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Showing releases 1-25 out of 727 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ]

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Science
Science's top 10 breakthroughs of 2014

The Rosetta spacecraft caught up with the comet known as 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko beyond Mars this August, and its preliminary results—along with the studies it will allow in the near-future—top this year’s list of the most important scientific breakthroughs, according to the editors of Science.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Science
A deep water seesaw for warm climate

The formation of deep water in the southern hemisphere slowed down about 127,000 years ago, during the last interglacial period, when the global temperature was about 2 degrees Celsius warmer than it is today -- and researchers suggest that this hiccup may have caused the drop in atmospheric carbon dioxide that occurred around the same time.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Science
Comeback for Europe’s large carnivores

Populations of the brown bear and other large European carnivores are holding stable or increasing in size throughout Europe, suggesting that big carnivores and humans may have found a way to coexist in on a crowded continent. The data survey conducted by Guillaume Chapron and colleagues suggests that at least one-third of mainland Europe hosts a major carnivore species like the brown bear, Eurasian lynx, grey wolf, or wolverine.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Science
Science’s 2014 Breakthrough of the Year -- Rosetta’s rendezvous with a comet

The Rosetta spacecraft and its lander module, known as Philae, made headlines in November when Philae touched down on the surface of a speeding comet, known as 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. However, the best science is yet to come, according to the editors of Science, who placed Rosetta’s rendezvous with 67P at the top of their annual list of scientific breakthroughs.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Snapshots of cells speed up antibiotic testing

Researchers have developed an image-based test to rapidly and accurately determine bacteria’s susceptibility to antibiotics. The method cuts down test times from about 16 to four hours, promising to help doctors treat patients more quickly and curb drug resistance owing to antibiotic overuse and misuse, which has escalated into a global health issue.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
BioScience
Contrasting views of kin selection assessed

Researchers have used several different ways of testing Hamilton’s rule, the core mathematical formula of kin selection, as an explanation for the evolution of much altruistic behavior in animals. These vary in their realism and their ability to generate predictions. The variety of approaches, as well as different views about what constitutes an explanation, helps explain a divisive debate about the importance of kin selection in evolution. A new criterion of “causal aptness” could help resolve disputes.

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
Science
Mars’ mystery methane and ancient atmosphere

New results from the Curiosity rover suggest that the level of methane in Mars’ atmosphere at the Gale Crater is generally lower than models predict but that it spikes frequently, implying that the gas is produced periodically by a nearby -- but unknown -- source. Since most of Earth’s methane production has a biological origin, researchers have been trying to measure methane on Mars and make sense of the conflicting reports from space- and ground-based observations.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
JAMA
Low-glycemic index carbohydrate diet does not improve cardiovascular risk factors, insulin resistance

In a study that included overweight and obese participants, those with diets with low glycemic index of dietary carbohydrate did not have improvements in insulin sensitivity, lipid levels, or systolic blood pressure, according to a study in the December 17 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Frank M. Sacks, M.D.
jcaragher@partners.org
617-525-6373
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
JAMA
Study compares effectiveness of antiviral drugs to prevent hepatitis B virus-related hepatitis among patients receiving chemotherapy for lymphoma

Among patients with lymphoma undergoing a certain type of chemotherapy, receiving the antiviral drug entecavir resulted in a lower incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatitis and HBV reactivation, compared with the antiviral drug lamivudine, according to a study in the December 17 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Tongyu Lin, M.D., Ph.D.
tongyulin@hotmail.com
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Science and Technology Review
The green therapy for cancer - hyperthermia

Hyperthermia is an ancient science. The famous ancient Greek physician Hippocrates said, "Surgeries can cure what drugs can’t; heat can cure what surgeries can’t; while no treatment for what heat can’t cure." It predicted to a certain extent the important role of hyperthermia in cancer therapy.

