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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 614 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 25-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Olive production in a warming climate

A study predicts that a 1.8 °C average temperature increase in the Mediterranean Basin could increase profits from olive production by as much as 41% in some regions, while decreasing profits by as much as 7.2% in other regions.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Low literacy about health insurance and the Affordable Care Act

According to a study, Americans may not be well-prepared to make informed decisions about health insurance options under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA provides a market for private health insurance companies to compete for customers so that individual health insurance costs are kept low, but prices drop only when individuals encourage competition among insurance companies by making informed choices about available plans.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Mar-2014
Keep calm and don your video glasses

Music may soothe the soul, but it takes video to calm a patient undergoing medical treatment, notes a study in which individuals watched television shows or movies through special video glasses while having a biopsy or other minimally invasive treatment. The research is being presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 39th Annual Scientific Meeting.


Contact: Ellen Acconcia
eacconcia@sirweb.org
703-460-5582
Society of Interventional Radiology

Public Release: 23-Mar-2014
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry
The molecular imprinted electrochemical sensor based on the multiple labeling strategy

A novel method to improve the sensitivity of the molecular imprinted electrochemical sensor based on the multiple labeling strategy


This work was Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(Nos. 91023046,91023017,51075056), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Nos. 21165007,21375031)

Contact: LI JP
likianping@263.net
Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry

Public Release: 22-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Electroacupuncture effect on depression and variation of polygenes expression

Preliminary basic research and clinical findings have demonstrated that electroacupuncture therapy exhibits positive effects in ameliorating depression.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 22-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
GDNF transfection promotes neuronal differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

Studies have shown that the differentiation rate of grafted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into mature neuron-like cells is very low.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
Physical Review Letters
A mathematical equation that explains the behavior of nanofoams

A research study, participated in by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), has discovered that nanometric-size foam structures follow the same universal laws as does soap lather: small bubbles disappear in favor of the larger ones.


Contact: OIC
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Who reprograms rat astrocytes into neurons?

To date, it remains poorly understood whether astrocytes can be easily reprogrammed into neurons. Mash1 and Brn2 have been previously shown to cooperate to reprogram fibroblasts into neurons.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy: nerve injury and regeneration

Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy: nerve injury and regeneration


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
Science
Crows, cuckoos and the occasional benefits of parasitism

A 16-year study of great spotted cuckoos and the carrion crows on which they act as nest parasites (by sneaking their own eggs into the crows’ nests), reveals that these parasitic cuckoos can also help their hosts by repelling predators.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
Science
Study indicates royal ferns are 'living fossils'

Researchers have discovered a 180 million-year-old fossil fern with pristinely preserved subcellular structures, including its nuclei and chromosomes, which closely resemble those of today’s cinnamon fern, Osmundastrum cinnamomeum.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
Science
The nose knows more than we thought

New research shows that the human nose can distinguish a trillion different combinations of odors -- many more than researchers had thought. While humans can differentiate among several million different colors and almost half a million different tones, research suggests they can only distinguish about 10,000 unique scents, but this was never validated with experimental evidence.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Mar-2014
Science
The proteins that put plants on land?

Before Earth’s early plant life could make the transition from water to land, such botanical pioneers had to evolve specialized cells for conducting water -- and a particular group of proteins, known as NAC transcription factors, likely played a significant role in that development, according to a new study.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
China Science Bulletin
Why can’t a leaf enlarge indefinitely?

Leaf size is one of the factors that determine energy capture and carbon acquisition. A recent study indicated a remarkable level of structural heterogeneity within the giant leaves of Musa balbisiana Colla (Musaceae). This structural heterogeneity constrains the physiological function in the marginal region so that restricts the further enlargement in large leaves. This study has been published on CHINESE SCIENCE BULLETIN(In Chinese), 2014, No.6.


National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31170399) and Guangxi University Research Grant (No.XDZ120929)

Contact: Kun-Fang Cao
caokf@xtbg.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy
Migration in China: shifting slightly, but still going strong

The brain drain of educated workers is still felt most severely in China’s central and western provinces, since most knowledge-based industries are generally concentrated in its large coastal cities. However, low-educated migrant workers increasingly find jobs in their home provinces in the central and western regions because of changing economic and government policy.


