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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 616 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
JAMA
Medication helps improve vision for patients with neurological disorder

In patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension and mild vision loss, the use of the drug acetazolamide, along with a low-sodium weight-reduction diet, resulted in modest improvement in vision, compared with diet alone, according to a study in the April 23/30 issue of JAMA, a neurology theme issue.


Contact: Michael Wall, M.D.
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
JAMA
Conservative management of vascular abnormality in brain associated with better outcomes

Patients with arteriovenous malformations (abnormal connection between arteries and veins) in the brain that have not ruptured had a lower risk of stroke or death for up to 12 years if they received conservative management of the condition compared to an interventional treatment, according to a study in the April 23/30 issue of JAMA, a neurology theme issue.


Contact: Rustam Al-Shahi Salman, Ph.D.
jen.middleton@ed.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Short-term environmental enrichment exposure induces maturity of newborn neurons

Many studies have shown that exposure to environmental enrichment can induce neurogenesis of the hippocampal region, thus improving learning and memory.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Tap water from ancient Rome may have contained up to 100 times more lead than local spring waters, and lead pipes in the ancient city’s plumbing likely increased the amount of lead in drinking water by two orders of magnitude above the natural background, though the concentrations of lead in the water supply were likely insufficient to pose human health risks.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain size, diet, and evolution of self-control

According to a study, species with larger brains may have more self-control than species with smaller brains, and feeding ecology may have acted as a selective pressure that favored self-control. Several hypotheses propose to explain the forces that shape such an example of cognitive evolution, but few have been rigorously tested.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Role of households in MRSA spread

Households may play a crucial role in the persistence and spread of an epidemic strain of MRSA called USA300, a study suggests. Since the late 1990s, USA300, a strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), has spread across the United States, contributing to an epidemic of community-associated MRSA.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Symbol addition by monkeys

In a study of rhesus macaque monkeys trained to recognize 26 different symbols and associate them with different reward amounts, the monkeys demonstrated the ability to not only differentiate between the symbols but also to add the values of two symbols at a time. Researchers have demonstrated that animals can estimate numbers of items, but it is unclear how they do so.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes act as a carrier for nerve growth factor

In recent years, there are growing studies concerning the use of different carrier materials for sustained-release and controlled-release of nerve growth factor in neuroscience research.


Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
The Journal of Cell Biology
Why alcoholism saps muscle strength

Muscle weakness is a common symptom of both long-time alcoholics and patients with mitochondrial disease. Now researchers have found a common link: mitochondria that are unable to self-repair. The results will be published online April 21 in The Journal of Cell Biology. The link to self-repair provides researchers both a new way to diagnose mitochondrial disease, and a new drug target.


Contact: Edyta Zielinska
edyta.zielinska@jefferson.edu
215-955-5291
Thomas Jefferson University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Experimental Biology and Medicine
Live cell imaging reveals distinct alterations of subcellular glutathione potentials

Glutathione is the most abundant cellular redox buffer that both protects cells from oxidative damage and mediates cellular signaling. Perturbation of glutathione balance has been associated with tumorigenesis; however, due to analytical limitations, the underlying mechanisms behind this relationship are poorly understood. Utilizing a recently developed genetically encoded redox-sensitive probe has revealed differentially regulated redox environments within cellular compartments, and evidence of the contributory role of the p53 protein in supporting cytosolic redox poise.


NIH, R33-CA137719

Contact: Vladimir L. Kolossov
viadimer@illinois.edu
Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Science
Turning off depression in the brain

Previous studies have shown that when the currents of cation channels are elevated in mice, dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of their brains can become hyperactive and, in turn, the rodents become depressed.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Science
Study finds global changes in biodiversity, not loss

Although human activity has accelerated the rate of species’ extinction around the world, there has not been a consistent loss of biodiversity across marine and terrestrial habitats, researchers say. Instead, it’s the composition of species that has been systematically changing from ecosystem to ecosystem, according to a new study.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Science
A distant planet rather like Earth

Scientists scouring the sky have found a planet roughly Earth's size that could theoretically host liquid water, a new study reports. This is a landmark on the road to discovering habitable planets orbiting stars besides our Sun.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Science
Comparing methylation maps of archaic and modern humans

Sequencing ancient DNA has helped scientists learn about the genetic changes that separate modern humans from their closest extinct relatives, Neandertals and Denisovans, and now, according to a new report, scientists better understand how epigenetics influenced differences among these groups, too.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Oral drug stops early neasles infection in its tracks

Measles is making a comeback. Despite the existence of an effective vaccine for the highly-infectious respiratory virus, the recent decline in vaccination compliance in some countries has led to an increase in sporadic outbreaks of the disease. Now, researchers have developed an oral drug that blocks a measles-like virus during the early stages of infection in ferrets.


Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Chinese Optics Letters
Imaging quality of OCT improved

A new iterative algorithm is proposed to raise the imaging quality of Fourier domain OCT technology.


Contact: Xiaofeng Wang
wxf@siom.ac.cn
Chinese Laser Press

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
JAMA
Thyroid disease risk varies among blacks, Asians, and whites

An analysis that included active military personnel finds that the rate of the thyroid disorder Graves disease is more common among blacks and Asian/Pacific Islanders compared with whites, according to a study in the April 16 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Donald S. A. McLeod, F.R.A.C.P., M.P.H.
donald.mcleod@qimrberghofer.edu.au
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
JAMA
Mothers with higher BMI have increased risk of stillbirth, infant death

Higher maternal body mass index (BMI) before or in early pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of fetal death, stillbirth, and infant death, with women who are severely obese having the greatest risk of these outcomes from their pregnancy, according to a study in the April 16 issue of JAMA.


Contact: Dagfinn Aune, M.S.,
d.aune@imperial.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Science China:Life Sciences
How can the plants of different functional groups adapt to tropical karst habitat?

Investigation of the eco-physiological mechanisms of plant adaptation to the tropical karst habitat can contribute important knowledge to the restoration of desertified kart lands. The present study found that evergreen trees, deciduous trees and woody lianas co-occurring in tropical karst forest differed significantly in their drought tolerance and water use, and which are very important for the maintaining of water balance in a karst forest ecosystem. This study has been published on SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences(In Chinese), 2014, No.3.


National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 31170399 and 31100291). Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology (Grant No. 2006CB403207).Guang Xi University Scientific Foundation (Grant No. XDZ120929)

Contact: CAO Kunfang
kunfangcao@gxu.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study finds that glaciers in Scotland during the Younger Dryas cool period retreated rather than grew, a finding attributed to changes in North Atlantic circulation during the Younger Dryas that led to warm summers and early deglaciation in Scotland.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Drought increases tree mortality in the Amazon

A study finds that drought significantly increases fire-related tree mortality in the Amazon rainforest. Drought poses a significant threat to the Amazon due to the increased risk of severe wildfire during dry years. Recent droughts in 2007 and 2010 led to wildfires burning 12% and 5% of the Amazon, respectively.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic analysis reveals evolution of flesh-eating bacteria

Researchers have determined the evolutionary path that turned a benign microorganism into a pathogen that causes necrotizing fasciitis. Despite decades of study, epidemics represent a considerable threat to human health, partly because researchers have been unable to pinpoint the nature and timing of key molecular events that turn some microbes into virulent pathogens.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Asian air pollution effects on Pacific Ocean storms

Atmospheric aerosols from air pollution in China and other economically fast-growing Asian countries may exert far-reaching impacts on the Pacific storm track, which is a dominant weather driver in the Northern Hemisphere, according to a study.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Glucose and aggression in married couples

A 21-day study of daily blood glucose levels in married couples finds that decreased blood glucose, which is related to self-control, correlated with increased aggressive behavior toward participants’ spouses. Self-control requires energy in the form of blood glucose, and this energy can be depleted over time, leading to an erosion of self-control.


Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Neuroscience Bulletin
Alzheimer’s disease: from molecule to clinic

To help scientists and clinicians in the field better understand AD, we have organized this special issue. The 18 papers include 3 original research articles and 15 reviews invited from 17 laboratories in China, the United States, Canada, and Sweden. The content of this special issue covers the most recent progress in understanding the epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis, and potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of AD.


Contact: weibin
bwei@sibs.ac.cn
Life Science Press, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Showing releases 1-25 out of 616 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]