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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 565 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Nature
Lanosterol revealed clues for cataract prevention and treatment

On July 30, 2015, researchers from Sichuan University, Sun Yat-sen University, University of California, BGI, etc, reported the latest study on congenitalcataracts. The finding, published on Nature, identifies lanosterol as a key molecule in the prevention of lens protein aggregation and points to a novel strategy for cataract prevention and treatment.

Contact: Aizhu Wang
wangaizhu@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Inflammation worsens hearing loss caused by common antibiotic

The very illness that the antibiotic aminoglycoside treats—severe inflammation—exacerbates the drug’s known side effect of permanent hearing loss, a new study in mice shows. Researchers say that patients treated with this drug, including almost half a million infants in U.S. hospitals each year, may be at greater risk of deafness than previously thought.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Chinese Optics Letters
20 Mbit/s wireless communication demonstration using terahertz quantum devices

With a THz QCL and a frequency well-matched THz QWP set up for THz communication system, a data signal transmitted over a 2.2 m and data rate as high as 20Mbps was realized, and photocurrent extraction circuit was improved by Prof. Juncheng Cao's research group, from Key Laboratory of Terahertz Solid-State Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, based on their previous work. It is reported in Chinese Optics Letters, Vol. 13, No. 8, 2015.

Contact: Xiaofeng Wang
wxf@siom.ac.cn
Chinese Laser Press

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Global Change Biology
Drivers of temporal changes in temperate forest plant diversity

Together with an international team an ecologist of Jena University (Germany) presents a detailed biodiversity analysis for temperate forests in Europe

Contact: Dr. Markus Bernhardt-Römermann
markus.bernhardt@uni-jena.de
0049-364-194-9435
Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Science Translational Medicine
microRNA links inflammation and liver cancer in feedback loop

Researchers have uncovered a feedback loop involving a microRNA that enables persistent inflammatory signaling to drive metastasis in liver cancer. The study hints that boosting the microRNA, a small RNA that fine-tunes gene expression, offers a potential strategy for arresting liver cancer metastasis.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
The provision of nutrients after acute spinal cord injury: The implications of feast and famine

Guidelines for the management of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) have recommended targeting a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of > 85-90 mmHg for 7 days following a SCI. This guideline has been supported by limited evidence of benefit and is a substantial burden on healthcare resources.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
A novel role for an ancient organelle

Mitochondria not only provide cells with energy, they also play essential roles in cell signaling, differentiation, and survival. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally and are thought to impact expression of two-thirds of the human genome.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study profiling metabolites in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cancer cells identifies three metabolic subtypes of the cancer, with distinct disease progression outcomes and pharmacological sensitivities to various metabolic inhibitors.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Enhanced genome editing helps engineer T cells

Researchers report a genome editing strategy with enhanced efficiency for engineering human T cells. Despite recent advances in genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 tool, efficient and specific editing of human T cell genomes has remained a challenge.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate and childhood undernutrition

Although prior studies have demonstrated a correlation between climatic factors and childhood undernutrition, further studies based on primary data may be required to understand the relationship between climate change and nutrition. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the World Health Organization report malnutrition as one of the most significant impacts of climate change on human health.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Antibody against MERS

Researchers report the isolation of a potent human antibody against the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV). MERS is a severe infection of the lower respiratory tract caused by MERS-CoV, which is responsible for more than 1,300 human infections and 500 deaths since its discovery in 2012.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Scientific Reports
Research with bite

The Tyrannosaurus rex and its fellow theropod dinosaurs that rampage across the screen in movies like Jurassic World were successful predators partly due to a unique, deeply serrated tooth structure that allowed them to easily tear through the flesh and bone of other dinosaurs, says new research from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM).

Contact: Timothy Huang
timd_huang@yahoo.com
886-222-140-517
University of Toronto

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
JAMA
Rates of death, hospitalizations and expenditures decrease for medicare patients

Among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries age 65 years or older, all-cause mortality and hospitalization rates, along with inpatient expenditures per beneficiary, decreased from 1999 to 2013, according to a study in the July 28 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on Medicare and Medicaid at 50. There has also been a decrease in recent years in total hospitalizations and inpatient expenditures for the last 6 months of life.

