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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 542 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 17-Jun-2016
Science
Modeling the behavior of pro-ISIS groups online, to make predictions

Researchers developed a model aimed at identifying behavioral patterns among online supporters of ISIS and used this information to predict the onset of major violent events.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Jun-2016
Science
First detection of a chiral molecule in space

Chiral molecules have two forms that are identical in structure, but are mirror images of one another.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Jun-2016
Global Health Research and Policy
BioMed Central publishes open access journal dedicated to global health

Global Health Research and Policy, an open access, multidisciplinary, and peer-reviewed journal which aims to improve regional and global health and promote health equity by disseminating high quality research is launched today by BioMed Central in partnership with the Global Health Institute (GHI) at Wuhan University.

Contact: Anne Korn
anne.korn@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22744
BioMed Central

Public Release: 16-Jun-2016
Nano Research
Self-healing superhydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride/Fe3O4@polypyrrole fiber with core–sheath structures for superior microwave absorption

Self-healing superhydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride/Fe3O4@polypyrrole (F-PVDF/Fe3O4@PPyx) core-sheath structured fiber films were fabricated by combining electrospinning, in-situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole, and chemical modification. These films exhibit superior microwave absorption performance.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 16-Jun-2016
Nano Research
Ultrasonic-assisted pyrolyzation fabrication of reduced SnO2–x /g-C3N4 heterojunctions

Reduced SnO2–x/g-C3N4 heterojunctions were prepared by a one-step pyrolysis method by using Sn(OH)4 and melamine as the raw materials. The heterojunctions were composed by exfoliated g-C3N4 nanosheets and reduced SnO2-x nanoparticles that formed in the pyrolysis process. The reduced SnO2–x/g-C3N4 heterojunction follow the Z-scheme-type mechanism.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 16-Jun-2016
Researching how to improve certification of intelligent devices

In today’s world there are more devices capable of processing and transmitting information that monitor a multitude of physical processes in interconnected global digital networks, such as drones, autonomous cars, industrial robot chains or intelligent trains. Now a European research project called AMASS in which scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) are participating is attempting to improve the certification processes used to accredit the proper functioning of these devices.

Contact: fco javier alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 16-Jun-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Antibiotics disrupt infants’ gut microbiome, studies suggest

Two new studies of more than 80 infants altogether offer a clearer picture of how antibiotics, along with birth mode and diet, can disrupt the development of the gut microbiome.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Homologues temperature of olivine links deformation experiments and rheology of the upper mantle

The homologues temperature of a crystalline material is defined as the ratio between its temperature and the melting (solidus) temperature in Kelvin. The melting temperature of olivine decreases with increasing iron content and water content, and increases with pressure. Now the homologues temperature of olivine is used to compare the creep strength of the upper mantle in different tectonic settings, and to investigate fabric transitions of olivine in deformation experiments and natural samples.

NSFC projects (41590623 and 41172182) and grant (201311178-3) from the Ministry of Land Resources.

Contact: WANG Qin
qwang@nju.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report the synthesis of quasicrystals, which are solids with nonrepeating atomic configurations that have symmetries not seen in ordinary crystals and which have been found to occur naturally only in the Khatyrka meteorite, using an experimental shock designed to mimic collisions between extraterrestrial bodies; though the findings demonstrate that quasicrystals can form during a shock event, they do not identify a conclusive mechanism for their formation in nature.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sleep and memory consolidation

The autonomic nervous system (ANS), which controls involuntary bodily functions such as breathing and the heartbeat, plays a key role in promoting memory consolidation during sleep, a study finds.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate change and habitat corridors

Climate-change habitat corridors could allow wildlife to more easily relocate when temperature shifts render ecosystems unsuitable, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Silicic volcanism on Mars

A silica mineral discovered on Mars formed as a result of ancient high-temperature and high-silica volcanism, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
JAMA
Study finds increase in severity of firearm injuries, in-hospital fatality rate

In a study appearing in the June 14 issue of JAMA, Angela Sauaia, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, and colleagues examined patterns of gunshot wound-associated severity and mortality at a Colorado urban trauma center.

Contact: Mark Couch
Mark.Couch@ucdenver.edu
303-724-5377
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
JAMA
Study compares effectiveness of weight-loss drugs

In an analysis that included nearly 30,000 overweight or obese adults, compared with placebo, orlistat, lorcaserin, naltrexone-bupropion, phentermine-topiramate, and liraglutide were each associated with achieving at least 5 percent weight loss at 52 weeks, and phentermine-topiramate and liraglutide were associated with the highest odds of achieving at least 5 percent weight loss, according to a study appearing in the June 14 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Michelle Brubaker
mmbrubaker@ucsd.edu
619-471-9049
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
JAMA
Prescription of long-acting opioids associated with increased risk of death

Prescription of long-acting opioids for chronic noncancer pain was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, including deaths from causes other than overdose, compared with anticonvulsants or cyclic antidepressants, according to a study appearing in the June 14 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Science Bulletin
Neolithic paddy soil reveals the impacts of agricultural intensification on soil microbial diversity

A recent study examined the microbial composition and function differences between a buried Neolithic paddy soil and an adjacent, currently-cultivated paddy soil using high throughput metagenomics technologies. The results showed that the currently cultivated soil contained about 10-fold more microbial biomass than the buried one. Analyses based on both 16S rRNA genes and functional gene array showed that the currently cultivated soil had significantly higher phylogenetic diversity, but less functional diversity than the buried Neolithic one.

the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDB15020302 and XDB15020402) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (41090282)

Contact: Yongguan Zhu
ygzhu@iue.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Science
How the human brain navigates

Interactions between the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex enable humans to plan and navigate their route from one location to another, a new study reveals.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Science
Bigger and better perovskite solar cells

Researchers have identified a technique for developing perovskite solar cells that significantly increases the area of the cell, while maintaining high conversion efficiency.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Science
It’s not an illusion: Transforming infrared into visible light

Researchers have developed a compound that can transform near-infrared light into broadband white-light.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Science
Basaltic rocks in Iceland effective sinks for atmospheric carbon dioxide

Atmospheric carbon dioxide injected into volcanic rock as part of a pilot project in Iceland was almost completely mineralized, or converted to carbonate minerals, in less than two years, a new study shows.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Jun-2016
Science Translational Medicine
New technique expands pool of gene-corrected liver cells

Sean Nygaard and colleagues have developed a new technique that may help to overcome one of the largest hurdles in gene therapy—the ability to generate a large pool of gene-corrected cells that would be effective in repairing or correcting injury and disease.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Constrain the composition of Earth’s interior with elasticity of minerals

The new method, which reduces the computational loads to one-tenth of the traditional method, has been used to calculate the elasticity of many minerals with the comparable precise as those on the basis of the traditional method. These elastic data are crucial in constraining the composition and temperature of the Earth’s interior. The relevant researches have been reviewed by Wu and Wang in a paper published in SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences.

the State Key Development Program of Basic Research of China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: WU Zhongqing
wuzq10@ustc.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report a method for engineering E. coli to produce membrane vesicles containing surfaces coated with O-antigen polysaccharides (O-PS) from pathogenic bacteria, and that mice immunized with vesicles containing Francisella tularensis O-PS survived longer and produced more O-PS-specific antibodies following infection with F. tularensis than control mice.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genomics of ancient Aboriginal Australians

Researchers report a complete mitochondrial genome of an ancient Australian Aborigine.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancestry of early European farmers

A study suggests that the first European farmers migrated from modern-day Greece and Turkey.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 101-125 out of 542 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]