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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 539 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 19-Feb-2016
Science
Erratum to 2015 Science paper on ancient Ethiopian genome

Science is publishing an Erratum to the Report “Ancient Ethiopian genome reveals extensive Eurasian admixture throughout the African continent” published online on Oct. 8, 2015. The results of this study were affected by a bioinformatics error on the part of the authors.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Feb-2016
Science
Harnessing gut fungi to break down biomass

Researchers have recorded a library of enzymes secreted by fungi that breakdown plant biomass, and mapped out how these enzymes synergistically function. The results could help simplify and lower the costs of biofuel production.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Feb-2016
Science
Antibodies from an Ebola survivor reveal a potential new vaccine target

Researchers have harvested a robust collection of antibodies from a survivor of the recent Ebola outbreak, and one subset of antibodies were found to be particularly potent for neutralizing the virus in mice. These antibodies, which target the stalk of a particular protein in the virus’s membrane, could lead to new therapies to fight Ebola.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Feb-2016
Science
Gut microbes help sustain body growth despite malnutrition

Two new studies demonstrate how malnutrition can affect the gut microbiota, and identify certain species of microbes that can offset the negative effects of malnutrition. These findings could hold important implications for millions of children worldwide who experience malnutrition, which can result in stunted growth, among other adverse effects.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Feb-2016
Cell Metabolism
Stressed mouse dads give their offspring high blood sugar

Mouse fathers under psychological stress were more likely to have offspring with high blood sugar compared to their unstressed counterparts. In a study appearing Feb. 18, 2016 in Cell Metabolism, researchers link this difference to an epigenetic change in the stressed dad’s sperm -- a change that they could prevent by blocking the father’s stress hormones. The study adds to growing evidence that a male’s life experience can be passed down through more than his genetic code alone.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
The next detectors for gravitational wave astronomy

SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy 2015(12)issue published a special topic on "the Next Detectors for Gravitational Wave Astronomy".

the US National Science Foundation;the National Natural Science Foundation of China;etc.

Contact: Guo Yuan-Yuan
guoyuanyuan@scichina.org
Science China Press

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Could a noncoding RNA be a new drug target for heart disease?

A new study uncovers a type of noncoding RNA that drives heart failure in mice as a potential therapeutic target for heart disease. Only 1.5% of the human genome encodes proteins, while the rest remains either untranscribed or converted into noncoding RNAs, molecules that do not code for proteins.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Radiogenic beryllium concentrations and compound-specific radiocarbon ages of sediment cores from the Ross Sea in Antarctica indicate that the most recent and widespread collapse of the Ross Ice Shelf occurred between 5,000 and 1,500 years ago, and modeling results combined with ice core oxygen isotope measurements suggest that oceanic and atmospheric warming caused the collapse, according to a study.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Comparing human and computer vision

Despite recent improvements, computational models of vision have many limitations, and a study suggests that the human brain recognizes objects using visual features and learning processes that current models do not deploy.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Infants' understanding of social dominance rules

Infants as young as 6 months of age can make inferences about social dominance based on the size of social groups, a study suggests. Anthea Pun and colleagues tested whether infants, ages 6-12 months, can use numerical group size to assess social dominance.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Time of day and standardized test scores

A study suggests a link between student performance on standardized tests and the time of day when such tests are administered. Despite efforts to develop standardized tests that objectively measure student achievement, previous studies have suggested potential sources of bias in standardized tests.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Invisible metallic mesh

Researchers have designed a synthetic material that neither reflects nor refracts light at 10.4 GHz, rendering the material invisible in a narrow band of the microwave spectrum. A solid material that neither reflects nor refracts light would be invisible.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Host immunity, climate warming, and parasite infections

Climate warming is predicted to increase the risk and transmission of parasite infections, and a study reports that the effect of warming on parasite infections might be influenced by variations in host immunity to parasites. Isabella M. Cattadori and colleagues explored the disease dynamics of two soil-transmitted gastrointestinal helminths of rabbits, Trichostrongylus retortaeformis and Graphidum strigosum, sampled monthly between 1977 and 2002 in Scotland.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Regulations that improve fishing safety

