EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
29-Jul-2015 23:53
Beijing Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Breaking News

Multimedia Gallery

Subscribe/Sponsor

Interviews

Events Calendar

Selected Science Sources in China

MOST

CAS

CAE

CAST

NSFC

CASS

CAAS

CAMS

RSS

EurekAlert!

Text Size Option

Language

English (英文)

Chinese (中文)

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 560 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Science
Opening the doors to Iran’s nuclear program

Opening Iran's national uranium enrichment plant to multinational involvement could limit the long-term risks of Iran's nuclear program as restrictions on it expire, according to this Policy Forum.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Science
Wastewater injection rate strongest trigger for induced quakes

A new study aiming to provide a better understanding of how injection wells in the U.S. influence earthquake activity cites wastewater injection rate as a critical factor. In the study, the highest-rate wastewater disposal wells analyzed were nearly twice as likely to be associated with earthquake events compared to their lower-rate counterparts.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Science
Baboons decide where to go together

Researchers have found evidence of shared decision-making among a troop of wild baboons, supporting the conclusion that democracy might be an inherent trait of collective behavior, or decisions that dictate where a particular social group goes and what it does, even in species where strong dominance hierarchies exist.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Science
DNA from illegal ivory points to poaching hotspots in Africa

New genetic tools are helping researchers to trace illegal ivory back to the elephant populations from which it came, and they might help law enforcement crack down on poaching in the future. Elephant poaching is happening at rates that threaten African populations with extinction.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Disabling infection-fighting immune response speeds up wound healing in diabetes

One of the body's tools for fighting off infection in a wound may actually slow down the healing process, according to new research published online in Nature Medicine on June 15, 2015. The researchers showed that they can speed up wound healing in diabetic mice by preventing immune cells called neutrophils from producing structures called NETs, which trap and kill bacteria.

Contact: Barbara Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Chinese Optics Letters
New fiber-based radio frequency dissemination scheme for branching networks

The researchers led by Prof. Lijun Wang, from the Joint institute for Measurement Science (JMI), Tsinghua University, proposed and demonstrated a new fiber-based RF dissemination scheme suitable for a branching network to overcome the main drawback of limited accessing area of conventional fiber-based frequency synchronization schemes.

Contact: Xiaofeng Wang
wxf@siom.ac.cn
Chinese Laser Press

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Vinculin may keep us young at heart

In the hearts of rats, monkeys, and fruit flies, the protein vinculin accumulates with age, helps the heart maintain its function, and extended lifespan in some cases. Gaurav Kaushik and colleagues show that vinculin production in the heart increases with age in monkeys and rats, reinforcing heart muscle and improving the ability of individual heart muscle cells to contract.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Journal of Applied Physics
Communicating with hypersonic vehicles in flight

Researchers propose a potential new way to maintain communication with re-entering spacecraft and other vehicles by matching resonance of the antenna with that of the surrounding hypersonic sheath.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Transmission of climate change impacts in the historical China

Using a food security perspective, the impacts of temperature changes historically transmitted through Chinese social system in cold and warm units were analyzed. There were 23 main transmission pathways extending from grain harvest to famine or peasant uprisings. Within this process, the impact of climate change was stepwise decrease, and famine was most prone to being modulated by human society. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences(In Chinese), 2015, No.6.

Major State Basic Research Development Program of China of Global Change Research (Grant No. 2010CB950103), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41371201), and the Strategic Project of Science and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sc

Contact: SU Yun
suyun@bnu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
International Journal of Epidemiology
Lack of sleep affects long-term health

New research from the University of Copenhagen has found that maintaining a good night’s sleep is important for our future health, partly because of how it affects lifestyle factors. Previous population based studies have not provided sufficient information on the timing of changes in both sleep and lifestyle to tease out cause and effect relations of this highly intertwined relationship.

