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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 534 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 28-Jul-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Could microbiome disruptions explain HIV-exposed babies’ poor health?

HIV infection in mothers can disrupt the development of the gut microbiome of HIV-exposed but uninfected babies, potentially explaining why these infants are more vulnerable to death and disease, researchers report in a new study.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

In a mouse model of allergic asthma, researchers found that galectin-1 (Gal-1), a sugar-binding protein, regulated inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in the lung airways by modulating the function and fate of eosinophil proinflammatory cells recruited to allergic airways, suggesting a potential application for Gal-1 in the control of allergic asthma.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Oxygen and animal evolution

Researchers report a model of oxygen levels on Earth before the emergence of animal life.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Menopause and biological aging

A study suggests a link between menopause and biological aging.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Early-life disease exposure, adult mortality, and reproductive success

A study fails to find significant associations between increased early-life disease exposure and increased adult mortality or reproductive success.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Land use and urban water treatment costs

Twentieth century land use changes in the watersheds where cities obtain their water increased water treatment costs by approximately 50% for almost one in three cities worldwide, a study finds.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Natural disasters, ethnic fractionalization, and armed conflict

A study suggests a link between climate-related disasters and the likelihood of ethnic conflict.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Laboratory technique recapitulates egg cell development

A technique that recapitulates the process of egg cell formation in a dish could have implications for reproductive biology and regenerative medicine, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tracking seabirds to monitor ocean winds

The flight paths of seabirds can be used to estimate the speed and direction of ocean surface winds at a finer scale than measurements using satellites or floating buoys, a study reports.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wild waterfowl and avian influenza

A study suggests that undiscovered mechanisms may prevent wild waterfowl from sustaining highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza viruses (AIV).

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
JAMA
Study compares cognitive outcomes for treatments of brain lesions

Among patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases, the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone, compared with SRS combined with whole brain radiotherapy, resulted in less cognitive deterioration at 3 months, according to a study appearing in the July 26 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Joe Dangor
dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
JAMA
Trends in late preterm, early term birth rates and association with clinician-initiated obstetric interventions

Between 2006 and 2014, late preterm and early term birth rates decreased in the United States and an association was observed between early term birth rates and decreasing clinician-initiated obstetric interventions, according to a study appearing in the July 26 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Jennifer Johnson
jennifer.johnson@emory.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Journal of Insect Science
Researchers discover how honey bees 'telescope' their abdomens

Honey bees are able to wiggle their abdomens in a variety of ways.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Jul-2016
Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports
Ancient faeces provides earliest evidence of infectious disease being carried on Silk Road

Intestinal parasites as well as goods were carried by travellers on iconic route, say researchers examining ancient latrine

Contact: Hui-Yuan Yeh
hyy23@cam.ac.uk
659-054-1179
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 22-Jul-2016
Science
A sweet example of human and wild animal mutualism

When honey-hunters in Mozambique call out to birds in the hopes that their feathered companions will lead them to honey, the birds, in fact, recognize and respond to these specialized calls, a new study confirms.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jul-2016
Science
A missing link in water modeling

A process that is largely overlooked in earth system models may shape large-scale soil evaporation and plant transpiration more than scientists thought, a new study suggests, helping quantify the global water cycle.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jul-2016
Science
Helpful bacteria evolved alongside hominid hosts

Gut bacteria in modern humans and apes are not simply acquired from the environment, a new study suggests, but instead coevolved for millions of years with hominids to help shape our immune systems.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jul-2016
Science
Lichen’s secret symbiotic threesome

Lichen is known as an organism that’s made up of two different species, a fungus and photosynthesizing symbiont, but now a new study reveals that a third species also contributes to this symbiotic relationship.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Tapping into behavioral economics to boost clinical trial participation

Behavioral economics may offer a powerful tool for improving patient enrollment in clinical trials, argue Eric VanEpps, Kevin Volpp, and Scott Halpern in this Focus.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Using 3D textile manufacturing methods and gene therapy techniques, researchers engineered anatomically shaped, functional cartilage capable of mediating controlled expression of anti-inflammatory molecules and providing mechanical functionality upon implantation, indicating a potential use for the engineered cartilage in total biological joint resurfacing therapies in osteoarthritis treatment.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Phylogeography and evolution

A series of articles from the Sackler Colloquium on In the Light of Evolution X: Comparative Phylogeography present recent developments in phylogeography-the study of the spatial distribution of genealogical lineages.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Beliefs, poverty, and academic achievement

Students who believe that intelligence is malleable can be shielded from some of the negative effects of poverty on academic achievement, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Testing the authenticity of nuclear warheads

Researchers report a potential method to authenticate undetonated nuclear warheads without revealing sensitive design-related information.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Lifespan changes in cognitive ability

A study explores lifespan changes in human cognitive ability.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
San Andreas tremors and low-frequency earthquakes

Small, deep earthquakes in the San Andreas Fault are most likely to occur when the Earth tide waxes, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 1-25 out of 534 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]