EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
28-Jan-2015 04:57
Beijing Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Breaking News

Multimedia Gallery

Subscribe/Sponsor

Interviews

Events Calendar

Selected Science Sources in China

MOST

CAS

CAE

CAST

NSFC

CASS

CAAS

CAMS

RSS

EurekAlert!

Text Size Option

Language

English (英文)

Chinese (中文)

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 684 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 ]

Public Release: 25-Dec-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
How many atoms can display the thermal expansions of liquid metals?

Predicting the macroscopic properties of materials is an interesting puzzle in the field of materials physics and chemistry. A recent research indicates that the thermal expansion of several kinds of metastable liquid metals can be predicted with only one thousand atoms, which reveals the connection between the microscopic information and the macroscopic property of materials. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy, 2014, No.12.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51474175, 51271150 and 51327901), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents and NPU Foundation for Fundamental Research.

Contact: WANG Haipeng
hpwang@nwpu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 25-Dec-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Curbing ATM signaling rescues brain cells from death in Huntington’s disease models

A study shows that curtailing the effects of the ATM protein may protect against brain cell death in cell and animal models of Huntington’s disease. Huntington’s disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder, in which mutated fragments of the protein Huntingtin clog and damage nerve cells in the brain, impairing movement and cognitive ability.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Dec-2014
China Science Bulletin
Nanostructured Copper Oxide Functionalized Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensor for Hydrogen Cyanide

A research reviewed recent works on the development of copper oxide nanomaterials of different structures and morphologies and the sensing properties and sensing mechanism of CuO functionalized quartz crystal microbalance sensors towards hydrogen cyanide detection. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin (In Chinese), 2014, No.32.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. (21271177);the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. (KGCX2-YW-111-5));National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. (2010CB934103);Technical Institute of P

Contact: HE Junhui
jhhe@mail.ipc.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 24-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Does progesterone neuroprotect TBI by increasing hippocampal Akt phosphorylation?

There is evidence that progesterone increased phosphorylation at the serine 473 via the PI3 kinase pathway, thus enhancing Akt activation and neuroprotection in TBI.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Syringaldehyde protects cerebral ischemia by anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties

Several studies have demonstrated that syringaldehyde is a polyphenolic compound in the flavonoid group that exhibits anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. Aras Adem Bozkurt, Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkey and his team performed a study and hypothesized that syringaldehyde shows neuroprotective effects on ischemic brain cells through its anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Diffuse axonal injury in the brain is related to myelin debris accumulation?

Myelin debris is an important inflammatory mediator. After diffuse axonal injury, accumulation of myelin debris causes chronic inflammatory reaction, leading to further axonal injury and hindering recovery. The precise influence of diffuse axonal injury and the underlying mechanism remain to be disputed.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Inhibition of Sirtuin 2 reduces striatal dopamine depletion with increased neonatal iron intake

Iron is an essential trace metal. It plays an important role in electron transfer, oxygen transport, neurotransmitter synthesis, and myelin production in the central nervous system.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Dec-2014
JAMA
Maternal supplementation with multiple micronutrients, compared with iron-folic acid, does not reduce infant mortality

In Bangladesh, daily maternal supplementation of multiple micronutrients compared to iron-folic acid before and after childbirth did not reduce all-cause infant mortality to age 6 months, but did result in significant reductions in preterm birth and low birth weight, according to a study in the December 24/31 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Keith P. West Jr., Dr.P.H.
Sdesmon1@jhu.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 24-Dec-2014
JAMA
Longer duration, deeper body cooling for newborns with neurological condition does not reduce risk of death

Among full-term newborns with moderate or severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (damage to cells in the central nervous system from inadequate oxygen), receiving deeper or longer duration cooling did not reduce risk of neonatal intensive care unit death, compared to usual care, according to a study in the December 24/31 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Seetha Shankaran, M.D.
pvanhulle@med.wayne.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Reproduce mechanical property of granular materials via numerical triaxial simulation

Mechanical behavior of granular material in landslides is of great significance. Considering non-spherical particle effects, a recent study demonstrates that the numerical triaxial apparatus based on the rolling contact type discrete element method is able to simulate and reproduce the results of real granular materials by triaxial tests in laboratory, which provides an effective way for both failure mechanism analysis and mechanical parameter quantification of granular material in engineering applications. This study has been published in SCIENCE CHINA: Physics Mechanics & Astronomy, 2014 No.12.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11432015 and 10932012).

