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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 516 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic effects of early human expansion

Researchers report evidence for the genetic impact of early human expansion out of Africa. Each human genome carries hundreds of potentially deleterious mutations, but it is unclear how the number of deleterious mutations varies among populations.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic shifts mirror onset of Irish farming and metallurgy

Ancient DNA analysis suggests large-scale genetic changes that parallel the onset of the Neolithic transition and Bronze Age in Ireland, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Assessing impacts of mercury control policy

Researchers report estimates of the economic impact of mercury controls. Estimating the benefits from environmental policies has been historically difficult, due to large uncertainties and knowledge gaps in the processes that toxins such as mercury undergo prior to human exposure.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Drivers of mangrove deforestation

Global demand for palm oil, rice, and aquaculture products is contributing to deforestation of mangrove forests in Southeast Asia, with oil palm development, in particular, representing a growing deforestation driver, according to a study. Mangrove forests provide valuable ecosystem services, including carbon storage and coastal protection.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Forest water loss during the California drought

Researchers report substantial water loss from forests in California during the 2012-2015 drought. California’s forests provide numerous products and services to the state, such as water provisioning, carbon storage, timber, and ecotourism.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Long-lasting cocaine-catalyzing enzymes

A study finds that fusing cocaine hydrolase enzymes with the Fc region of human antibodies yields long-lasting acceleration of cocaine metabolism in rats.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Integrated screening of human embryos for genetic defects

Researchers report a cost-effective, integrated method based on next-generation DNA sequencing to screen human embryos for genetic defects during preimplantation genetic diagnosis and screening.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Lapita origin of Polynesians

Analysis of the oldest-known cemetery in the South Pacific may help resolve a longstanding debate over the origins and ancestry of Polynesians.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Response of the Amazon to climate change

A study explores how the responses of Amazon forests to climate change are influenced by the responses of individual trees to changes in soil moisture availability.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Dec-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Blocking calcium channel may delay premature birth

Researchers have uncovered a calcium channel’s role in triggering uterine contractions during labor, which can be blocked to delay premature birth, they go on to show in rodents.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Dec-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Serpentinization―nutrients of biological organisms in hydrothermal fields

Serpentinization is potentially significant for the origin and evolution of life during the early history of the Earth and possibly on other planets. The dependence of starting materials and their initial grain sizes on the formation of gases (H2, CH4, C2H6 and C3H8) during serpentinization was investigated by conducting hydrothermal experiments at 311°C and 3 kbar on olivine and peridotite with initial grain sizes ranging from <30 to 177µm.

the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41090373, 41121002, 41103012 and 41173069), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB06030100),Postdoctoral Science Foundation of China (Grant No.

Contact: Ruifang Huang
rfhuang@gig.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 23-Dec-2015
JAMA
Findings suggest increased number of IVF cycles can be beneficial

Although in vitro fertilization (IVF) is often limited to 3 or 4 treatment cycles, new research shows the effectiveness of extending the number of IVF cycles beyond this number, according to a study in the Dec. 22, 2015 - Dec. 29, 2015 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Debbie A. Lawlor
d.a.lawlor@bristol.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 23-Dec-2015
JAMA
Long-term outcomes of preventing premature menopause during chemotherapy

Compared with receiving chemotherapy alone, women with breast cancer who also received the hormonal drug triptorelin to achieve ovarian suppression had a higher long-term probability of ovarian function recovery, without a statistically significant difference in pregnancy rate or disease-free survival, according to a study in the December 22, 2015 - Dec. 29, 2015 issue of JAMA.

Contact: John Noble
johnw_noble@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
China successfully developed "Darwin", a neuromorphic chip based on spiking neural networks

Spiking Neural Network (SNN) is a type of biologically-inspired neural networks that perform information processing based on discrete-time spikes. Recently, researchers from Zhejiang University and Hangzhou Dianzi University in Hangzhou, China developed the Darwin Neural Processing Unit (NPU), a neuromorphic hardware co-processor based on Spiking Neural Networks, fabricated by standard CMOS technology. This research is reported in a paper to be published in SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences, 2016(2)issue.

National Key Basic Research Program of China (2013CB329504)

Contact: ZHU XiaoLei
zhuxl@vlsi.zju.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that sorghum seed exchange between farmers on Mount Kenya was more likely to occur between members of the same residential or ethnolinguistic group than between members of different groups, a finding that could be explained by the propensity for exchange to occur between relatives and that suggests how social practices can influence crop diversity.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mapping US wild bee abundance and declines

A study mapping wild bee abundance in the United States finds regions of estimated bee decline and likely mismatches between crop pollination needs and wild bees. Like honey bees, wild bees are important crop pollinators that face threats including habitat loss, environmental pesticide exposure, and climate change.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Dog domestication may have enriched harmful genetic changes

A study suggests that dog domestication may have inadvertently led to an enrichment of harmful genetic changes. Domestication of dogs from gray wolves more than 15,000 years ago involved artificial selection, inbreeding, and population bottlenecks, but the precise effects of these demographic processes on the buildup of harmful genetic changes in dog genomes remain unclear.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Retinal transplantation in primate models of retinitis pigmentosa

Researchers report the successful transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal tissue in primate models of retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited eye disease with few treatment options.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reliability of eyewitness testimony

The accuracy of eyewitness identifications in police lineups increases with the confidence of the witness, a study finds.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Characterizing plant life histories

Plant life history strategies can be characterized by species’ survival rates, growth rates, and reproductive strategies, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 18-Dec-2015
Nano Research
Anelasticity of twinned CuO nanowires

Anelastic behavior is observed in twinned CuO NWs. In situ transmission electron microscopy studies suggest that anelasticity is intrinsic to the CuO NWs. A mechanism based on the cooperative motion of twin-associated atoms is proposed to account for this phenomenon.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 18-Dec-2015
Science
HKU scientists find 3 coronavirus species co-circulating in dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia

An international research team, led by The University of Hong Kong, revealed that the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus has become enzootic in dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia and diverged into five distinct lineages. Viruses that led to the Korean outbreak and the recent human infections in the Middle East were from lineage 5 and generated by recombination between viruses of lineages 3 and 4.

Contact: Pinky Yu
pinkyyu@hku.hk
852-391-79306
University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Dec-2015
Science
Inadequate policies for hunting large carnivores

Many policies regulating carnivore hunting do not adequately acknowledge and address the negative effects of hunting on demography and population dynamics, authors of this Policy Forum say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Dec-2015
Science
Algal toxin impairs sea lion memory and foraging

A new study shows that a neurotoxin produced by algae disrupts the memory of California sea lions, animals that rely heavily on recall of food-rich locations to forage.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Dec-2015
Science
Science’s 2015 Breakthrough of the Year: CRISPR

Science has chosen the genome editing method called CRISPR as its 2015 Breakthrough of the Year, an 'unprecedented selection,' Managing News Editor John Travis explains, given that the technique appeared twice before among Science’s runner-ups, and is the only runner-up to subsequently be elevated to Breakthrough status.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 101-125 out of 516 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]