Contact: Harlan M. Krumholz, M.D., S.M.
harlan.krumholz@yale.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
JAMA
Report examines medicare and medicaid programs at 50 years and challenges ahead

Although Medicare and Medicaid are playing a role in health care payment and delivery reform innovation, it will be difficult to enact large-scale program changes because of the conflicting priorities of beneficiaries, health practitioners and organizations, and policy makers, according to an article in the July 28 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on Medicare and Medicaid at 50.

Contact: Drew Altman, Ph.D.
amyj@kff.org
650-854-9400
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Jul-2015
Metagenome-wide association study on oral microbiome uncovered markers for RA

July 28, 2015, Shenzhen, China –Researchers from BGI, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, etc., reported the study on the oral and the gut microbiome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The results show that the gut and oral microbiome are involved in the pathophysiology and management of RA and provide indication for developing microbiome-assisted personalized treatments. The latest finding was published online today in Nature Medicine.

Contact: Azihu Wang
wangaizhu@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Science
New technique significantly improves conductivity in flexible material

In the race to produce optimal conductors, researchers have discovered a new technique that aligns sheets of layered carbon nanotubes along stretched fiber cores, creating a much more efficient – and yet flexible – conductive material. The potential of such material has wide implications, from improving pacemaker leads and light-emitting displays, to batteries and supercapacitors.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Science
Four-legged fossil suggests snakes evolved from burrowing ancestors

The discovery of a four-legged fossil of a snake hints that this suborder may have evolved from burrowing, rather than marine, ancestors. The unique four-legged specimen, found in Brazil’s Crato Formation, provides us with more insight into how these creatures transitioned into the sleek, slithering reptiles that we are familiar with – and often fearful of – today.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Science
What killed off the megafauna?

Rapid phases of warming climate played a greater role in the extinction of megafauna in the Late Pleistocene than did human activity, a new study shows. It helps to inform the debate about what killed off megafaunal species (or animals over 100 pounds) during the last glacial period – a subject that is highly debated, with some scientists pointing to human hunting and land alteration, and others to climate change.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Science
Genetic data informs how Native American ancestors entered Americas

Using genetic data from ancient and modern individuals, researchers have provided one of the clearest pictures yet of how and when the ancestors of present-day Native Americans entered the Americas, suggesting they did so as a single wave – not in multiple waves, as some have thought.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Applied Physics Letters
An easy, scalable and direct method for synthesizing graphene in silicon microelectronics

Now researchers from Korea University, in Seoul, have developed an easy and microelectronics-compatible method to grow graphene and have successfully synthesized wafer-scale (four inches in diameter), high-quality, multi-layer graphene on silicon substrates. The method is based on an ion implantation technique, a process in which ions are accelerated under an electrical field and smashed into a semiconductor. The impacting ions change the physical, chemical or electrical properties of the semiconductor.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
BioScience
Readiness of America's biology teachers questioned

Data spanning 1987 to 2007 show changing demographics among public high school biology teachers. The workforce has become less experienced and has been destabilized by turnover, and biology teachers are more likely than other science teachers to work outside of their discipline.

National Science Foundation, no. DUE-1035451

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Surprise: immune cell diversity linked to greater susceptibility to infection

Greater diversity of natural killer cells may make some people more vulnerable to HIV-1 and potentially other viral infections, researchers say. The findings raise the possibility of harnessing natural killer cell diversity to predict future susceptibility to disease. Part of the body’s first line of immune defense, known as innate immunity, natural killer cells are ready assassins that rapidly take down virus-infected and tumor cells.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
PolyU establishes Hong Kong’s first breast milk nutrient database

The Laboratory for Infant & Child Nutrition set up by the Food Safety and Technology Research Centre (FSTRC) of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has established Hong Kong’s first breast milk nutrient database.

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Contact: Janice Chan
852-276-65104
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

In a study of 36 infants ages 5 to 7 months, researchers report that the occipital cortex, a brain area that governs visual perception, responds when a visual stimulus unexpectedly does not appear, even after only a couple of minutes of learning, suggesting that young infants can use their expectations about the world to rapidly shape their developing brain.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Benefits of high school music training

A study suggests that music training in high school might help improve the brain’s responses to sound as well as auditory and linguistic skills among adolescents. Regular music training helps improve verbal memory and distinguish speech sounds amid ambient noise.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 101-125 out of 565 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]