Contact: Li Jiachun
jcli05@imech.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

According to a study, analysis of carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in carbonate minerals of Martian meteorite ALH 84001 may reveal details of the history of Mars’ atmosphere, and may suggest that the enrichment in carbon-13 isotopes around 4 billion years ago was different from that observed in the Martian atmosphere today.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bird migration and avian influenza spread

The migratory patterns of wild birds influence the spread and periodic reemergence of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 in Asia, according to a study. H5N1 first appeared in 1996 and eventually spread throughout Asia and Europe, causing economic losses in poultry markets and some human deaths.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Heart rate and fear of terrorism

Long-term exposure to threats of terror can induce elevated resting heart rates and result in an increased risk of mortality, according to a study. A long-term, abnormally elevated basal heart rate can increase the likelihood of death from all primary causes, but the physical or psychological causes of elevated basal heart rates are not well understood.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Origin of modern humans’ skeleton and link between physical activity and skeletal structure

Researchers report that the ‘lightly’ built skeletons of modern humans evolved late in our evolutionary history and may have resulted from a reduction in mobility and activity levels due to a shift from foraging to non-foraging lifestyles.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Income supplementation and health

Supplementation of household income for elderly residents of a Mexican city is associated with improved health and wellbeing, a study finds. Emma Aguila and colleagues tested the feasibility and potential health benefits of income supplementation among the elderly in poor countries, such as Mexico, where elderly populations, unlike resources, are rapidly growing.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Aerosol formation in the southeastern United States

Human-made pollutants enhance processes that transform naturally occurring emissions from trees into organic aerosols that can affect climate, air quality, and human health, a study finds.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Analyzing the effectiveness of scientific peer review

A study analyzing the effectiveness of scientific peer review suggests that peer review is effective at predicting ‘good’ articles but may have difficulties identifying outstanding and/or breakthrough work.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
eReading before bed

Use of light-emitting eReaders and other electronic light before bedtime may shift circadian rhythms and negatively affect sleep and alertness, according to a study. Dim light in the evening is a cue for circadian rhythms, allowing for production of melatonin, which regulates sleep.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Newly discovered assassin bug was incognito, but now it's incognita

Sometimes new insect species are discovered in the wild, and sometimes they are discovered in the drawers of old museum collections. Then there are those that are discovered by accident, which is how Dr. J. E. McPherson, professor emeritus at Southern Illinois University, discovered a new species of assassin bug.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Diazepam affects glutamatergic synaptic transmission in rats with traumatic brain injury

Diazepam has an anxiolytic action, with sedative, hypnotic, anticonvulsive and antiepileptic effects. It is a drug of first choice for controlling epileptic state.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Role of reactive astrocytes in axonal remodeling and neurological recovery after stroke

Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in adults worldwide. For decades, the primary approach and goal of therapy for stroke has focused on neuroprotection, namely treating the injured tissue, with interventions designed to reduce the volume of cerebral infarction.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Repairing leaky neurons and nervous fibers after neurotrauma with novel nanoparticles

Traumatic injuries to the central nervous system, including brain and spinal cord, commonly involve an immediate mechanical damage to cell membranes of neurons and axons, which makes it impossible for them to maintain critical differences in ions and molecules and leads to dysfunction and cell death.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Neuroactive alkaloids modulate neuronal nicotinic receptor and provide neuroprotection

Despite the advances in combinatorial or synthetic chemistry and bioinformatics, recent literature has demonstrated the relevance of nature and biomass as a source of new molecules to treat different pathologies.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
New drug treatments show neuroprotective effects in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases

Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases are a progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which we do not have a cure. There is a clear need for novel treatments, and the industry has invested billions of dollars in finding new drug treatments.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Dec-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
DTT first used for recovery from cerebellar peduncle injury caused by a cerebellar tumor

Dr. Min-Su Kim, at School of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Republic of Korea and his colleagues performed a diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) evaluation and found that the left superior cerebellar peduncle was still very thin at 3 weeks after tumor resection in a 6-year-old female patient with a tumor mainly involved in the left cerebellar hemisphere.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Showing releases 101-125 out of 684 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 ]