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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 560 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 28-Aug-2015
Science
Imaging techniques set new standard for super-resolution in live cells

Scientists can now watch dynamic biological processes with unprecedented clarity in living cells using new imaging techniques developed by researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus. The new methods dramatically improve on the spatial resolution provided by structured illumination microscopy, one of the best imaging methods for seeing inside living cells.

Contact: Jim Keeley
keeleyj@hhmi.org
301-215-8858
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Public Release: 28-Aug-2015
Science
Improved microscopy technique reveals new insights into cell processes

Researchers have significantly extended the resolution of live-cell Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM), a type of microscopy that offers many benefits compared to other super resolution techniques. The results are already providing a much more detailed understanding of cell processes, and could have important implications for health research.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Aug-2015
Science
Life histories may explain songbird paradox

An explanation behind the long-standing question of why tropical songbirds have fewer offspring than temperate songbirds may lie in the life histories of the latitude-separated species.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Aug-2015
Science
Irrational mating choices could reform sexual selection theory

In the attempt to choose a mate, it’s no surprise that females will select the more 'attractive' of two males –- however a new study reveals that female túngara frogs are susceptible to the 'decoy' effect, where the introduction of a third, inferior option results in the female choosing the less attractive of the first two options.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Aug-2015
Science
Study aims to reproduce 100 published journal papers

Following one of the largest-scale scientific reproducibility investigations to date, a group of psychology researchers has reported results from an effort to replicate 100 recently published psychology studies; though they were able to successfully repeat the original experiments in most all cases, they were able to reproduce the original results in less than half, they report.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-Aug-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Blood test predicts relapse sooner in early-stage breast cancer patients

Monitoring circulating tumor DNA in blood from patients with early-stage breast cancer can accurately predict relapse about eight months before it can be detected by conventional methods in the clinic, according to a new study.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that colonization of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum by Burkholderia bacteria induces the amoeba to carry bacterial prey during spore formation and dispersal, and that colonized amoebae typically produce fewer spores in food-rich conditions but more spores in food-scarce conditions, compared with noncolonized amoebae, suggesting that Burkholderia can be beneficial and deleterious, depending on circumstances.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Estimating limits of wind power

Researchers report an estimate of the maximum rate at which wind farms can generate electricity.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How the human brain composes complex ideas

The human brain creates complex thoughts by flexibly combining the meanings of individual words, a study suggests.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Glaciation and Europe’s inland aquatic species

The limited biodiversity in Europe’s inland water systems reflects a relatively young pattern set in motion at the end of the last glaciation, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Visual orientation in dung beetles

Nocturnal and diurnal species of dung beetles use different nighttime celestial cues to roll dung along a straight line, according to a study. South African dung beetles, which sequester small balls of dung for food and breeding chambers, use celestial cues to roll dung along a straight line.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
JAMA
Delay in administration of adrenaline associated with decreased survival for children with in-hospital cardiac arrest

Among children with in-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial nonshockable heart rhythm who received epinephrine (adrenaline), delay in administration of epinephrine was associated with a decreased chance of 24-hour survival and survival to hospital discharge, according to a study in the Aug. 25 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Kelly Lawman
klawman@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7305
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
JAMA
Genetic mutations identified during remission may help predict risk of relapse, survival for leukemia patients

In preliminary research, the detection of persistent leukemia-associated genetic mutations in at least 5 percent of bone marrow cells in day 30 remission samples among adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia was associated with an increased risk of relapse and reduced overall survival, according to a study in the Aug. 25 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Diane Duke Williams
williamsdia@wustl.edu
314-286-0111
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Aug-2015
Anxiety in the workplace can lead to lower job performance

The effect of workplace anxiety on job performance is closely connected to the quality of relationships between employees, their bosses and their co-workers, according to a new study from the University of Toronto focusing on police officers.

