EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
28-Apr-2015 04:38
Beijing Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Breaking News

Multimedia Gallery

Subscribe/Sponsor

Interviews

Events Calendar

Selected Science Sources in China

MOST

CAS

CAE

CAST

NSFC

CASS

CAAS

CAMS

RSS

EurekAlert!

Text Size Option

Language

English (英文)

Chinese (中文)

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 651 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 ]

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Delaying Alzheimer’s disease progression by improved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors

Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents a world-wide socio-economic burden with no cure and only limited treatment success. Despite tremendous research, the first line treatment are only the FDA-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Science
Mutation underlying severe flu identified

This study of a young French girl and her parents suggests that a recessive mutation that results in the loss of antiviral proteins known as interferons may be responsible for the rare but severe influenza that sometimes strikes children.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Science
Ice shelves thinning at Antarctica’s edges

After analyzing 18 years of satellite data, researchers suggest that the ice shelves around Antarctica have been thinning at accelerated rates for the past two decades, especially near the western edge of the continent. Their findings demonstrate that previous studies, which have generally relied on shorter, five-year satellite records, have not been representative of longer trends -- and it raises concern about how fast the global sea level could rise as climate continues to warm.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Science
Evaluating child abuse through generations

Amid debate about whether parents abused as youths are more likely to abuse their own children, a new study incorporating the perspectives of multiple generations reveals that part of what people believe to be the intergenerational transmission of abuse may be due to surveillance or detection -- specifically, bias targeted at parents who were abused themselves as children.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Mar-2015
Science
Ebola virus not mutating as fast as feared

A new study suggests that the virus responsible for the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa is not mutating as quickly as earlier reports had suggested. This helps alleviate fears since a faster rate of mutation could have given the virus new properties that helped it spread more efficiently and resist current therapies.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
A UC3M patent can multiply mobile devices’ uploading speed by tenfold

A patent held by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) makes a jacket able to increase by tenfold the speed at which mobile devices can upload content. This is the MIMO HUB patent, which enables its jacket, in which numerous antennas are camouflaged, to connect to any mobile terminal in order to increase its data transfer speed, reduce its energy consumption and improve its reliability.

Contact: fjalonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Multiple facets of poly(ADP-Ribose) polymerase-1 in neurological diseases

The highly conserved abundant nuclear protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is activated by DNA damage. PARP-1 activation is associated in DNA repair, cell death and inflammation.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Death of spinal projecting neurons of the brain following spinal cord injury

New perspective article on the death of spinal projecting neurons of the brain following spinal cord injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Special issue: harnessing the immune system for therapy

This special issue of Science Translational Medicine captures the latest advances in immunotherapy, which harnesses the power of the immune system to treat human disease. A collection of three Perspectives, a Review, and a State of the Art Review tied together by a special Editorial examines the challenges and successes of this rapidly evolving field.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Biological conduit small gap sleeve bridging for peripheral nerve injury

It has shown that the clinical effects of 2-mm small gap sleeve bridging of the biological conduit to repair peripheral nerve injury are better than in the traditional epineurium suture, so it is possible to replace the epineurium suture in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury. However, the regeneration raw of nerve fibers in the biological conduit remains poorly understood.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Green tea polyphenols-pretreated nerve allografts for repair of peripheral nerve defects

Sheng-hu Zhou, Lanzhou General Hospital of Lanzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA, China and his colleagues recently found that sciatic nerve allograft pretreated with 1 mg/mL green tea polyphenols (GTP) at 4℃ was superior to irradiation-pretreated sciatic nerve allograft from the perspectives of functional and structural results in the repair of 1.0 cm-long sciatic nerve defect.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
78% of nerve biopsy findings support clinical diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy

Multiple mononeuropathy (MM) is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy involving two or more nerve trunks. It is a syndrome with many different causes. Previous literature regarding multiple mononeuropathy mainly consists of clinical electrophysiological data, which is not enough for clinical diagnosis of this disease.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
Cutaneous nerve injury after foot and ankle surgery: 6-month sensory nerve recovery

Wen-tao Zhang, Shenzhen Hospital of Peking University, China and his colleagues recently found that the recovery of sensory function in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Child with autism improves with antibiotic; prompts new investigations into autism

John Rodakis, the parent of a child with autism was not looking to launch an international investigation into the microbiome (the collection of microorganisms that live on and in us) and autism, but, as he describes in his newly published article in the scientific journal Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease, when his young son's autism unexpectedly and dramatically improved while taking an antibiotic for strep throat, he began a quest to understand why.

