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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 563 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Flight stability trade-offs in bumblebees

Bees laden with pollen on their hind legs may experience increased flight stability, but at the likely expense of maneuverability, according to a study. Because pollen and nectar loads carried by bumblebees can reach nearly half the insect’s weight, the placement of such loads on the bumblebee’s body can significantly affect the dynamics of flight.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
El Niño and salmon survival

Researchers report that the stability of Pacific salmon stocks has decreased in recent decades. Historically, changes in the survival of salmon populations in the northeast Pacific have been explained by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), a recurring pattern of changes in ocean conditions driven by El Niño-associated eastern Pacific warming.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tracing human contamination of streams

Human-specific bacterial indicators may serve as better indicators of fecal contamination in streams than ubiquitous bacteria, according to a study. Contamination of streams and rivers by fecal bacteria, commonly measured by levels of Escherichia coli, poses a significant health hazard, but identifying sources of bacteria is challenging, particularly in large watersheds that may have multiple sources.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cross-linguistic word order optimization

A study of 37 languages finds a consistent tendency to structure sentences so as to minimize the distance between words related by the syntax of each language. Among the purported universal features of language is the concept called dependency length minimization, a tendency to minimize the distance between syntactically related words in a sentence, such as the distance between a verb and a noun in a sentence with a subject and an object.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Water stress under carbon mitigation scenarios

Increased demand for food and bioenergy under carbon mitigation scenarios may increase water stress, according to a study. Because global climate change is projected to increase evapotranspiration, drought, and other water stresses, carbon emission mitigation has been seen as a pathway to ease water stress.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Adaptation to altitudes in Ethiopian highlanders

A study offers a potential explanation for the genetic adaptation to low oxygen previously identified among Ethiopian highlanders. Whole genome analysis of Ethiopian highlanders, who live in low oxygen conditions, has pinpointed genes linked to adaptation to hypoxia.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Greenhouse gas emissions in the Great Plains

Researchers report estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the United States Great Plains as far back as the late 19th century and suggest methods for reducing future emissions. The US Great Plains is a globally important agricultural production center, and consequently a significant source of GHG emissions.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that a subset of neurons in the hippocampus fire in response to a familiar image but not to different images of the same subject, and that people who are skilled at discriminating between similar images tend to have an increased number of highly selective neurons, suggesting that the specificity of human memories might depend on the selectivity of the neurons that encode these memories.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 1-Aug-2015
PLoS ONE
Half of the most popular news on Twitter is not covered by traditional news media sources

Half of the news that appears on Twitter as “trending topics” goes unmentioned in the traditional news media, and when both sources carry it, 60% of the stories appear first on the social network. Those are some of the conclusions of a study which analyzes the dissemination of news on Twitter compared with the traditional media.

Contact: Rubén Cuevas
rcuevas@it.uc3m.es
34-667-718-559
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
National League for Nursing Education Summit
UT Arlington College of Nursing earns coveted national Center of Excellence designation

UT Arlington's College of Nursing and Health Innovation has been named a Center of Excellence in Nursing Education by the National League for Nursing.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
A new perspective on autologous bone marrow cell therapy for treating spinal cord injury

Despite the surge in clinical trials, cell therapy for SCI remains in an iterative stage between bench and bedside, largely due to the lack of access to high quality, clinical grade stem cells with proven safety and efficacy records.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Science
North America's salamanders at risk of an epidemic from overseas

The international pet trade threatens to spread a deadly fungal infection to North America's rich wild salamander population and must be frozen, according to the authors of this Policy Forum. Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) is a highly virulent, often fatal fungus that infects salamanders, and there is no effective way to control it after it infects a wild population, say Tiffany Yap and colleagues.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Science
Bio-inspired robots jump on water

