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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 605 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science
Inland ice in Antarctica melting fast

Many glaciers on the Southern Antarctic Peninsula (SAP) became destabilized in 2009 and have melted at accelerating rates since then, researchers say. These glaciers, which rest on bedrock that dips below sea level toward the continent’s interior, help to buttress inland ice shelves -- but their structures are thought to be unstable.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science
Similarities seen between cancerous and sun-Exposed cells

Normal human skin cells harbor a surprisingly large number of acquired mutations, including many known cancer-promoters that are under strong positive selection, researchers say. These new findings reveal that so-called driver mutations, which are known to accumulate in certain skin cancer cells, also occur frequently in normal, sun-exposed skin cells.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science
Paraplegic patient reveals neurons behind planning

Microelectrodes implanted in the brain of a paraplegic patient are telling researchers more about the neuronal activity underlying our physical movements. These new findings represent an important step toward improved neuro-prosthetic devices, highlighting the crucial role of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in both actual and imagined movements.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science
Tara Oceans Expedition yields treasure trove of plankton data

In five related reports in this issue of the journal Science, a multinational team of researchers who spent three and a half years sampling the ocean’s sunlit upper layers aboard the schooner Tara unveil the first results of the Tara Oceans project. Planktonic life in the ocean is far more diverse than scientists knew, these reports show.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-May-2015
China Century signs agreement with University of Chicago Medicine

China Century Group and the University of Chicago Medicine signed an exclusive agreement Thursday to improve health care delivery in China by bringing international standards and best practices to hospitals across the country.

Contact: Emilio Williams
Emilio.Williams@uchospitals.edu
773-702-4617
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 21-May-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Overlooked protein drives tissue fibrosis

A new study uncovers an overlooked protein’s role in driving fibrosis, or excessive scarring of tissue. Blocking this protein, known as αvβ1 integrin, reduced fibrotic tissue in mice, offering a new strategy for treating this disease.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-May-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Secrets of an ancient Chinese remedy for malaria finally uncovered

An ancient Chinese herbal medicine for malaria, known scientifically as febrifugine, works by disrupting the parasites’ protein-building machinery, a new study shows. A compound based on febrifugine designed by the researchers proved effective and much safer than the traditional herbal medicine for treating malaria infection in mice, offering a starting point for a new class of drugs for this mosquito-borne disease.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
janderso@aaas.org
202-326-6466
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Harvesting Energy from Electromagnetic Waves

This week in the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing, researchers from the University of Waterloo in Canada report a novel design for electromagnetic energy harvesting based on the "full absorption concept." This involves the use of metamaterials that can be tailored to produce media that neither reflects nor transmits any power -- enabling full absorption of incident waves at a specific range of frequencies and polarizations.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Photonic Crystal Nanolaser Biosensor Simplifies DNA Detection

As the team of Yokohama National University researchers in Japan reports in Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing, they created a photonic crystal nanolaser biosensor capable of detecting the adsorption of biomolecules based on the laser’s wavelength shift.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Journal of Chemical Physics
Where the Rubber Meets the Road

Researchers combine simple experiments first employed by Leonardo da Vinci with advanced theory to reveal new atomic-level insights into what happens when rubber slides across asphalt.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that mice expressing a defective form of an enzyme that cleaves chitin, a major component of dust mite exoskeletons, exhibited increased inflammatory responses to inhaled dust mites because cleaved chitin can trigger deactivation of the inflammatory response, suggesting possible treatment strategies for airway inflammation caused by dust mites.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mobility, agriculture, and bone strength

Changes to human bone strength during the Holocene Epoch may be due to dramatic changes in mobility following the initiation of agriculture, according to a study. Declining bone strength relative to body size in humans since the Pleistocene Epoch has been attributed to increasing sedentism, with associated changes in social structure and health.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Disease forecasting through machine learning

Researchers report a method for predicting new sources of rodent-borne diseases. As animal-borne disease outbreaks increase in frequency, anticipating future outbreaks becomes a public health priority.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gene expression profiles of single brain cells

