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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 569 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 3-Jul-2015
Science
Human antibody blocks dengue virus in mice

Researchers have discovered that a human antibody specific to dengue virus serotype 2, called 2D22, protects mice from a lethal form of the virus -- and they suggest that the site where 2D22 binds to the virus could represent a potential vaccine target.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Jul-2015
Science
Miniature landscapes show how hills and valleys form

Detailed tabletop experiments are helping researchers understand how Earth’s landscapes erode to form networks of hills and valleys. Their findings, which highlight a balance between processes that send sediments down hills and those that wash them out of valleys, might also help researchers predict how climate change could transform landscapes in the future.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Jul-2015
Science
Be square, seahorse; it has mechanical advantages

The seahorse tail is square because this shape is better at resisting damage and at grasping than a circular tail would be, a new engineering study shows. Insights gleaned from the study could inspire new armor and advances in robotics, the authors say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Jul-2015
Science
Unexpected enzyme may resurrect roses’ fading scents

Researchers working with roses have identified a long-sought enzyme, known as RhNUDX1, which plays a key role in producing the flowers’ sweet fragrances. These ornamental plants, which provide essential oils for perfumes and cosmetics, have been bred mostly for their visual traits, and their once-strong scents have faded over the generations.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
PLoS ONE
Hydroelectric dams drastically reduce tropical forest biodiversity

Widely hailed as ‘green’ sources of renewable energy, hydroelectric dams have been built worldwide at an unprecedented scale. But research from the University of East Anglia reveals that these major infrastructure projects are far from environmentally friendly.

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Narcolepsy triggered by antibodies against viral protein

In the wake of the swine flu outbreak that rippled worldwide in 2009, a flu vaccine used in Europe led to an unusual spike in narcolepsy. A new study comparing this vaccine, Pandemrix®, to another, differently manufactured flu vaccine, Focetria®, pins down a viral protein present in larger quantities in the former that unwittingly mimicked a sleep-related receptor in the brain, in turn triggering destructive antibodies in individuals predisposed to narcolepsy.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Science Bulletin
Researchers disclosed the macroscopic Brownian motion phenomenon of self-powered liquid metal motors

The classical Brownian motion, resulted from microscopic molecule collisions, has been found for more than one hundred years. Recently, researchers disclosed the macroscopic Brownian motion phenomenon of the interiorly driven liquid metal tiny motors in alkaline solution. The driving force comes from propulsions of the hydrogen bubbles generated from bottom of the millimeter scale tiny motors contacting the substrate. The established optical image contrast platform distinguishes clearly the running trajectory of such hydrogen gas stream.

Research Funding of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. KGZD-EW-T04-4)

Contact: LIU Jing
jliu@mail.ipc.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study of malaria records in two villages in Senegal over more than 15 years finds that climate likely plays a role in promoting malaria transmission in areas of intermittent malaria transmission, but that the effects of climate in areas of perennial, endemic transmission are buffered by developed immunity, a result that may improve malaria forecasting in endemic regions.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reactive nitrogen fluxes through China

Although fluxes of reactive nitrogen in China increased dramatically between 1980 and 2010, technical improvements and policy regulations may lead to no net increase or a possible decline in the future, according to a study.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Combating visceral leishmaniasis in India

A study cautions against the continued use of the insecticide DDT in programs to combat visceral leishmaniasis. Visceral leishmaniasis, or kala-azar, is a parasitic disease transmitted to humans by infected female sand flies. Janet Hemingway, Pradeep Das, and colleagues provide evidence needed to improve the struggling leishmaniasis elimination program in India.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Role of semantic knowledge in reading aloud

Researchers report evidence for the division of labor between different cognitive processes that are active while reading aloud. The integration of cognitive models of reading with neural data is currently limited. Paul Hoffman and colleagues used a distortion-corrected fMRI protocol to examine activation in the brains of 27 participants as the participants read individual words aloud.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Antibodies help prevent and treat MERS in mouse model

Researchers report a mouse model of MERS and human-compatible antibodies that can help prevent and treat viral infection in the model. Since September 2012, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has sickened more than 1,100 people, with a death toll higher than 400.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nocturnal redolence of petunias

