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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 555 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Spanish university research activity

The Spanish University has lost resources and researchers in recent years, but has improved its international productivity and competitiveness, according to data from the new annual IUNE report on university R+D+i. This Alianza 4U observatory, made up of the following universities: Autónoma de Barcelona, Autónoma de Madrid, Carlos III de Madrid and Pompeu Fabra, presented its new research activity report for the Spanish University system (SUE in Spanish) in the past decade.

Contact: fco javier alonso
oic@uc3m.es
Carlos III University of Madrid

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

A decade-long study of 761 directors in 59 Ireland-based companies finds that the extent of company interlocking, a term used to describe a situation in which a company director sits on multiple boards, increased before and during the 2008 Irish financial crisis and peaked in 2009 before stabilizing at low levels, suggesting that company interlocking may contribute to financial instability.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How social interactions promote vocal learning

Evolutionarily similar mechanisms might explain how social interactions rapidly promote vocal learning in humans and songbirds, a study finds. Social interactions are critical for speech and language acquisition, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms by which social processes support vocal learning.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic and phenotypic trends in US population

Researchers report trends in spousal similarity and fertility within the United States population during the 20th century. Nonrandom mating and differential fertility among genotypes can alter the genetic makeup of a population.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How bumblebees detect electric fields

Small, vibrating hairs may explain how bumblebees sense and interpret electric fields, according to a study. Electroreception is common in aquatic mammals, which evolved in the conductive medium of saltwater.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Deposition of contaminants from Deepwater Horizon spill

For months after oil slicks from the Deepwater Horizon spill disappeared, a “blizzard” of particles carried petroleum hydrocarbons, black carbon, and other contaminants to the seafloor, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Psychological interventions and college achievement gaps

A study suggests that teaching students a positive mindset about intelligence or social belonging before college can reduce socioeconomic, racial, and ethnic gaps in student achievement.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Human contribution to biodiversity loss depends on scale

Assessing the role of humans in biodiversity losses worldwide requires analysis of causes and effects at scales ranging from local ecosystems to global climate change, a study finds. Ecologists have long sought to estimate how anthropogenic changes to the environment contribute to observed losses in species biodiversity.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tracking seasonality of disease outbreaks

Trends in Internet searches can reveal patterns related to the seasonality of infectious disease outbreaks, according to a study.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Crop record of Austronesian expansion

Ancient crop records provide insight into the westward Austronesian expansion, according to a study. Although the island of Madagascar lies only 300 miles from continental Africa, the Malagasy people speak an Austronesian language associated with Southeast Asia and Pacific island nations.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 31-May-2016
JAMA
Primary care is point of entry for many kids with concussions

Many children with concussion initially sought care through primary care and not the emergency department (ED), although younger children and those insured by Medicaid were more likely to go to the ED, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.

Contact: Camillia Travia
traviac@email.chop.edu
267-426-6251
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 31-May-2016
European Congress of Endocrinology 2016
Hormone treatment in transgender persons could shed light on role of sex hormones in bone density

Male-to-female (MtF) transgender persons have a greater increase in bone mineral density than female-to-male (FtM) persons in their first year of hormone treatment. The research, presented at the European Congress of Endocrinology in Munich, helps scientists further understand the roles sex hormones play on bone development and maintenance in both sexes.

Contact: Omar Jamshed
omar.jamshed@bioscientifica.com
44-014-546-42206
European Society of Endocrinology

Public Release: 31-May-2016
European Congress of Endocrinology 2016
Running may be better than cycling for long-term bone health

Exercise that puts greater strain on bones, like running, may improve long-term bone health more effectively than non weight-bearing activities like cycling, conclude the authors of a new study measuring the hormones of mountain ultra-marathon runners. The results of the study are presented today at the European Congress of Endocrinology.

Contact: Omar Jamshed
omar.jamshed@bioscientifica.com
44-014-546-42206
European Society of Endocrinology

Public Release: 31-May-2016
European Congress of Endocrinology 2016
Exposure to chemicals in plastic and fungicides may irreversibly weaken children’s teeth

Chemicals commonly found in plastics and fungicides may be weakening children’s teeth by disrupting hormones that stimulate the growth of dental enamel, according to a new study presented today at the European Congress of Endocrinology.

Contact: Omar Jamshed
omar.jamshed@bioscientifica.com
44-014-546-42206
European Society of Endocrinology

Public Release: 30-May-2016
PolyU develops Nasogastric Tube Placement Training system with haptic feedback

This innovative system enables nursing students to practise NGT insertion in computer-simulated virtual environment.