By studying water striders jump on water, Je-Sung Koh and colleagues have created a robot that can successfully launch itself from the surface of water. As the team watched the water strider jump on water surfaces using high-speed cameras, they noticed that the long legs accelerate gradually, so that the water surface doesn’t retreat too quickly and lose contact with the legs.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Science
Drought’s legacy on trees is worth modeling

Forests slow their growth for up to four years after severe drought, a period during which they are less able to act as carbon sinks, a new study reports. The study’s results suggest that current Earth system models should incorporate the impact of drought on forests in order to provide more accurate predictions of how drought will alter the global carbon cycle.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Science
Special issue: Philae results shed light on the nature Of comets

During the first ever landing of a probe on a comet, the world held its breath as Philae survived a bouncy landing on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 12, 2014. This special issue of Science highlights seven new studies that delve further into the data that has been transmitted back by Philae.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Nature
Lanosterol revealed clues for cataract prevention and treatment

On July 30, 2015, researchers from Sichuan University, Sun Yat-sen University, University of California, BGI, etc, reported the latest study on congenitalcataracts. The finding, published on Nature, identifies lanosterol as a key molecule in the prevention of lens protein aggregation and points to a novel strategy for cataract prevention and treatment.

Contact: Aizhu Wang
wangaizhu@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Inflammation worsens hearing loss caused by common antibiotic

The very illness that the antibiotic aminoglycoside treats—severe inflammation—exacerbates the drug’s known side effect of permanent hearing loss, a new study in mice shows. Researchers say that patients treated with this drug, including almost half a million infants in U.S. hospitals each year, may be at greater risk of deafness than previously thought.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Chinese Optics Letters
20 Mbit/s wireless communication demonstration using terahertz quantum devices

With a THz QCL and a frequency well-matched THz QWP set up for THz communication system, a data signal transmitted over a 2.2 m and data rate as high as 20Mbps was realized, and photocurrent extraction circuit was improved by Prof. Juncheng Cao's research group, from Key Laboratory of Terahertz Solid-State Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, based on their previous work. It is reported in Chinese Optics Letters, Vol. 13, No. 8, 2015.

Contact: Xiaofeng Wang
wxf@siom.ac.cn
Chinese Laser Press

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Global Change Biology
Drivers of temporal changes in temperate forest plant diversity

Together with an international team an ecologist of Jena University (Germany) presents a detailed biodiversity analysis for temperate forests in Europe

Contact: Dr. Markus Bernhardt-Römermann
markus.bernhardt@uni-jena.de
0049-364-194-9435
Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Science Translational Medicine
microRNA links inflammation and liver cancer in feedback loop

Researchers have uncovered a feedback loop involving a microRNA that enables persistent inflammatory signaling to drive metastasis in liver cancer. The study hints that boosting the microRNA, a small RNA that fine-tunes gene expression, offers a potential strategy for arresting liver cancer metastasis.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
The provision of nutrients after acute spinal cord injury: The implications of feast and famine

Guidelines for the management of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) have recommended targeting a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of > 85-90 mmHg for 7 days following a SCI. This guideline has been supported by limited evidence of benefit and is a substantial burden on healthcare resources.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Neural Regeneration Research
A novel role for an ancient organelle

Mitochondria not only provide cells with energy, they also play essential roles in cell signaling, differentiation, and survival. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally and are thought to impact expression of two-thirds of the human genome.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study profiling metabolites in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cancer cells identifies three metabolic subtypes of the cancer, with distinct disease progression outcomes and pharmacological sensitivities to various metabolic inhibitors.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Enhanced genome editing helps engineer T cells

Researchers report a genome editing strategy with enhanced efficiency for engineering human T cells. Despite recent advances in genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 tool, efficient and specific editing of human T cell genomes has remained a challenge.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate and childhood undernutrition

Although prior studies have demonstrated a correlation between climatic factors and childhood undernutrition, further studies based on primary data may be required to understand the relationship between climate change and nutrition. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the World Health Organization report malnutrition as one of the most significant impacts of climate change on human health.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 1-25 out of 563 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]