Contact: John Rodakis
media@NofOne.org
972-866-4905
N of One: Autism Research Foundation

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Mutation of a peptide pheromone gene, called M-factor, in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and subsequent matching of the mutated strains with strains containing mutated pheromone receptor proteins resulted in the creation of yeast mating pairs that were reproductively isolated from the wild type population, suggesting that manipulation of the mating pheromone system in yeast may artificially create novel yeast species, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Large mammals hunted by prehistoric humans

Advanced carbon dating techniques have revealed that a prehistoric kill and butchering site attributed to the Clovis People was active approximately 300 years prior to their appearance in North America. Animal remains butchered with stone tools near Wally’s Beach, Alberta, Canada, currently represent evidence that prehistoric humans hunted now-extinct horse and camel species near the end of the last Ice Age.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Carbon monoxide as potential energy source on Mars

Atmospheric carbon monoxide could potentially sustain microbial communities on Mars, a study suggests. Although the search for past or current life on Mars has focused primarily on finding liquid water, researchers have not identified an energy source that could fuel metabolism by microbes living on or near the planet’s surface.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Indigenous fixed nitrogen in martian deposits

A study reports the presence of indigenous fixed nitrogen in martian rocks and sediments. Jennifer Stern and colleagues report that the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover has detected the presence of oxidized nitrogen-bearing compounds in deposits within Mars’s Gale Crater. Nitrogen species were detected in samples from three sites, with total nitrogen concentrations ranging from 20-250 nmol per sample.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Land management and wetlands carbon footprint

The net climate impact of wetlands might depend on whether the areas are natural or managed, according to a study. In the context of climate change, wetlands represent unique ecosystems that both remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and emit methane into it.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Jupiter migration in the early Solar System

Jupiter’s orbital migration in its early history may explain why the structure of the Solar System differs from most extrasolar systems, according to a study. The Solar System, with low-mass inner planets relatively far from the Sun, may be an anomaly compared with most known extrasolar planetary systems, which feature large planets orbiting close to their star.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Banded vegetation patterns

Patterns of vegetation banding on semi-arid hillsides may depend on local climate and vegetation history, according to a study. Vegetation in semi-arid climates often self-organizes into banded patterns on hillslopes with a shorter wavelength on steep slopes than on gentle slopes, seemingly contrary to mathematical models of banded pattern formation.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Evolution and origin of leprosy bacteria

Researchers report the genomic sequence of a second leprosy-causing organism and reveal the origin and evolutionary history of the pathogens. The bacterium Mycobacterium leprae has been long considered the single causative agent of leprosy, but a previous study suggests that a related species, M. lepromatosis, may underlie a rare but severe form of the disease known as diffuse lepromatous leprosy.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Evolution of Maya sedentary life

The transition from groups of mobile foragers to established sedentary communities in Mayan society may have included groups of varying degrees of mobility gathering for public ceremonies, according to a study. Archaeological studies in several regions suggest that sedentism did not necessarily develop simultaneously across all social groups within a region.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
BMC Medicine
Good news for serial cereal eaters

A diet high in whole grains and cereal fibers is associated with a reduced risk of premature death, according to research published in the open access journal BMC Medicine. The results also show cereal fibers to be associated with reduced risk of deaths in varying degrees for the chronic diseases including cancer, heart disease, respiratory disease and diabetes.

Contact: Shane Canning
shane.canning@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2243
BioMed Central

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
JAMA
Pay gap between male and female RNs has not narrowed

An analysis of the trends in salaries of registered nurses (RNs) in the United States from 1988 through 2013 finds that male RNs outearned female RNs across settings, specialties, and positions, with no narrowing of the pay gap over time, according to a study in the March 24/31 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Ulrike Muench, Ph.D., R.N.
Scott.Maier@ucsf.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Showing releases 101-125 out of 651 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 ]