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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 638 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Flight style of large, extinct birds

Model results suggest that an extinct bird with a 6.4-meter wingspan was likely capable of highly efficient gliding flight, according to a study. Bird flight ability depends on a balance between the bird’s body size and the lift forces that can be generated by its wings.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tonga provided 'interaction centers' for people in prehistoric Oceania

Stone tools imported during the last 1,000 years from far-away Fiji, Samoa, and the Society Islands reveal that the maritime empire of Tonga served as a hub through which prehistoric people exchanged products and political ideas, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mitochondrial DNA and human disease

Many healthy individuals carry mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with age-related diseases, a study finds. In human cells, DNA located in energy-generating structures called mitochondria can undergo mutations to form multiple DNA variants.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Electrical stimulation of fastigial nucleus and cellular apoptosis in injured region

Electrical stimulation of fastigial nucleus and cellular apoptosis in injured region

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Dental pulp stem cells promote the survival and regeneration of retinal cells after injury

Injury to the retina and optic nerve leads to irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and irreparable damage to their axons which ultimately leads to blindness. Providing a sustained source of neurotrophic growth factors is required to promote their survival and regeneration. Transplanted dental pulp stem cells secrete multiple growth factors which protect RGCs from death after optic nerve injury and promote regeneration of their axons.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
China’s hidden water footprint

China’s richest provinces have an outsized environmental impact on the country’s water-scarce regions, according to new research from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) and the University of Maryland.

Contact: Katherine Leitzell
leitzell@iiasa.ac.at
43-067-683-807-316
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Visualization of peripheral nerve regeneration

A variety of treatments for repairing the peripheral nerve injuries have been developed. Monitoring the peripheral nerve regeneration process in vivo without invasion, however, is less reported. This article describes the treatment options for the peripheral nerve regeneration and compares the treatments suitable for nerve injuries. On the other hand, this article provides choices of imaging tools for visualizing the nerve regeneration in real-time. Using the appropriate imaging tool may help understand the process and mechanism of peripheral nerve regeneration under various treatments.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Gene therapy and the regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons

Gene therapy and the regeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 6-Jul-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
Perspective of the PandaX dark matter experiment

The PandaX experiment of China, which is located in the deepest underground laboratory, has released its technical design report recently. The full article will appear in SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy, 2014, 57(8): 1476-1494.

This project was supported by a 985 grant from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2010CB833005), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11055003), the Office of Science and Technolog

Contact: Ji XiangDong
xdji@sjtu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 4-Jul-2014
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Does 'free will' stem from brain noise?

Our ability to make choices — and sometimes mistakes — might arise from random fluctuations in the brain's background electrical noise, according to a recent study from the Center for Mind and Brain at the University of California, Davis.

National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 4-Jul-2014
Infection, Genetics and Evolution
Die-offs of band-tailed pigeons connected to newly discovered parasite

A new pathogen has been discovered by scientists investigating major die-offs of pigeons native to North America, according to studies led by the University of California, Davis, and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife, US Fish and Wildlife Service

Contact: Yvette Girard
yagirard@ucdavis.edu
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 4-Jul-2014
Science
Pulses used to date young stars

Researchers have used asteroseismology, or the study of stars’ oscillations, to identify young stars and their particular stages of evolution. Until now, the technique had only been used on old, main sequence (MS) stars that had started the nuclear fusion of hydrogen in their cores.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Jul-2014
Science
Impolite planet ignores host star’s partner

A newly-discovered exoplanet exhibits curious behavior, orbiting just one member of a pair of stars in a binary star system, researchers report, nearly ignoring the companion star.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Jul-2014
Science
People like doing, not thinking

We humans really don’t like being alone with our thoughts, according to a new study by Timothy Wilson and colleagues. With a series of 11 experiments, the researchers show that most people find it difficult to sit alone in a room with nothing to do but think for just six to 15 minutes, and that some people -- mostly males -- would even prefer to give themselves unpleasant electric shocks rather than complete this task.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Jul-2014
Science
Disposing of wastewater linked to Oklahoma earthquakes