Contact: Alice Jessie Clark
alcl@sund.ku.dk
456-171-1167
University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Surveys of 5,300 Germans in 1996 and 2006 find that Germans born in the 1920s and 1930s and who were exposed to Nazi anti-Semitic messages as children express stronger anti-Semitic beliefs, on average, than Germans born before or after that time, suggesting the extent and effectiveness of policy intervention efforts to influence beliefs.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Green spaces and cognitive growth in children

A study reports a link between exposure to green spaces at school and cognitive development in primary schoolchildren. Patches of greenery in cities packed with buildings are thought to have a positive effect on cognitive development in children, but few studies have uncovered population-level evidence for such a link.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How moon jellies repair asymmetry

In response to losing limbs, the moon jelly reorganizes remaining body parts to recover its essential symmetry, according to a study. Evolution has endowed animals with the capacity to recover from injuries, ranging from wound healing to regenerating lost body parts.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nature as capital

Continued development of global economic, political, and social systems depends on the world’s natural resources, but many policy decisions currently fail to explicitly incorporate benefits, impacts, and dependencies on natural capital, according to a series of articles in the Nature as Capital PNAS 100th Anniversary Special Feature.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Seasonal vitamin D deficiency and HIV progression

Vitamin D supplementation may help reverse seasonal nutritional deficiency and slow HIV progression in Cape Town, South Africa, according to a study. Because vitamin D is associated with immune system function, deficiencies can affect the outcome of diseases, including infection with HIV.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Environmental fluctuations and dinosaur dominance

Climate and plant community instability may have hampered the success of dinosaurs in tropical latitudes during the Triassic Period, according to a study. Although dinosaurs ecologically dominated high latitudes before the end of the Triassic, they were rare in tropical latitudes, with few species present, for up to 30 million years after their origin.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Perceptual dynamics in binocular rivalry

Hearing music can enhance the visual sensory perception of a musical score, provided that a person can read music and that the music and score are congruent, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Street connectivity and urban sprawl

Urban sprawl in the United States likely peaked around 1994 and then declined as street networks moved away from loop and cul-de-sac designs and toward connected grid designs, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Endemic tuberculosis strains in East Asia

Researchers report that a family of tuberculosis bacteria may have originated in Southeast Asia and expanded in parallel with the expansion of the Han Chinese population.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Analyzing the illegal wildlife trade

Researchers report a quantitative analysis of countries implicated in the illegal international wildlife trade. Current attempts at preventing and controlling the illegal wildlife trade are largely unsuccessful, despite advances in technology and descriptive work.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Greenhouse gas emissions and environmentalism

Environmentalism may have a significant impact on greenhouse gas emissions, according to a study. Previous studies suggest that population and economic affluence are among the main drivers of anthropogenic climate change.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
JAMA
Trial compares antibiotics vs appendectomy for treatment of appendicitis

Among patients with uncomplicated appendicitis, antibiotic treatment did not meet a prespecified level of effectiveness compared with appendectomy, although most patients who received antibiotic therapy did not require an appendectomy, and for those who did, they did not experience significant complications, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Paulina Salminen, M.D.
paulina.salminen@tyks.fi
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
JAMA
Development assistance for health has increased substantially since 1990 for low-income countries

Funding for health in developing countries has increased substantially since 1990, with a focus on HIV/AIDS, maternal health, and newborn and child health, and limited funding for noncommunicable diseases, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Joseph L. Dieleman,Ph.D.
stewartr@uw.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
China Science Bulletin
Herding:instinct or heuristics?

Many previous studies regarded herding as a kind of instinctive behavior. Now researchers in Tsinghua university compare herding behavior in mice under real-fire and simulated-fire conditions,proved that herding is not instinct but a heuristic strategy that corresponds to ecological rationality. During a real fire, if the individual has an implicit memory associated with escape, priority is given to this knowledge instead of the herding heuristic.

Independent research project of Tsinghua University (No. 2010THZ04 )

Contact: LI Hong
lhong@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
Bistatic/multistatic synthetic aperture radar: approaching the new era

Bistatic/multistatic SAR has attracted global attention and made remarkable progress recently. The most important theoretical results including bistatic imaging, interferometry, change detection etc were collected in the special issue of bistatic/multistatic SAR published on SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences, no. 6, 2015.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61120106004, 61427802, 61225005);Chang Jiang Scholars Program (T2012122) ;111 project of China under Grant B14010.

Contact: Tian Wei ming
tianwei6779@163.com
Science China Press

Showing releases 101-125 out of 560 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]