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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 701 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Science
Growing pains for thousand talents

In 2008, the Chinese government initiated a new program for attracting foreign talent to China: the so-called “Thousand Talents” plan, designed to recruit up to 2,000 leading scientists, entrepreneurs, and financial experts to China over five to ten years. Chinese universities help recruit the scholars and are sometimes given monetary incentives, portions of which are to go to the recruited scholar’s salary while the rest is distributed to other faculty.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Science
Ferns’ sex ratio determined by cooperation

A community of individual fern plants maintains an optimal balance of males and females through a complex chemical communication system, according to a new study by Junmu Tanaka and colleagues. In the Japanese climbing fern, the plant hormone gibberellin encourages the development of male organs.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Science
Invading lizards drive rapid evolution

A recent lizard invasion in the southeastern United States has demonstrated that evolutionary change can occur swiftly when two closely related species compete.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Science
Archaeologists discover early high-altitude human settlements

Researchers in the Peruvian Andes have uncovered evidence for perhaps the oldest extremely high-altitude human presence in the Americas. The sites they discovered, at nearly 4,500 meters above sea level, were established more than 12,000 years ago, during the late Pleistocene.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Science
New microscope peers at subcellular gears in action

Thanks to a new microscope that captures 3-D images of subcellular activity in real time, scientists can trace the pathways of nerve cells that form synapses in the brain, observe developmental activity in fertilized eggs, or follow progress of proteins that clump together to cause disease, among other imaging feats once thought impossible.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Intelligent materials that work in space

ARQUIMEA, a company that began in the Business Incubator in the Science Park of the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), will be testing technology it has developed in the International Space Station. The technology is based on intelligent materials that allow objects to be sent into orbit without the use of explosives.

Contact: Fco. Javier Alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Chemical Physics
Triplet Threat from the Sun

Researchers from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland have shown that certain peptides (small proteins) degrade under UV light by first passing through a triplet quantum state, a reactive arrangement that can cause greater damage than fragmentation alone. Their results, described in a paper appearing this week in The Journal of Chemical Physics, from AIP Publishing, explore this pathway of protein degradation and could facilitate the development of better UV protection mechanisms.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
New imaging probe detects drug-resistant bacteria

A new molecular imaging probe can detect whole-body infection by Enterobacteriaceae in mice, as well as antibiotic-resistant strains of the bacteria known as CRE. The probe can also distinguish between true infection and non-pathogenic inflammation.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
JAMA
Making health services prices available linked to lower total claims payments

Searching a health service pricing website before using the service was associated with lower payments for clinical services such as advanced imaging and laboratory tests, according to a study in the October 22/29 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
JAMA
Study finds high percentage of recalled dietary supplements still have banned ingredients

About two-thirds of FDA recalled dietary supplements analyzed still contained banned drugs at least 6 months after being recalled, according to a study in the October 22/29 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Katie DuBoff
katie_duboff@hms.harvard.edu
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

According to a study, species diversification in post-Cambrian clades associated with anatomical traits may be driven to a greater extent by hastened extinction of primitive taxa without the trait than by high rates of diversification among derivative taxa with the trait.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bone remodeling in billfish

A study finds that the heavily-loaded rostral bones of billfishes, such as marlins and swordfish, are maintained by remodeling despite lacking osteocyte cells, which are abundant in the bones of mammals and were previously considered essential for detecting and repairing bone damage. A basic tenet of bone biology states that bone strength is maintained by remodeling, in which osteocytes detect and orchestrate the repair of micro-damage caused by repeated loading.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
El Niño Southern Oscillation and flood risk

Global variability in flooding and risk of economic damage is influenced by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), with higher or lower than normal damage occurring during ENSO years depending on geographical location, according to a study. ENSO is characterized by extended periods of above or below average sea surface temperatures west of South America and can cause extreme climate fluctuations around the world that sometimes result in severe weather events including hurricanes, flooding, or drought.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stress, biological dysfunction, and type 2 diabetes

A study suggests a link between type 2 diabetes, increased exposure to stress, and a weakened biological ability to recover from stress. Epidemiological studies have suggested a link between psychological stress processes and biological dysfunction in the development and progression of type 2 diabetes, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Grafted neurons and Parkinson disease

Researchers report that grafted neural stem cells may partially reverse the symptoms of Parkinson disease in rats via the direct release of dopamine into a part of the forebrain known as the striatum. Loss of dopaminergic neurons and a corresponding decline in dopamine release are hallmark signs of Parkinson disease.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Inflammation and risk for depression

A cytokine called interleukin-6 may be a risk factor for the development of depression, a study in mice suggests. Depression and anxiety are associated with high levels of inflammatory molecules called cytokines, but it has not been clear whether inflammation causes these stress-related disorders.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Health problems and neighborhood attainment

Health problems might drive socially vulnerable individuals to live in poor neighborhoods after a natural disaster, according to a study. Researchers have known that individuals who live in poor neighborhoods tend to have worse health outcomes than those who live in wealthy neighborhoods, but previous research has focused on the effects of neighborhood on health and not vice versa.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Resting memory processing and future learning

Processing of memories during rest periods may enhance future learning, especially learning of related content, according to a study. Offline memory processing, such as spontaneous reactivation of memories during rest, can strengthen memories, although the effect of offline processing on future encoding of new memories is unknown.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Disease transmission and antibiotic-induced hyperinflammation

Highly infectious individuals within a population, known as superspreaders, may be more tolerant to intestinal perturbations caused by antibiotic treatment than non-superspreaders, according to a study. Superspreaders comprise a minority of infected hosts but spread the majority of infections to new hosts.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Meeting
Study finds heart attacks do not have as strong of a genetic link as previously suspected

Heart attacks are not as connected to family history and genetics as may have been previously believed, according to a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.

Contact: Jess C. Gomez
jess.gomez@imail.org
801-507-7455
Intermountain Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences
Chinese power: challenges and R&D opportunities of smart distribution grids

Smart grid has been a key development strategy of energy in China. Scientists at Tianjin University in eastern China conducted a nationwide investigation of the current state of power distribution grids and outlined research and development opportunities to modernize power grids.

the National Social Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 12&ZD208)

Contact: Yu Yixin
yixinyu@tju.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Science
When herbivore numbers drop, plants ditch thorny defenses

Plants can persist in landscapes full of hungry herbivores either by shielding themselves with special defenses, or by putting down roots in regions where carnivores – who hunt the herbivores – roam. The study revealing these results shows how predation and plant defenses interact to shape plant communities.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Science
First results from telescope eying Sun’s most elusive region

The first observations from a telescope designed to visualize an elusive layer of the Sun's atmosphere are in, and they’re helping scientists determine how energy is created there and then transmitted to the vast, cold region of space beyond. The Sun's atmosphere has three main layers.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Science
Tornadoes clustering in greater numbers

Will global warming cause more tornadoes? If so, that has not happened yet, report Harold Brooks and colleagues in this study – though the way tornadoes are distributed in time over the year has been changing, they say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Science
Surprise inside Saturn’s smallest moon

Small oscillations in the movements of Saturn’s smallest moon Mimas may reveal an unexpected interior for the moon, according to a new report from Radwan Tajeddine and colleagues. The researchers used images taken by the Image Science Subsystem onboard the Cassini spacecraft to analyze the rotation of the moon and its orbit around Saturn.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 1-25 out of 701 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 ]