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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 727 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ]

Public Release: 22-Nov-2014
Structural Dynamics
New model clarifies photoexcited thin-film lattice dynamics

A research team from Germany developed an analytical model to describe the structural dynamics of photoexcited thin films and verified it by ultrafast X-ray diffraction.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Science
Making better vaccines by getting ahead of flu evolution

It may be better to pre-emptively vaccinate against likely future strains of the influenza virus than to use a strain already circulating in the human population, a new study shows. This knowledge could help scientists make an already effective vaccine even more effective.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Science
Unexpected benefits of HIV drugs revealed in mice

A new study in mice shows that a popular class of HIV drugs, known as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), is effective in treating disorders such as retinal degeneration and graft-versus-host disease.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Science
Humans needed barley to reach the roof of the world

It took the arrival of western cereal grains, particularly barley, for humans to establish permanent residence above 3,000 meters on the Tibetan Plateau, researchers say. Despite evidence of intermittent human settlements in the region dating back to at least 20,000 years ago, Fahu Chen and colleagues say that humans didn’t get a solid foothold there -- the so-called “roof of the world” -- until about 5,200 years ago.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Repair effects of VEGF165-transfected NSCs transplantation in cerebral palsy rats

Repair effects of VEGF165-transfected NSCs transplantation in cerebral palsy rats

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Embryonic neural stem cell apoptosis in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Embryonic neural stem cell apoptosis in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Neurotrophic factors: from neurodevelopmental regulators to novel therapies for PD

Neurotrophic factors: from neurodevelopmental regulators to novel therapies for Parkinson’s disease

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Maternal gut microbiota influences fetal blood-brain barrier

Research in mice reveals that a mother’s gut microbiota may affect fetal blood-brain barrier development. The findings hint that environmental cues during pregnancy such as diet may influence the genes responsible for forming and maintaining the blood-brain barrier, which protects the brain from many common bacterial infections.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
Mouse-to-human genome comparison explains DNA evolution

A comprehensive study comparing regions of mouse and human DNA that control gene expression reveals that about a third of them are conserved between the two species, which separated approximately 550 million years ago. The dataset provided here will be useful to researchers trying to understand how mammalian regulatory DNA has evolved.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
The anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-xL is necessary for normal neuronal process extension

Bcl-xL is a pro-survival protein that interacts with outer mitochondrial membrane proteins and also with the ATP synthase at the inner membrane. Bcl-xL conserves neuronal energy and facilitates synaptic function. We report that Bcl-xL is required for normal outgrowth of neuronal processes. Our findings suggest that Bcl-xL regulates specific molecular pathways opposed by Death Receptor 6 in order to produce protection of neurites during hypoxia and to regulate neuronal process pruning during development and plasticity.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Microfluidic systems for axonal growth and regeneration research

Microfluidic systems for axonal growth and regeneration research

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Transcranial magnetic stimulation: potential treatment for co-occurring alcohol, TBI and PTSD

Transcranial magnetic stimulation: potential treatment for co-occurring alcohol, traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorders

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mapping the vulnerability of Ebola virus

Researchers report a structural analysis of the antibodies in ZMapp™, an experimental treatment against Ebola virus infection that is now under development. Comprised of a cocktail of antibodies raised in rodents and modified for human use, ZMapp™ was administered to several patients during the ongoing 2014 Ebola virus outbreak, but the antibodies’ mechanism of action remains unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Virus implicated in sea star wasting disease

A study shows that sea star wasting disease (SSWD) is likely caused by a virus and identifies a densovirus, present in the environment since at least 1942, that may be responsible. Since 2013, at least 20 sea star species have suffered heavy losses along the Pacific coast between Alaska and Mexico due to an unknown cause.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

According to a Perspective, intermittent energy restrictions such as alternate-day fasting or overnight fasting can counteract disease processes by spurring fat metabolism, reducing systemic inflammation, and stimulating cellular repair mechanisms.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ethnic diversity and price bubbles

A region’s ethnic diversity can mitigate stock market bubbles by improving traders’ pricing accuracy, according to a study. Price bubbles, in which traders collectively price assets above their true value, can financially devastate individuals and nations, but their causes remain elusive.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Obesity effects from circadian misalignment

A study indicates that nightshift work reduces total daily energy expenditure. While eating at times when circadian rhythms promote sleep is emerging as a risk factor for obesity, the mechanism by which circadian misalignment may lead to weight gain in humans is unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate change and the end of the Bronze Age

According to a study, population decline in Ireland at the end of the Bronze Age began around a century before an abrupt climate change in the region, suggesting that climate change may not have caused the population collapse. High-resolution archaeological and climate data enable re-examination of previous suggestions that climate change caused civilization collapses such as that of the Bronze Age society in northwestern Europe.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Battery self-charges from thermal energy

Researchers have devised a self-charging battery that generates electricity from low-temperature heat sources, according to a study. Industrial and environmental processes can create reservoirs of stored thermal energy, but despite decades of research, systems designed to reclaim the energy are inefficient, complex, and costly.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain response to a lost first language

A study of Chinese children adopted into French-speaking families reveals that the brain maintains responsiveness to Chinese in spite of discontinued use of the language. During early exposure to a language, the brain forms representations of sound stimuli that comprise the language, but it is unknown whether the brain maintains or degrades sound representations in the absence of continued exposure.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Edaravone promotes functional recovery after mechanical peripheral nerve injury

Edaravone promotes functional recovery after mechanical peripheral nerve injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Schwann cells from skin-derived precursors promote peripheral nerve regeneration in rats

Schwann cells from skin-derived precursors promote peripheral nerve regeneration in rats

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Why can bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells directionally migrate to the injured spinal cord?

Why can bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells directionally migrate to the injured spinal cord?

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
JAMA
Use of beta-blockers by patients with certain type of heart failure associated with improved rate of survival

Lars H. Lund, M.D., Ph.D., of the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues conducted a study to examine whether beta-blockers are associated with reduced mortality in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction (a measure of how well the left ventricle of the heart pumps with each contraction).The study appears in the November 19 issue of JAMA, a cardiovascular disease theme issue.

Contact: Elaine St. Peter
estpeter@partners.org
617-525-6375
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
JAMA
Implanted device shows potential as alternative to sarfarin for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation

Vivek Y. Reddy, M.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and colleagues examined the long-term efficacy and safety, compared to warfarin, of a device to achieve left atrial appendage closure in patients with atrial fibrillation. The study appears in the November 19 issue of JAMA, a cardiovascular disease theme issue.

Contact: Lauren Woods
Lauren.Woods@mountsinai.org
646-634-0869
The JAMA Network Journals

Showing releases 101-125 out of 727 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ]