EurekAlert from AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
31-Oct-2014 14:08
Beijing Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Breaking News

Multimedia Gallery

Subscribe/Sponsor

Interviews

Events Calendar

Selected Science Sources in China

MOST

CAS

CAE

CAST

NSFC

CASS

CAAS

CAMS

RSS

EurekAlert!

Text Size Option

Language

English (英文)

Chinese (中文)

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 703 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Water in the solar system predates the sun, study suggests

A new study suggests that a significant portion of the solar system’s water formed before the sun did, and that all planetary systems -- not just ours -- may have had access to that same water as they formed.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Stone tool-making method evolved simultaneously in different groups

A stone tool-making technology, thought to have originated in Africa and then spread to Eurasia may have evolved independently in the latter region, a new study reports.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
China Science Bulletin
Uncover the Mysteries of Ebola Virus Disease

As one of the world's most virulent diseases, the Ebola virus disease is now attracting worldwide attention. A nearly published review made an overview of its virology, immunopathology, pathogenic mechanism as well the achievements of drugs and vaccines of the disease. This review has been published in Chinese Science Bulletin.

Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention;Chinese Academy of Sciences

Contact: YU HongJie
yuhj@chinacdc.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
How to distinguish between fog and haze in routine observation?

There remains one question in atmospheric observation that how to distinguish between fog and haze. A new method was raised recently to distinguish between fog and haze based on the difference of their physical properties. This method applies to most of the metrological and environmental observation stations since it requires only routine measurements. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences, 2014, No.9.

Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB403402) and the Basic Research Fund of Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences (Grant No. 2008Z011)

Contact: ZHAO Chunsheng
zcs@pku.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
How large was Lake Qinghai during the Ming Dynasty?

The preservation conditions and otolith microchemistry of the naked carp Gymnocypris przewalskii (Kessler) sampled near the Bird Island, offshore Lake Qinghai indicated that the water level of Lake Qinghai during the Ming Dynasty of China was at least 8 meters higher than the present, i.e. an area of 220 km2 larger than now. This work was published on Issue 8 of Science China: Earth Sciences (in both Chinese and English versions) in 2014.

National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2010CB833400);National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41225015, 41172308)

Contact: JIN Zhangdong
zhdjin@ieecas.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Researchers convert carbon dioxide into a valuable resource

Researchers at Aalto University have opened a pilot plant that converts CO2 and slag, the by-product of steel manufacturing, into a valuable mineral product. The product, Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC), is used in e.g. plastics, papers, rubbers and paints. The innovative plant represents the next stage prior commercialization of a new process that consumes CO2 in order to convert a low-value by-product into a highly valuable resource for industry.

Contact: Arshe Said
arshe.said@aalto.fi
358-505-718-886
Aalto University

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Bouncing back from surgery: blood test may predict recovery time

A technique that allows scientists to detect immune responses at the single-cell level could form the basis for a blood test that predicts how quickly a patient will recover from surgery. After a surgical procedure, patients are often left wondering how quickly they will recover, and when they can get back to work or take care of their families.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderson@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Use of decision-support guide for prenatal genetic testing and removing costs for testing results in less prenatal test use

An intervention for pregnant women that included a computerized, interactive decision-support guide regarding prenatal genetic testing, and no cost for testing, resulted in less prenatal test use and more informed choices, according to a study in the September 24 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Laura Kurtzman
Laura.Kurtzman@ucsf.edu
415-476-3163
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Rate of diabetes in U.S. may be leveling off

Following a doubling of the incidence and prevalence of diabetes in the U.S. from 1990-2008, new data suggest a plateauing of the rate between 2008 and 2012 for adults, however the incidence continued to increase in Hispanic and non-Hispanic black adults, according to a study in the September 24 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Karen Hunter
ksh7@cdc.gov
404-639-3286
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Chaos
Diabetes: Complexity Lost

researchers at Harvard Medical School has discovered that there may be more to tiny fluctuations in blood sugar than meets the eye. Extracting this information may illuminate some of the poorly understood frontiers of human physiology and possibly even suggest new ways to monitor and treat diabetes.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Compositions of Multiple sulfur and oxygen isotopes in haze aerosol and the implication

Haze aerosols possess an obvious environment and health effect. It is an accurate and advanced technique to study the source and formation of sulfate as well as isotope fractionation in haze aerosols using multiple sulfur and oxygen isotopes, which is favorable for studying haze pollution and sulfur isotope mass-independent fractionation. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences(In Chinese), 2014, No.7.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 141240025 and 41373023). The Ministry of Education of Overseas Returnees Start-up Fund (No. 2012s001)

Contact: GUO Zhaobing
guocumt@nuist.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
Musical genes are more suitable for storing by the semi-structured mode

Properties of music can be determined by studying “musical genes” which have mapping relationship with musical properties. This relationship can be achieved by data mining techniques. However, the existing mining techniques do not apply to sheet music recorded the traditional storage. And the semi-structured storage has these advantages. This study has been published on SCIENTIA SINICA Informationis, 2014, No.7.