Some of the recent surge in earthquake activity in central Oklahoma is likely a result of the disposal of wastewater generated during oil and gas extraction processes at a small number of highly-active state wells, a new study reports. Earthquakes can be induced by industrial processes.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Drug reduces asthma attacks, allergies

An experimental drug called quilizumab may reduce asthmatic and allergic symptoms in patients by lowering levels of an inflammatory protein called immunoglobulin type E (IgE). The early-stage clinical trials suggest that the drug could one day be an effective treatment option for the millions of people suffering from severe asthma or allergies.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Analysis of the Chinese facial profile: contour of the side face in Tu and Zang ethnic minorities

This study uses geometirc morphometric method to analyze the contour of the side face and its variations in Tu and Zang (Tibetan) ethnic minorities from Qinhai province. The forehead both witnesses small variations and the nose has large variation, and one can roughly set the males apart from the females. These similarities may reflect the common morphological features of the Chinese face. This study has been published on Chinese Science Bulletin (In Chinese), 2014, No.16.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (41102015), the Projects from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA05130102)

Contact: LI Haijun
Lindavy@163.com
Science China Press

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
JAMA
Drug everolimus does not improve overall survival in patients with advanced liver cancer

Despite strong preclinical data, the drug everolimus failed to improve overall survival in patients with advanced liver cancer, compared to placebo, according to a study in the July 2 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Katie Marquedant
KMarquedant@mgh.harvard.edu
617-726-0337
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
JAMA
Bone marrow transplantation shows potential for treating adults with severe sickle cell disease

Use of a lower intensity bone marrow transplantation method showed promising results among 30 patients (16-65 years of age) with severe sickle cell disease, according to a study in the July 2 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Krysten Carrera
krysten.carrera@nih.gov
301-435-8112
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 2-Jul-2014
Bulletin of the World Health Organization
Millions in need of HIV services will continue to be left out

Millions of people in need would benefit from HIV services in developing countries that are moving towards universal health coverage if these services were run more efficiently and integrated better into their health systems.

UNAIDS

Contact: Fiona Fleck
fleckf@who.int
41-227-911-897
Bulletin of the World Health Organization

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Surveying the metagenomics of coral-associated microbiomes

A large-scale metagenomics survey of coral reef-associated microbial communities demonstrates that the microbes’ taxonomic composition was most influenced by benthic macroorganisms such as corals and algae, whereas their metabolic specialization varied with local oceanographic conditions. Microbial communities influence the health of associated coral reefs, but the mechanisms that govern microbial community structure and gene flow are largely unknown.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Morphological evidence of Triceratops evolution

Triceratops skulls from Montana offer a glimpse of the morphological and evolutionary processes at work in late Cretaceous dinosaur species, according to a study. Researchers have debated whether morphological distinctions between Triceratops horridus and Triceratops prorsus specimens represented intra-species variation, sexual dimorphism, or characteristics of two separate species.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Abundance and distribution of ocean plastic debris

Plastic pollution extends over the entire surface of the global ocean but at concentrations less than predicted, suggesting an unknown sink for small plastic particles, according to a study. Mass production technologies for plastics emerged in the mid-1900s, followed by plastic waste accumulations in the world’s oceans.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mass spectrometry may help guide brain tumor surgery

Using a mass spectrometry-based technique to detect a tumor metabolite, researchers report that real-time diagnosis might help surgeons trace the margins of human brain tumors in the operating room. Surgical resection of tumors often requires diagnostic information, currently obtained through pathologists’ painstaking and time-consuming microscopic examination of biopsies.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Motivation and success

Having external, instrumental motives to succeed in addition to internal motives harms rather than helps persistence and performance, a study finds. Researchers have long distinguished between internal motivation—driven by internal passions to perform—and instrumental motivation—driven by external goals such as grades or promotions.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 101-125 out of 638 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]