Contact: Ken McGuffin
mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca
416-946-3818
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 21-Aug-2015
Science Bulletin
Modulation of the urban heat island by the tourism

The urban heat island (UHI) represents one of the most significant human impacts on the earth system. In recent decades, the number of the tourists has a remarkable increase in China and also other regions of the globe.Recently,researchers found that tourism can affect the UHI.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (41275089 and 41305071) ;National Basic Research Program of China (2012CB955604)

Contact: Zhang Jingyong
zjy@mail.iap.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 21-Aug-2015
Science
Discovery of trigger for bugs’ defences could lead to new antibiotics

Scientists have exposed a chink in the armour of disease-causing bugs, with a new discovery about a protein that controls bacterial defences.

Contact: Laura Gallagher
l.gallagher@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-48432
Imperial College London

Public Release: 21-Aug-2015
Science
Disagreement among experts over bioweapons threat

Amid continued difficulties around assessing bioweapons threats, especially given limited empirical data, Crystal Boddie and colleagues took another route to gauge their danger: the collective judgment of experts. In this Policy Forum, the researchers explain how they employed a Delphi Method study to query the beliefs and opinions of 59 experts in order to assess the bioweapons threat and the potential for misuse of scientific research toward bioweapons development.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Aug-2015
Science
Special issue: Forest health

Forests play an integral role on Earth, driving biodiversity, regulating the carbon cycle, providing resources, and much more. Yet, forest health is suffering in the face of natural and human-induced environmental changes. In a special issue, Science looks closer at how these changes are affecting forests around the world, from the luscious, diverse forests of the tropics, to the pristine, resilient boreal forests of the north.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Aug-2015
Science
Searching for ingredients of dark matter and dark energy

Two new reports advance efforts to identify components of dark matter and energy, which together comprise about 95% of the universe yet leave much to scientists’ imaginations. Both experiments illustrate how basic questions about the universe’s development can be addressed by laboratory-scale experiments.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Aug-2015
Science
Humans as predators: An unsustainable appetite for adults and carnivores

Humans are just one of many predators in this world, but a new study highlights how their intense tendency to target and kill adult prey, as well as other carnivores, sets them distinctly apart from other predators. As humans kill other species in their reproductive prime, there can be profound implications — including widespread extinction and restructuring of food webs and ecosystems—in both terrestrial and marine systems.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Aug-2015
New estimates show China's carbon emissions were less than previously thought

China's carbon emissions have been substantially over estimated by international agencies for more than 10 years, according to research co-led by the University of East Anglia.

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 20-Aug-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Obesity fuels breast cancer by transforming tissue microenvironment

Obesity drives breast cancer by enhancing the stiffness of mammary fat tissue, creating an environment that promotes tumor growth, a new study shows. The findings shed light on obesity’s complex link to breast cancer and also uncover potential risks for patients who undergo breast reconstruction using adipose or fat tissue after a mastectomy.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Aug-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences
Study shows mole cricket’s gait is distinctive with common insect in terrestrial locomotion

Mole cricket is a unique insect, it not only can dig and excavate under ground with its specialized foreleg, but also can achieve terrestrial locomotion. The latest study shows that mole cricket’s gait has unique characters in terrestrial locomotion. Unlike normal hexapods, mole cricket employs a special tripod gait in walking, in which the clumsy foreleg not as functional as common insects.

National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 50635030 and 51405341);Tianjin City High School Science & Technology Fund Planning Project (No. 20120432);Tianjin Research Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology (No. 15JCYBJC19300);Sci

Contact: ZHANG Yan
y.zhang@tust.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 19-Aug-2015
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Drinking coffee daily may improve survival in colon cancer patients

Regular consumption of caffeinated coffee may help prevent the return of colon cancer after treatment and improve the chances of a cure, according to a new, large study from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute that reported this striking association for the first time.

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 18-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Neural processing of gestures and sign language

A study suggests that sign language and gestures may be processed by different neural systems in the human brain.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 1-25 out of 560 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]