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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 684 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 ]

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
JAMA
Survey indicates willingness of general population to donate tissue samples to biobank for research

A survey of nearly 1,600 individuals found that the majority were willing to donate tissue samples and medical information to a biobank for research and that most were willing to donate using a blanket consent, according to a study in the January 27 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Tom Tomlinson, Ph.D.
Sarina.Gleason@cabs.msu.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
JAMA
Targeted biopsy technique associated with increased detection of high-risk prostate cancer, decreased detection of low-risk cancer

Among men undergoing biopsy for suspected prostate cancer, targeted magnetic resonance/ultrasound fusion biopsy, compared with a standard biopsy technique, was associated with increased detection of high-risk prostate cancer and decreased detection of low-risk prostate cancer, according to a study in the January 27 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Peter A. Pinto, M.D.
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

According to a study, electrocortical activity in Broca’s area of the brains of 16 people reading sentences during neurosurgery under local anesthesia correlated with the sound frequencies of the words being read, whether the words were read aloud or silently, suggesting that the subjective impression of hearing thoughts or text as an internal speech may reflect the fundamental role of sound in language generation.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Optical nanoscale antennas

According to a study, nanoscale antennas can enhance the rate of spontaneous emission of optical energy from semiconductors. Just as radio antennas extract electrical signals from electromagnetic waves, optical antennas can be used to extract optical energy from sources such as quantum dots, molecules, and semiconductors.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate and politics in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica

A paleoclimate record from the Cuenca Oriental, Mexico, suggests that an arid period between 500 and 1150 CE may have contributed to both the rise and fall of the city of Cantona, according to a study. Uncertainty regarding the climate history of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica has contributed to debate about the role of drought in the abandonment of many cities.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Effects of head injuries in historic Denmark

A study finds an increased risk of early death in men from medieval and early modern Denmark with cranial vault injuries and provides an estimate of the long-term health effects of traumatic brain injury in a historic population.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study reveals how a cancer-causing virus blocks human immune response

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of California at San Francisco have revealed how a type of cancer-causing virus outwits the human body's immune response. The discovery might help explain why some cancer therapies fail to treat certain cancers and might lead to more effective treatments.

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Hemin improves adipocyte morphology and function by enhancing proteins of regeneration

Obesity has escalated in every segment of the population including children, adolescences and adults. In obesity, impaired lipid and glucose metabolism are implicated in the conundrum of cardiometabolic complication. Heme-oxygenase is a cytoprotective enzyme that has been recently shown to improve glucose and lipid metabolism in diabetic, hypertensive and obese animals. Thus substances capable of enhancing heme-oxygenase may be explored as novel remedies against cardiometabolic complications arising from excessive adiposity.

This work was supported by a grant from the Heart & Stroke Foundation of Saskatchewan, Canada to Dr. Joseph Fomusi Ndisang.

Contact: Dr. Joseph Fomusi Ndisang
joseph.ndisang@usask.ca
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Science
Special Issue -- Rosetta Begins Its Comet Tale

This special issue of Science highlights new data from the Rosetta spacecraft, which is currently in close orbit around the Jupiter family comet known as 67P. The spacecraft, which receives funding from the European Space Agency, NASA, and other member states, dropped its lander, Philae, off on the surface of the comet in November -- an event that was celebrated in Science’s 2014 Breakthrough of the Year.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Science
Gamma-ray sources detected in large magellanic cloud

The High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) Collaboration has identified three sources of high-energy gamma rays in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) galaxy: a pulsar wind nebula, a supernova remnant, and a superbubble.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Science
Before tools, a human-like hand in hominins?