National Program on Key Basic Research Project of China (Grant No.2010CB334709); National Social Science Grand Foundation of China (Grant No.12AZD120); Natural Science Foundation of Jilin Province of China (Grant No.201215045)

Contact: Te Rigen
277093537@qq.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

The acute mechanosensitivity of neurons innervating the bills of tactile foraging birds may account for the birds’ ability to feed by relying almost entirely on the sense of touch, possibly at the expense of thermosensitivity, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Subjective perceptions of similarity

Elements of an individual’s unique perception of the world may be discernible via brain imaging, according to a study. Previous studies of vision perception have focused on similarities between individuals’ brain responses instead of idiosyncratic differences. Nikolaus Kriegeskorte and colleagues monitored brain activity in 20 participants who viewed images of objects such as faces and houses.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Early human settlement in Central Europe

Modern humans may have migrated into Austria around 43,500 years ago during a cold period with a steppe-like climate, according to a study. Remains of early humans in Europe are scarce and often found without archaeological context, confounding efforts to determine the timing and climatic conditions of modern humans’ appearance.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Beat synchronization and reading readiness in preschoolers

A study finds that preschoolers’ ability to synchronize beats may predict early language skills, including reading acquisition. Spoken language includes rhythm cues that assist in discerning words and syllables, and language and reading difficulties have been associated with impaired perception of rhythmic patterns.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Firelight conversations and cultural development

Firelight time and nighttime conversations likely allowed early hunter-gatherer societies to participate in social interactions without interfering with economically productive activities and to develop and strengthen cultural institutions, according to a study. In addition to revolutionizing human diets by cooking, control of fire altered circadian rhythms and extended the day.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Brainwave test could improve autism diagnosis and classification

September 22, 2014 – (BRONX, NY) – A new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University suggests that measuring how fast the brain responds to sights and sounds could help in objectively classifying people on the autism spectrum and may help diagnose the condition earlier. The paper was published today in the online edition of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities.

Contact: Kim Newma
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
European Summer School
Research on Photoacoustics to Detect Breast Cancer

One of the lines of research of OILTEBIA, a European science project coordinated by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, is a method to detect breast cancer based on photoacoustics and which could become an alternative to mammography or sonogram. OILTEBIA held its first “European Summer School” on laser techniques and optical imaging for biomedical applications from September 15th to 19th on the Leganés campus of the UC3M.

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
fjalonso@bib.uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Nature Climate Change
CO2 emissions set to reach new 40 billion tonne record high in 2014

Carbon dioxide emissions, the main contributor to global warming, are set to rise again in 2014 - reaching a record high of 40 billion tonnes.

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 20-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Insights for Novel Neural Regeneration with the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin

Acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders affect more than 30 million individuals throughout the world to lead to significant death and disability. A very exciting avenue for neurodegenerative diseases that can offer new strategies for neural regeneration involves the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR).

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Integration of animal behaviors under stresses with different time courses

Integration of animal behaviors under stresses with different time courses

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 20-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Ganoderma lucidum pretreatment against cerebral I/R injury in the hippocampus

Ganoderma lucidum pretreatment against cerebral I/R injury in the hippocampus

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
First dark matter search results from the PandaX-I experiment

The PandaX collaboration has just released the first dark matter searching results from their first stage detector with 120 kg of xenon. The full article will appear in SCINENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy, 2014, 57(11): 2024-2030.

This work was supported by the 985-III grant from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the National Basic Research Program of China from Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2010CB833005), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Gran

Contact: Ji XiangDong
xdji@sjtu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Cortical activation patterns accompanying somatosensory recovery in a stroke patient

Cortical activation patterns accompanying somatosensory recovery in a stroke patient

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Showing releases 101-125 out of 703 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]