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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 721 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Buyang Huanwu decoction for neuroprotection of cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal damage

Buyang Huanwu decoction for neuroprotection of cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal damage

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
JAMA
Combination treatment for metastatic melanoma results in longer overall survival

Among patients with metastatic melanoma, treatment with a combination of the drugs sargramostim plus ipilimumab, compared with ipilimumab alone, resulted in longer overall survival and lower toxicity, but no difference in progression-free survival, according to a study in the November 5 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Teresa Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5653
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
JAMA
Nonobstructive coronary artery disease associated with increased risk of heart attack, death

In a study that included nearly 38,000 patients, those diagnosed with nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) had a significantly increased risk of heart attack or death one year after diagnosis, according to a study in the November 5 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Daniel Warvi
303-393-5205
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Tooth loss inhibits neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult mice

Tooth loss inhibits neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult mice

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Favonoids of S. baicalensis G. reduce apoptotic cortical neurons in the hypoxic brain

Favonoids of S. baicalensis G. reduce apoptotic cortical neurons in the hypoxic brain

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

An algorithm predicts that long-range dispersal of evolutionary novelties, such as individuals and pathogens, across a population increases their rate of spread and is also influenced by the frequency and effectiveness of the long-range dispersal events, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Age and brain network segregation

With age comes decreasing segregation of brain systems, and low levels of segregation among these systems may be associated with poor long-term memory, a study suggests. Brain networks consist of groups of highly interacting nodes, which can be groups of brain cells that comprise brain areas.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Protecting against injury from battery ingestion

A pressure-sensitive conductive coating may protect against injury from accidental battery ingestion, according to a study. Ingested batteries, particularly small button-style batteries, can lead to choking and can damage tissues by short-circuiting in intestinal fluid.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Life purpose and healthcare-seeking behavior

A strong life purpose may heighten interest in preventive healthcare services and reduce hospitalization, a study suggests. Pursuing a goal-driven existence is associated with better health, but few researchers have explored the relationship between life purpose and patterns of healthcare use.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Human ability to evaluate probabilities

A study involving Mayan adults without formal education suggests a human ability for probabilistic evaluations irrespective of schooling and culture. Although humans routinely make rational choices by evaluating the likelihood of probabilistic outcomes, researchers remain uncertain whether this ability emerges spontaneously during childhood or is acquired via formal educational or cultural exposure.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Air pollution and crop yield in India

In addition to contributing to global climate change, pollutants such as tropospheric ozone and black carbon may have direct, negative impacts on grain yield in India, with recent increases in emissions of atmospheric pollutants possibly decreasing projected yields by up to 50%. The direct effect of atmospheric pollutants on plant growth exacerbates the climatic effects of changing temperature and precipitation on agriculture.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gut bacteria and human evolution

A study suggests that the diversity of human gut bacteria declined since the human-chimpanzee split during evolution. The communities of microorganisms inhabiting the human body, known as the microbiome, are influenced by host genetics, lifestyle, and environment.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Forests lose essential nitrogen in surprising way, find scientists

Even during summer dry spells, some patches of soil in forested watersheds remain waterlogged. Researchers have discovered that these patches act as hot spots of microbial activity that remove nitrogen from groundwater and return it to the atmosphere, as reported in a Nov. 3 article in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 1-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Virtual reality training improves balance function

Virtual reality training improves balance function

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 1-Nov-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
MRS is invalid to detect methylmercury chloride damage to the adult rat hippocampus

MRS is invalid to detect methylmercury chloride damage to the adult rat hippocampus

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Cells Reports
One hormone, two roles: Sugars differentiate seasonality and metabolism

Scientists at Institutes in Nagoya and Chicago have discovered the mechanism on how a single hormone triggers two different functions, i.e. seasonal sensing and metabolism, without any cross activity.

Contact: Ayako Miyazaki
press@itbm.nagoya-u.ac.jp
81-527-894-999
Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Tea and citrus products could lower ovarian cancer risk, new UEA research finds

Tea and citrus fruits and juices are associated with a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).

Contact: Laura Potts
laura.potts@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-93007
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Prize-winning essay -- How neural circuits control skilled behaviors

Reaching out to catch a ball may seem a simple move, but it actually requires motor neuron circuits to fire in a carefully coordinated way, course correcting if the arm isn’t on track to reach the target. For this to happen, motor neurons cannot fire in a single burst; instead, their activity must be continually adjusted as the arm extends toward its mark.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Earth’s Animals Had to Wait for Air

Did the appearance of animal life on Earth approximately 700 to 800 million years ago simply stem from genetic and developmental innovations? Or did the planet’s environment play a significant role in its timing?

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Multiple interventions needed to stop Ebola’s spread in West Africa

Without a more concerted effort to isolate Ebola cases at hospitals, quarantine patients’ contacts, and implement sanitary funeral practices in Liberia, where the 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak has hit the hardest, the virus will continue to spread, researchers say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Crossbred mice reveal genetic influence on Ebola outcome

Working under stringent biosafety conditions, researchers have identified a line of laboratory mice that respond to Ebola virus with a range of symptoms -- from fatal hemorrhagic fever to complete resistance -- like humans do. Their results suggest that genetic makeup plays a significant role in determining disease outcome, and their mouse model of the disease may help to screen candidate therapeutics and vaccines.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Asian fungus threatens world’s salamanders and newts

This study by An Martel and colleagues highlights the chytrid fungus known as Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans, which recently caused rapid declines in populations of European fire salamanders. The researchers first studied 35 species of amphibians and found that only salamanders and newts were susceptible to the pathogen.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Autophagy in 1 hour of ATP after neuronal damage: ATP neuroprotection against apoptosis

Autophagy in 1 hour of ATP after neuronal damage: ATP neuroprotection against apoptosis.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Damage of hippocampal neurons during chronic alcoholism

Damage of hippocampal neurons during chronic alcoholism.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Showing releases 101-125 out of 721 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]