Researchers report a method for classifying individual cells in the human brain based on gene expression profiles. The human brain contains an enormous variety of cell types that differ in gene expression patterns. Previous approaches to classifying the cell types have been limited to using only a few gene or protein markers and analyzing whole populations of cells.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gene editing, phage therapy, and antibiotic resistance

A proof-of-concept study suggests that phage therapy might offer an approach to address the long-intractable problem of antibiotic resistance. Phage therapy, predicated on tailored viruses that target pathogenic bacteria, could help counter the surge of antibiotic resistance, but the strategy suffers from shortfalls, not least of which are the difficulty of delivering phages into infected tissues and the frequent transfer of phage-resistance genes between bacteria.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 19-May-2015
JAMA
Studies examine prevalence of amyloid among adults and its association with cognitive impairment

Two studies in the May 19 issue of JAMA analyze the prevalence of the plaque amyloid among adults of varying ages, with and without dementia, and its association with cognitive impairment.

Contact: Willemijn J. Jansen,M.Sc.
willemijn.jansen@maastrichtuniversity.nl
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Science Bulletin
Bicycle kick in soccer – is the virtuosity systematically entrainable?

The great attraction of soccer for millions of fans may trace down to the basic idea of the game: the goal. Among all the techniques, the bicycle kick has especially provided viewers moments of breathtaking spectacle. Unfortunately, there is actually a dearth of study on the biomechanics of the bicycle kick. Using 3D motion capture technology and full-body biomechanical modeling, a Canadian-Chinese research team has initiated an investigation on the skill.

National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)

Contact: Gongbing Shan
g.shan@uleth.ca
Science China Press

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature
Population benefits of sexual selection explain the existence of males

New research from the University of East Anglia shows that an evolutionary force known as ‘sexual selection’ can explain the persistence of sex as a dominant mechanism for reproducing offspring.

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 17-May-2015
ATS 2015 International Conference
Many children with asthma have reaction to peanuts, but do not know it

In recent years and months, peanut allergies in children have been in the news frequently, as scientists reveal new insights into why more and more children are developing them and what can be done to avoid them. However, until now, few have studied the connection between peanut allergy and childhood asthma.

Contact: Nathaniel Dunford
ndunford@thoracic.org
American Thoracic Society

Public Release: 16-May-2015
Biomicrofluidics
New IVF device may improve fertility treatment

To make IVF more efficient, a team of researchers from National Tsing Hua University and the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan has developed a technique to more effectively grow and screen embryos prior to implantation. Their results, published in the journal Biomicrofluidics, from AIP Publishing, could facilitate more targeted selection of embryos to implant, lead to higher IVF success rates, and ultimately and lower its cost.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-May-2015
AIP Advances
Floats like a mosquito, stings like a...mosquito

By examining the forces that the segments of mosquito legs generate against a water surface, researchers at the China University of Petroleum (Huadong) and Liaoning University of Technology have unraveled the mechanical logic that allows the mosquitoes to walk on water, which may help in the design of biomimetic structures, such as aquatic robots and small boats.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-May-2015
Review of Scientific Instruments
The future of holographic video

Using surface acoustic waves to control light's angle and color composition, BYU and MIT researchers open door to inexpensive holographic video displays.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Acoustic levitation made simple

A team of researchers at the University of São Paulo in Brazil has developed a new levitation device that can hover a tiny object with more control than any instrument that has come before.

Contact: Zhengzheng Zhang
zzhang@aip.org
001-301-209-3099
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Science
Bees follow separate but similar paths in social evolution

There’s more than one way to evolve the unique social structure that characterizes colony-living animals like bees, according to a detailed genome analysis conducted by Karen Kapheim and colleagues. Bees are eusocial, meaning that some of their workers forego reproduction to care for their siblings.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Science
Why modern hunter-gatherers live with so few kin

Allowing both males and females in hunter-gatherer groups to choose their living companions reduces the number of family members in individual hunter-gatherer camps, a new study shows. The results answer a longstanding mystery about why hunter-gatherer populations have evolved to comprise large numbers of unrelated individuals, especially since hunter-gatherers have shown a strong preference to live with kin.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 1-25 out of 605 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 ]