A study uncovers the genetic control of nocturnal scent emission in petunia flowers. The swan-white flowers of common garden petunias (Petunia hybrida cv. Mitchell) turn fragrant at night, luring nocturnal pollinators with a scent laden with volatile organic compounds.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cambrian armored worm

Differentiated limbs on a fossil ancestor of the velvet worm from the Cambrian period illuminate the diversity of lifestyles and body plans in an ancient paleoecological niche, according to a study. Modern velvet worms are morphologically uniform, but fossil ancestors display a wide variety of forms, including lobopodians, which resemble worms but exhibit specialized appendages.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancestry of Brazilians

Admixture of European, African, and Native American populations throughout Brazil’s history has shaped the genetic characteristics of the modern population, according to a study. The ancestry of the population of Brazil includes various geographical sources, presenting an opportunity to study the genetic characteristics of population admixture.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cross-cultural features of music

Aspects of music that are shared across cultures may indicate the social and cultural origins of music, according to a study. Music is present in all cultures, yet disagreement persists regarding whether universal aspects of music exist and what such universal cross-cultural features might entail.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Groundwater exploitation and food supply

Overexploitation of groundwater aquifers in the United States may affect local food production with potential implications for domestic and international consumers, according to a study. Groundwater exploitation in the High Plains, Mississippi Embayment, and Central Valley aquifers intensified between 2000 and 2008, leading to increasingly unsustainable water withdrawals.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Analyzing fingerprint recognition accuracy

A longitudinal study examines the persistence of human fingerprints over time. The unique and persistent pattern of ridges on human fingers has long been considered admissible forensic evidence in the United States. However, belief in the persistence of human finger ridge patterns is largely based on evidence from case studies.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Science Bulletin
Synthetic immunity to break down the bottleneck of cancer immunotherapy

Evidence suggests that further advances depend on an effective strategy for coping with cancer heterogeneity and dynamics. A synthetic immunity (SI) strategy is proposed to achieve this goal.

government funds of Shenzhen, China

Contact: Zhi-Ying Chen
zy.chen1@siat.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy
How to better use the COMPASS navigation message

COMPASS is our national self-developing satellite navigation system, which has poisoning, timing and communication function. A recent study has explored the characteristics and usage of COMPASS navigation message, which is published on the Sci Sin-Phys Mech Astron, 2015, vol. 45, issue 7.

National Natural Science Foundation, China (No.41174027) and National 863 Project, China (No.2013AA122402)

Contact: LIU Li
lliu@shao.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
JAMA Pediatrics
Estimates of childhood, youth exposure to violence, crime and abuse

More than a third of children and teens 17 and younger experienced a physical assault, primarily at the hands of siblings and peers, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.

Contact: David Finkelhor, Ph.D.
erika.mantz@unh.edu
603-862-1567
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
JAMA Internal Medicine
Neighborhood environments and risk for type 2 diabetes

Neighborhood resources to support greater physical activity and, to a lesser extent, healthy diets appear to be associated with a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes, although the results vary by the method of measurement used, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Contact: Paul J. Christine,M.P.H.
ltgnagey@umich.edu
734-647-1841
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Watershed science calls for integrated research methods

A watershed is a basic unit of the land-surface system. Watershed science is an Earth system science practiced on a watershed scale, which confronts fundamentally methodological challenges. Therefore, operational methods to combine hard and soft integrations and capture all aspects of both natural and human systems will contribute to the maturation of watershed science and to a methodology that can be used throughout land-surface systems science.

the National Natural Science Foundation of China (91225302, 91425303)

Contact: Xin Li
lixin@lzb.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Smoother signals sent through optical fibers

Researchers have figured out a way to pump more light farther down an optical fiber, offering engineers a potential solution to the so-called “capacity crunch” that threatens to limit bandwidth on the Web. These findings, which represent a step toward a faster and vaster Internet, show that silica fibers -- the hair-like wires that form the basis of fiber-optic communication -- can handle a lot more data than researchers had originally estimated.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Heat-tolerant genes may rescue corals, study suggests

The reef-building coral, Acropora millepora, can pass its tolerance for heat on to the next generation via its DNA, according to a new study. This discovery suggests that some corals take advantage of an evolutionary process known as “genetic rescue,” and that such species might have an easier time adapting to global warming than researchers had imagined.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 1-25 out of 569 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]