The first stone tools don’t appear in the archaeological record until about 2.6 million years ago, but researchers have discovered that Australopithecus africanus as well as other, younger hominins had human-like hands -- capable of precision grips, or “squeeze” gripping, with an opposable thumb -- as early as 3.2 million years ago.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Science
Chronic infection shortens lives and telomeres in birds

Great reed warblers with chronic and mild malaria infections have shorter lives and fewer offspring than uninfected birds, according to a new study by Muhammad Asghar and colleagues. Infected warblers also have significantly shorter telomeres, which are the protective end caps on chromosomes that gradually wear away over time.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Oxytocin improves social behavior in mice with autism

Olga Peñagarikano and colleagues show in a mouse model of autism that oxytocin can markedly improve social behavior, a benefit that can become long-lasting with early treatment. Oxytocin, a hormone that helps build social bonds and trust in animals, has generated intense interest as a potential treatment for autism spectrum disorder, but clinical trials so far have delivered mixed results.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
BioScience
Next-generation sequencing offers insight into how species adapt to climate change

Next-generation sequencing allows for the creation and analysis of vast amounts of data about populations and their responses to shifting environmental conditions, including climate change. These data can provide fine-scale information at the genomic level into populations’ adaptations to changing circumstances. Despite the potential usefulness of next-generation sequencing for environmental scientists, it is a costly tool, and funding has yet to equal the value that it may provide.

US National Science Foundation, US Department of Defense

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
703-517-1362
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Journal of Applied Physics
New Laser-patterning Technique turns metals into dupermaterials

By zapping ordinary metals with femtosecond laser pulses researchers from the University of Rochester in New York have created extraordinary new surfaces that efficiently absorb light, repel water and clean themselves. The multifunctional materials could find use in durable, low maintenance solar collectors and sensors.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
JAMA
Working collaboratively may help reduce medical errors

Medical students who worked in pairs were more accurate in diagnosing simulated patient cases compared to students who worked alone, according to a study in the January 20 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Juliane E. Kämmer, Ph.D.
kaemmer@mpib-berlin.mpg.de
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
JAMA
Hospitalization for pneumonia associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD)

Hospitalization with pneumonia in older adults was associated with an increased short-term and long-term risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), suggesting that pneumonia may be an important risk factor for CVD, according to a study in the January 20 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Sachin Yende, M.D., M.S.
zellnerwl@upmc.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
New hope for understanding sudden cardiac arrest

New biosciences research at the University of Kent could point the way to greater understanding of the heart mutations that cause sudden cardiac arrest.

Contact: Martin Herrema
M.J.Herrema@kent.ac.uk
01-227-823-581
University of Kent

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Venomous cone snails may use insulin to net prey

Some predatory cone snails might use insulin contained in their venom to induce low blood sugar in schools of swimming fish, slowing down and netting prey through metabolic manipulation, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Arid air and language tonality

Climatic conditions such as temperature and humidity that affect the performance of the vocal folds may constrain development of complex tones in language to warm, humid regions, according to a study. Dry air can decrease the precision of pitch and tone produced by the vocal folds of the larynx, possibly impairing production of precise tones that can convey meaning in some languages and possibly acting as a climatic constraint on language development.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions reductions in Indonesia

A recent moratorium on deforestation activities in Indonesia has reduced greenhouse gas emissions but not to a level sufficient to reach current targets, according to a study. In May 2011, Indonesia instituted a two-year ban on issuing new concession licenses for logging and conversion of primary forests and peat lands to oil palm or pulp and paper tree plantations.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Canine distemper and Serengeti lions

A study in Tanzania suggests that domestic dogs may have spread canine distemper virus (CDV) to Serengeti lions but that subsequent infection peaks may have been caused by other carnivore species. CDV typically infects domestic dogs, but a 1994 Tanzania epidemic resulted in the die-off of approximately 30% of lions in the Serengeti ecosystem.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
California’s changing forests

A study of forest vegetation trends in California finds a decrease in large trees, an increase in forest density, and an increased abundance of oaks relative to pines, indicating changes associated with increased regional water stress, forest fire suppression, and changes in land use.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Metrics of film significance

An analysis of networks of citations among more than 15,000 films listed in the Internet Movie Database may produce several automated metrics of a film’s significance, according to a study. Judgments regarding the significance and quality of creative works are often difficult to make.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of more than 5,000 Himalayan mountain climbing expeditions involving climbers from 56 countries finds that expeditions from countries with hierarchical cultures had more climbers reaching the summit, but also more climbers dying along the way, than expeditions from countries with weak hierarchical values, a finding that illustrates the benefits and risks of hierarchical culture in high-stakes group dynamics.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 1-25 out of 684 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 ]