Contact: Hailey Lai
hailey.lai@polyu.edu.hk
852-340-03853
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Public Release: 30-May-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Archaeal and bacterial GDGTs studies in the Chinese marginal seas

Organic proxies based on glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) (e.g. TEX86, MBT/CBT and BIT) have made impressive applications in constructing the paleo oceanography. SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences reported a review of the GDGTs studies in the Chinese marginal seas.

Project of Shanghai Engineering Technology Research Center of Hadal Science (Grant No. 14DZ2250900),The National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013-CB955703)

Contact: ZHANG Chuanlun
archaeazhang_1@tongji.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 30-May-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences
Newly optimized method to extract and analyze lacustrine sedimentary pigments

Sedimentary pigments are useful indicators in evaluating lake phytoplankton biomass, community structure and primary productivity, which have been widely used in exploring climate change and human activity influence on lacustrine ecosystems. Now researchers in Institute of Tibetan Plateau, Beijing have published a newly designed orthogonal test mode to optimized the methods to extract and analyze sedimentary pigments.

National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB956100) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41072120,41321061).

Contact: JIE Liang
liangjie@itpcas.ac.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 30-May-2016
Nano Research
Inside-out Ostwald ripening

A facile inside-out Ostwald ripening route to the two kinds of morphological TiO2 microspheres (hollow and solid structure) is developed. During the formation process of TiO2 hollow microspheres, precipitation of solid cores, subsequent deposition of outer shells on the surface of cores, and simultaneous core dissolution and shell recrystallization are successfully observed. The post-processing treatment enlarges pore sizes, strengthens crystallinity, and reduces trap states, which could improve the photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 30-May-2016
European Congress of Endocrinology 2016
Stubborn gut bacteria offer insights into yo-yo dieting

Previously obese dieters may struggle to keep weight off because of poor gut bacteria diversity, according to a new study presented today at the European Congress of Endocrinology.

For every cell that makes up the body, there are ten bacteria living on and in it – which means the diversity of bacterial species we have in our system (known as the microbiome) has a huge impact on our health.

Contact: Omar Jamshed
omar.jamshed@bioscientifica.com
44-014-546-42206
European Society of Endocrinology

Public Release: 30-May-2016
European Congress of Endocrinology 2016
Preterm babies with low birth weight may increase risk of osteoporosis

Adults who were born prematurely or at a below average weight are more likely to have weaker bones and an increased risk of fracture and osteoporosis later in life. This research, presented at the European Congress of Endocrinology, could lead to recommendations that high-risk individuals follow diets rich in calcium, vitamin D and protein, and undertake weight-bearing exercise.

Contact: Omar Jamshed
omar.jamshed@bioscientifica.com
44-014-546-42206
European Society of Endocrinology

Public Release: 29-May-2016
European Congress of Endocrinology 2016
Study reveals more accurate method of detecting pregnant women at high risk of preeclampsia

An additional blood test for pregnant women accurately predicts which women with high thyroid function are at risk of developing preeclampsia, according to a study presented today at the European Congress of Endocrinology. The findings may help identify high-risk pregnant women and potentially avoid unnecessary treatment that carries the risk of foetal abnormalities.

Contact: Omar Jamshed
omar.jamshed@bioscientifica.com
44-014-546-42206
European Society of Endocrinology

Public Release: 27-May-2016
Science
Schrödinger's cat is alive and dead in two places at once

Through new experiments involving the famous Schrödinger cat state paradox, researchers have shown that a 'quantum cat' can be both alive and dead, and in two places at once.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-May-2016
Science
Mars is emerging from an Ice Age

Radar measurements of Mars’ polar ice caps reveal that the now mostly dry and dusty planet is emerging from an ice age, following multiple rounds of climate change.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 27-May-2016
Science
New 'genetic barcode' technique reveals details of cell lineage

By using the gene editing tool CRISPR to create unique genetic'“barcodes,' it’s possible to track the lineage of cells in a living organism, a new study reveals.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-May-2016
Nano Research
Noble metal nanoclusters and their in situ calcination to nanocrystals

Noble metal nanoclusters and nanocrystals become the hot spot because of their applications in catalysis area. Jiatao Zhang etc. from Beijing Institute of Technology developed a versatile aqueous method to prepare Au, Ag, Cu nanoclusters on TiO2 nanosheets support. Then based on in-situ calcination, the Au, Ag, Cu nanocrystals on TiO2 support have been prepared too. These noble metal nanoclusters and nanocrystals have demonstrated potential applications in catalytic organic synthesis and photocatalysis.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Showing releases 1-25 out of 555 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]