737-7600
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
JAMA
Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy associated with small increased risk of cardiomyopathy

Women with a history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy have a small but statistically significant increased risk of cardiomyopathy more than 5 months after delivery, according to a study appearing in the March 8, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Ida Behrens
idbe@ssi.dk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 9-Mar-2016
JAMA
Study findings do not support use of vitamin D to reduce pain, cartilage loss from knee osteoarthritis

Vitamin D supplementation for individuals with knee osteoarthritis and low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels did not reduce knee pain or slow cartilage loss, according to a study appearing in the March 8, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Changhai Ding
changhai.ding@utas.edu.au
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that when engineering E. coli to synthesize oxygenated taxane, a precursor of the cancer drug Taxol, optimization of the expression level of the enzyme cytochrome P450, interactions between P450 and its reductase partner, and N-terminal modifications of P450 together resulted in a five-fold increase in oxygenated taxane production over previous efforts.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mite-virus mutualism in honeybee colony loss

A study suggests that the mutualistic association between a parasitic mite and the virus it transmits is crucial to unraveling the dynamics of honeybee colony losses.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Predicting tropical cyclone activity in the Caribbean

Historical accounts of shipwrecks may help researchers understand how fluctuations in solar radiation affect tropical cyclone activity in the Caribbean, according to a study.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 226-250 out of 535 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]