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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 536 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Tapping into behavioral economics to boost clinical trial participation

Behavioral economics may offer a powerful tool for improving patient enrollment in clinical trials, argue Eric VanEpps, Kevin Volpp, and Scott Halpern in this Focus.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Using 3D textile manufacturing methods and gene therapy techniques, researchers engineered anatomically shaped, functional cartilage capable of mediating controlled expression of anti-inflammatory molecules and providing mechanical functionality upon implantation, indicating a potential use for the engineered cartilage in total biological joint resurfacing therapies in osteoarthritis treatment.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Phylogeography and evolution

A series of articles from the Sackler Colloquium on In the Light of Evolution X: Comparative Phylogeography present recent developments in phylogeography-the study of the spatial distribution of genealogical lineages.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Beliefs, poverty, and academic achievement

Students who believe that intelligence is malleable can be shielded from some of the negative effects of poverty on academic achievement, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Testing the authenticity of nuclear warheads

Researchers report a potential method to authenticate undetonated nuclear warheads without revealing sensitive design-related information.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Lifespan changes in cognitive ability

A study explores lifespan changes in human cognitive ability.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
San Andreas tremors and low-frequency earthquakes

Small, deep earthquakes in the San Andreas Fault are most likely to occur when the Earth tide waxes, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
JAMA
IVF treatment not associated with increased risk of breast cancer

Among women undergoing fertility treatment in the Netherlands between 1980 and 1995, the use of in vitro fertilization (IVF) compared with non-IVF treatment was not associated with increased risk of breast cancer after a median follow-up of 21 years, according to a study appearing in the July 19 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Flora E. van Leeuwen
f.v.leeuwen@nki.nl
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
JAMA
Medication implant may improve opioid abstinence among adults with opioid dependence

In a study appearing in the July 19 issue of JAMA, Richard N. Rosenthal, M.D., of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and colleagues examined if 6-month subdermal buprenorphine implants maintained low to no illicit opioid use relative to daily sublingual (beneath the tongue) buprenorphine among currently stable opioid-dependent patients receiving buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

Contact: Sasha Walek
sasha.walek@mountsinai.org
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 18-Jul-2016
New guidance system with 3-D sounds for the visually impaired

The visually impaired will be able to use a new system of sensorial guidance that uses 3-D sounds. The system was developed by Geko NAVSAT, a company that receives assistance from the Business Incubator at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) Science Park. The application is designed to be installed in a mobile phone and uses satellite navigation and augmented acoustic reality to indicate to the user the correct path that is clear of obstacles.

Contact: fco javier alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 15-Jul-2016
Science
Make way for ducklings; they’re smarter than you thought

While the brain’s ability to deal with abstract properties -- including patterns of 'same' and 'different' -- has been demonstrated in animals with advanced intelligence after extensive training, researchers now show that newly hatched ducklings can distinguish same and different, too, without any training at all.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Jul-2016
Science
Is the Zika epidemic in Latin America at its peak?

In a Policy Forum, Neil Ferguson et al. analyze the current Zika epidemic in Latin America, suggesting that it may have already peaked.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Jul-2016
Science
Biodiversity has dropped below the suggested 'safe' threshold

Species 'intactness' has dropped below what one research group considers the safe limit across about 58% of Earth’s terrestrial surface, a new study reports.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Jul-2016
Science
Ancient skeletons change views on origins of farming

Several hunter-gatherer populations independently adopted farming in the Fertile Crescent during the Neolithic period, sowing the seeds of farming far and wide, a new analysis suggests.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Jul-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Ultrasound offers tool for blocking faulty vessels in placental disorder

Ultrasound waves may offer a new tool for splitting abnormal blood vessels in the placenta that affect some twin pregnancies, a new study shows in sheep.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Jul-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Distribution of fatty acids in the alpine grassland soils of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

As an important biomarker, fatty acids (FAs) have been extensively used to trace the origin of organic matter in soils and sediments. However, studies of the distribution and abundance of FAs in alpine grassland soils are still rare. A recent study published in SCIENCE CHINA earth sciences investigates, for the first time, the composition, distribution and source of FAs in alpine grassland soils of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, the highest plateau in the world, which contributes sediments to many large rivers in Asia.

The Chinese National Key Development Program for Basic Research (2014CB954003, 2015CB954201), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31370491, 41503073), National 1000 Young Talents Program and the "Strategic Priority Research Program -Climate

Contact: FENG XiaoJuan
xfeng@ibcas.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 13-Jul-2016
BMC Public Health
Chinese city migrant children buck obesity trend

Researchers at the University of Birmingham have found that the children of migrants to Chinese cities have lower rates of obesity than youngsters in more affluent established urban families.

Contact: Tony Moran
44-012-141-48254
University of Birmingham

Public Release: 12-Jul-2016
Science Bulletin
Borophene: A prospective extraordinary sodium anode material for sodium-based batteries

Recently, a research team from Hong Kong found that borophene is expected to be an excellent anode material for sodium-based batteries. This newly synthesized 2-D sheet of boron shows a theoretical capacity of as high as 1218 mAh·g–1, and more excitingly, a sodium diffusion energy barrier of as low as 0.0019 eV, which is expected to lead to a revolution in the rate capability of sodium-based batteries.

Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China

Contact: Tianshou Zhao
metzhao@ust.hk
Science China Press

Public Release: 12-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of rhesus monkeys participating in a gambling experiment finds that the monkeys made specific and coherent choices between gambles of different rewards, and economic decision theory helped predict the monkeys' choices, suggesting that primates may display stable beliefs, consistent preferences, and mild risk-seeking behavior.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Oil and gas development and groundwater contamination

Researchers estimate the impact of unconventional oil and gas development on groundwater in Colorado.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Primate tooth evolution and climate change

Two genetic mechanisms shaped the evolution of primate teeth during a time of climate change, a study finds.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Posttraumatic stress and gene expression in former child soldiers

Researchers report an association between childhood adversity and immune system gene expression in a low-income country.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain connectivity and stroke-induced behavioral impairment

A study suggests how changes in brain connectivity after stroke might lead to specific impairments.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Human infrastructure and wildlife

Half of the European continent and around 95% of the European Union is within 1.5 km and 8 km of a road or railway line, respectively, and these density levels affect wildlife, a study finds.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reading-related brain activity in preschoolers

Young children with limited knowledge of letters show adult-like patterns of neural activity in reading-related brain areas, a study finds.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 101-125 out of 536 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]