Regulations that allow fishermen to receive a specific share of the allowable catch might help improve the safety of commercial fishing, a study finds. Commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous occupations in the United States.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
JAMA
Type of lung abnormalities associated with increased risk of death

The presence of interstitial lung abnormalities are associated with a greater risk of all-cause mortality, according to a study in the Feb. 16, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Elaine St. Peter
estpeter@partners.org
617-525-6375
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
JAMA
Study compares tests to detect acute HIV infection

In a study appearing in the Feb. 16, 2016 issue of JAMA, Philip J. Peters, M.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and colleagues evaluated the performance of an HIV antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combination assay to detect acute HIV infection (early infection) compared with pooled HIV RNA testing, the reference standard. The study included 86,836 participants in a high-prevalence population from 7 sexually transmitted infection clinics and 5 community-based programs in New York, California, and North Carolina.

Contact: NCHHSTP Media Team
NCHHSTPMediaTeam@cdc.gov
404-639-8895
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Feb-2016
JAMA
Salt and sodium intake remains high in China

Yongning Wu, Ph.D., of the China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing, China, and colleagues compared salt and sodium consumption in China in 2000 with 2009-2012. The study appears in the Feb. 16, 2016issue of JAMA.

Contact: Yongning Wu
wuyongning@cfsa.net.cn
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Science Bulletin
Scalable production of self-supported composites by electrospinning

A flexible WS2/carbon nanofiber (CNF) hybrid composition has been prepared by using a versatile electrospinning method; the resulting WS2/CNF hybrid composition contains few-/single-layered WS2 nanoplates that are uniformly embedded in CNFs. When used as the active anode material for Li-ion batteries, these nanofibers exhibit good electrochemical performance (cover articles in Science Bulletin, 2016, 3: 227-235).

the National Basic Research Program of China (2015CB932600), the National Nature Science Foundation of China (21571073 and 51302099),etc.

Contact: Zhai Tianyou
zhaity@hust.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 12-Feb-2016
Science
Abnormal combos of peptides may contribute to diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) may be linked to insulin-related peptides that mistakenly bond to other peptides within the pancreas and spleen, a new study suggests.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2016
Science
Teachers’ knowledge and values can hinder climate education

Most U.S. science teachers include climate science in their courses, yet political ideology and insufficient grasp of the science may be hindering the quality of their teaching, authors of this Education Forum say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2016
Science
Land reservoirs helped offset sea level rise, study says

Recent increases in the storage of excess groundwater may be helping to offset sea level rise by as much as 15%, a new study finds.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2016
Science
Neandertal-derived DNA may influence depression and more in modern humans

Researchers have found correlations between Neanderthal-derived genes and disease states in modern humans -- including those influencing the skin, the immune system, depression, addiction, and metabolism.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug’s toxicity

In one of the first efforts to date to apply nanotechnology to targeted cancer therapeutics, researchers have created a nanoparticle formulation of a cancer drug that is both effective and nontoxic -- qualities harder to achieve with the free drug.

Contact: Meagan Phelan
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
JAMA
Task-oriented rehab program does not result in greater recovery from stroke

The use of a structured, task-oriented rehabilitation program, compared with usual rehabilitation, did not result in better motor function or recovery after 12 months for patients with moderate upper extremity impairment following a stroke, according to a study in the Feb. 9, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Zen Vuong
zvuong@usc.edu
213-740-5277
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
JAMA
Study compares effectiveness of behavioral interventions to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing

Among primary care practices, the use of two socially motivated behavioral interventions -- accountable justification and peer comparison -- resulted in significant reductions in inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections, while an intervention that lacked a social component, suggested alternatives, had no significant effect, according to a study in the Feb. 9, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Emily Gersema
gersema@usc.edu
213-740-0252
The JAMA Network Journals

Showing releases 226-250 out of 539 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]