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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 703 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Tea and citrus products could lower ovarian cancer risk, new UEA research finds

Tea and citrus fruits and juices are associated with a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).

Contact: Laura Potts
laura.potts@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-93007
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Prize-winning essay -- How neural circuits control skilled behaviors

Reaching out to catch a ball may seem a simple move, but it actually requires motor neuron circuits to fire in a carefully coordinated way, course correcting if the arm isn’t on track to reach the target. For this to happen, motor neurons cannot fire in a single burst; instead, their activity must be continually adjusted as the arm extends toward its mark.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Earth’s Animals Had to Wait for Air

Did the appearance of animal life on Earth approximately 700 to 800 million years ago simply stem from genetic and developmental innovations? Or did the planet’s environment play a significant role in its timing?

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Multiple interventions needed to stop Ebola’s spread in West Africa

Without a more concerted effort to isolate Ebola cases at hospitals, quarantine patients’ contacts, and implement sanitary funeral practices in Liberia, where the 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak has hit the hardest, the virus will continue to spread, researchers say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Crossbred mice reveal genetic influence on Ebola outcome

Working under stringent biosafety conditions, researchers have identified a line of laboratory mice that respond to Ebola virus with a range of symptoms -- from fatal hemorrhagic fever to complete resistance -- like humans do. Their results suggest that genetic makeup plays a significant role in determining disease outcome, and their mouse model of the disease may help to screen candidate therapeutics and vaccines.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Science
Asian fungus threatens world’s salamanders and newts

This study by An Martel and colleagues highlights the chytrid fungus known as Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans, which recently caused rapid declines in populations of European fire salamanders. The researchers first studied 35 species of amphibians and found that only salamanders and newts were susceptible to the pathogen.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Autophagy in 1 hour of ATP after neuronal damage: ATP neuroprotection against apoptosis

Autophagy in 1 hour of ATP after neuronal damage: ATP neuroprotection against apoptosis.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Damage of hippocampal neurons during chronic alcoholism

Damage of hippocampal neurons during chronic alcoholism.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
New synthetic antidote for blood thinners

A new drug made out of synthetic polymers can stop the excess bleeding caused by a class of blood thinning drugs called heparins, commonly given to patients to prevent blood clotting during major surgeries. Heparin-based anticoagulants can also cause bleeding complications, making it necessary for physicians to administer antidotes in some circumstances.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA)
Why Some Butterflies Sound like Ants

A team of scientists from the University of Turin in Italy have been looking at how the would-be nest crashers also use sound as a protective countermeasure -- warping ant "words" to suit their own twisted tastes.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
001-240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Ischemic tolerance as a novel strategy for diabetic retinopathy treatment

Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of acquired blindness, and the most common ischemic disorder of the retina. Instead of a pharmacological or surgical approach, researchers have used a strategy of ischemic tolerance induction which provides a robust neuroprotection against retinal diabetic damage. These results suggest that ischemic tolerance could constitute a fertile avenue for the development of new therapeutic strategies in diabetic retinopathy treatment.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study finds that members of the Amazonian Yanomamö tribe who have jointly killed opponents can come from different villages and patrilineal lines, and are likely to later live near each other and unite via marriage alliances, suggesting ties in coalitionary aggression that distinguish human social structure from that of chimpanzees.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Unconscious processing of social cues by infants

Human ability to unconsciously detect emotion and direction of focus by viewing a person’s eye whites, or sclerae, is present in infancy, according to a study. Large, visible sclerae are unique to humans and can communicate emotions such as fear or indicate the direction of focus.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Insect repellent mode of action

DEET, a common synthetic insect repellent, repels mosquitoes by activating odorant receptors in mosquito antennae, according to a study. Formulating insect repellents that replicate the effectiveness of DEET has been challenging because DEET’s mode of action is not well-understood.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The early chimp gets the fig

According to a study, chimpanzees can plan their nightly nest locations and departure times to ensure access to ephemeral fruits such as figs, suggesting a future-oriented strategy that may help secure access to scarce high-energy food. Energy demands of large brains in primates necessitate a high-energy food supply.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Oil fallout following the Deepwater Horizon spill

Much of the approximately 2 million barrels of oil released into underwater lateral plumes during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon incident may have settled on the ocean floor, according to a study. Following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, around 2 million barrels of oil, out of the 5 million barrels estimated to have been released, remained trapped within deep lateral plumes.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Modeling human population dynamics

Population control measures are unlikely to have a large impact on global human population size in the next century, a study suggests. Population control is a frequently proposed solution to increasing natural resource consumption and ecosystem erosion.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Revival of 700-year-old viral genetic material

A reconstituted viral genome from 700-year-old caribou feces frozen within an ice patch in the subarctic displayed the ability to infect laboratory plants, according to a study. Ancient viral genetic material can illuminate viral evolution, but intact samples are rarely isolated from the environment.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Unconscious information and decision-making

Information obtained unconsciously might influence decision-making accuracy, according to a study. Previous studies have suggested that unconsciously-processed stimuli may influence behavior.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Circadian gene expression

The rhythmic effects of the circadian clock on gene transcription may be more widespread than previously thought, according to a study. Circadian clocks drive biological processes including sleep, body temperature, and hormone levels, and research suggests that the processes may be regulated by circadian-controlled gene transcription.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
ASN Kidney Week 2014
Many home blood pressure monitors may be inaccurate

Home blood pressure monitors may be inaccurate in up to 15% of patients, according to a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2014 November 11¬–16 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA.

Contact: Kurtis Pivert
kpivert@asn-online.org
202-699-0238
American Society of Nephrology

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Selective CDK inhibitors: promising candidates for future clinical traumatic brain injury trials

Selective CDK inhibitors: promising candidates for future clinical traumatic brain injury trials.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Chinese Optics Letters
Down-Looking Synthetic Aperture Imaging Ladar(SAIL) Overcomes Atmospheric Interference

A down-looking synthetic aperture imaging ladar proposed by professor Jianfeng Sun’s research group, from Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has overcome the difficulties. This study aims to conduct the outdoor verification experiments. It is reported in Chinese Optics Letters Volume 12, No.11, 2014.

Contact: Xiaofeng Wang
wxf@siom.ac.cn
Chinese Laser Press

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Science
Growing pains for thousand talents

In 2008, the Chinese government initiated a new program for attracting foreign talent to China: the so-called “Thousand Talents” plan, designed to recruit up to 2,000 leading scientists, entrepreneurs, and financial experts to China over five to ten years. Chinese universities help recruit the scholars and are sometimes given monetary incentives, portions of which are to go to the recruited scholar’s salary while the rest is distributed to other faculty.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Science
Ferns’ sex ratio determined by cooperation

A community of individual fern plants maintains an optimal balance of males and females through a complex chemical communication system, according to a new study by Junmu Tanaka and colleagues. In the Japanese climbing fern, the plant hormone gibberellin encourages the development of male organs.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 1-25 out of 703 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]