Contact: Tiantian
tiantian@cast.org.cn
Science and Technology Review

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Drought and sustainability at ancient Maya city

Effective land use practices allowed the ancient Maya city of Tikal to sustain an urban population for many centuries within a tropical forest, a study suggests. Though Tikal is widely accepted as a key political center of the Maya realm, researchers have not fully worked out how the city provided adequate food, fuel, and other sustenance to maintain its substantial population.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Resilient Roman architectural mortar

A study finds that minerals produced during the curing of a volcanic ash-lime mortar impede propagation of structural cracks and protect Imperial-age Roman concrete structures from earthquake damage. Roman monuments constructed from unreinforced concrete such as Trajan’s Markets have stood for more than 1,900 years despite repeated seismic stresses and foundation settlement.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Laser altimetry and changes in the Greenland Ice Sheet

A method of documenting detailed changes in the Greenland Ice Sheet reveals that ice sheet dynamics may be more complex than previously thought and that the observations may help improve models that predict the response of glaciers to climate change, according to a study. Satellite observations have yielded estimates that the Greenland Ice Sheet has lost an increasing amount of mass each year since the late 1990s, yet the predictions are based on a small number of sample sites.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Achieving policy goal for the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone

The Gulf of Mexico’s low oxygen “dead zone” can be reduced to meet a national policy goal at an estimated annual cost of $2.7 billion, a study suggests. An increasing number of low-oxygen or hypoxic zones now affect more than 480 coastal marine systems worldwide.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Environmental impacts of vehicle fuel alternatives

A model of the environmental health impacts of alternative vehicle fuels suggests that an increase in vehicles powered by renewable energies such as wind, water, and solar may reduce vehicle pollution, whereas vehicles powered by corn ethanol and electricity from coal may increase pollution. Transportation vehicles produce greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to global warming, but the vehicles also produce particulate matter (PM) and ozone, which can affect human health.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A study proposes a method to fabricate thermotropic liquid crystals, materials that can be used in technological applications and exhibit properties of both liquids and solids depending on temperature, by combining and dehydrating complexes of large biomolecules, including DNA, proteins, and viruses, with surfactants.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetics of horse domestication

Genome sequencing of ancient horse specimens reveals that the modern domesticated horse species experienced changes in locomotion, physiology, and cognition during domestication, and that its domestication resulted in the accumulation of a high number of deleterious gene mutations, according to a study. Investigations into the genetic underpinnings of horse domestication have been limited by a lack of closely related wild horse species for comparison.

Contact: Luwam Yeibio
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Nature Geoscience
Past global warming similar to today's

The rate at which carbon emissions warmed Earth's climate almost 56 million years ago resembles modern, human-caused global warming much more than previously believed, but involved two pulses of carbon to the atmosphere, University of Utah researchers and their colleagues found.

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting
The Deep Carbon Observatory: Investigating quantities, movements, forms and origins of carbon in Earth

More than 100 deep carbon science presentations at 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting underscore pace of discovery and implications for human activities

Contact: Katie Pratt
katie_pratt@mail.uri.edu
Deep Carbon Observatory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Images in Roman mosaics meant to dispel the envious

Driving away bad luck, the evil eye and, in short, envious people—this was one of the purposes of mosaics in Ancient Rome, according to research coordinated by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), which analyzed rituals and magic practices in these artistic representations.

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
fjalonso@bib.uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
UC3M participates in a new simulator that provides training in cybersecurity

Researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad de Málaga (UMA) have collaborated with the consulting and technology company Indra on the development of a new advanced simulator of training in cybersecurity, a system that teaches users how to carry out computer forensics, prevent cyber attacks and learn techniques of cyber defense.

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Science
The avian tree of life

An international effort to sequence the genomes of 45 avian species has yielded the most reliable tree of life for birds to date. This new avian family tree helps to clarify how modern birds—the most species-rich class of four-limbed vertebrates on the planet—emerged rapidly from a mass extinction event that wiped out all of the dinosaurs approximately 66 million years ago.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Science
Factors behind new malaria drug resistance

Two teams of researchers in this issue report on the molecular mechanisms behind emerging resistance to the malaria drug artemisinin. One team, led by Judith Straimer, confirms that “propeller mutations” in the K13 gene of plasmodium malaria are responsible for resistance.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Science
Twenty-minute talk can shift attitudes on same-sex marriage

Voters who spoke about same sex-marriage with gay door-to-door canvassers increased their support for the marriages after just a 20-minute conversation, according to a new experiment by Michael LaCour and Donald Green. This effect persisted up to nine months later, with strong evidence that the change in attitude even spread to other members of the voters’ households.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Science
Comet’s water composition could hint at oceans’ origin

Direct measurements of the deuterium-hydrogen ratio in water from the Jupiter Family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko could clarify the question of where the Earth got its water, according to a new report from Kathrin Altwegg and colleagues.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 1-25 out of 727 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 ]