Contact: Alexander Brown
alexander.brown@springer.com
212-620-8063
Springer Science+Business Media

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Unraveling the antibody mystery in HIV vaccine trials

An antibody of the IgG3 type, an antibody subclass known to protect against malaria and other infectious diseases, may be responsible for the variable immune response triggered by two different HIV vaccines in recent clinical trials, two new studies report.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
China Science Bulletin
Qianlong I 6000m depth rated AUV successfully completed experimental application

Qianlong I 6000m depth rated AUV is developed independently in China and had successfully completed experimental application, in which about 33 square kilometers data had been acquired, such as bathymetry sidescan data, sub-bottom profile data and ocean physical data. This study has been published on CHINESE SCIENCE BULLETIN(In Chinese), 2013, 58(S2).


China Ocean Mineral Resources R&D Association (Grant Nos. DYXM-125-21-JS-02)

Contact: XU Huixi
xhx@sia.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
JAMA
Risk of psychiatric diagnoses, medication use increases after critical illness

Chicago – Critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation had a higher prevalence of prior psychiatric diagnoses and an increased risk of a new psychiatric diagnosis and medication use after hospital discharge, according to a study in the March 19 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Christian F. Christiansen, M.D., Ph.D.
cc@dce.au.dk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
JAMA
Pregnancy associated with greater risk of certain bacterial infection, which may worsen outcomes

Chicago – In a surveillance study of infection with the bacterium Haemophilus influenza among women of reproductive age in England and Wales from 2009-2012, pregnancy was associated with a greater risk of this infection, which was associated with poor pregnancy outcomes such as premature birth and stillbirth, according to a study in the March 19 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Shamez N. Ladhani, M.R.C.P.C.H., Ph.D.
Shamez.Ladhani@phe.gov.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
China Science Bulletin
A progress in regional air pollution and photochemical processes over China

China has suffered severe regional air pollution. Recent study reveals the chemical characteristics of extensive pollution plumes over North China, providing an important clue for further investigations of how strong pollution emissions from large urban and industrial centers impact regional air quality. This study has been published on CHINESE SCIENCE BULLETIN, 2013, No. 34.


National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 40433008);National Basic Research Program of China (2011CB706903);China Special Fund for Meteorological Research in the Public Interest (GYHY201206015);European Research Council under the European Union's

Contact: Ma Jianzhong
mjz@cams.cma.gov.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Effect of receptor activity-modifying protein-1 on vascular smooth muscle cells

Although transplanting mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can improve cardiac function and contribute to endothelial recovery in a damaged artery, MSCs may induce neointimal hyperplasia by directly or indirectly acting on vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs).Receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) is the specificity receptors of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). CGRP and its receptor involve the proliferation and the apoptosis in vivo and in vitro, exogenous RAMP1 enhances the antiproliferation effect of CGRP in VSMCs.


Natural Science Foundation of China, International Cooperative Project of Guizhou Province

Contact: Bei Shi
shi_bei2147@126.com
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

According to a study, compared with control mice, mice lacking the gene tmf1 produce a thicker, more robust mucus layer in the gut that promotes colonization and growth of probiotic bacteria and increases resistance to induced colitis, a resistance that the mice can transmit to other mice that possess the gene.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Global impact of fishing bycatch on air-breathing animals

A global assessment of fisheries bycatch finds hotspot regions where the impact of bycatch on species and species assemblages is particularly severe. Modern fishing techniques capture both target catch and non-target bycatch species.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bacteria programmed to monitor gut environment

According to a study, E. coli can be engineered to detect an environmental stimulus inside the gut of a living mouse, and record and report the stimulus noninvasively. Previous research has demonstrated that genetic systems can be engineered to detect, record, and report signals from an environment in vitro. Pamela A. Silver and colleagues attempted to engineer a genetic system in E. coli gut bacteria to enable environmental monitoring inside a living system.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Pre-colonization populations of extinct New Zealand moa

A study finds that populations of moa in New Zealand, extinct since around 1400 A.D., bore no genetic signs of population decline before humans arrived.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 101-125 out of 614 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]