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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 525 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]

Public Release: 12-Feb-2016
Science
Abnormal combos of peptides may contribute to diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) may be linked to insulin-related peptides that mistakenly bond to other peptides within the pancreas and spleen, a new study suggests.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2016
Science
Teachers’ knowledge and values can hinder climate education

Most U.S. science teachers include climate science in their courses, yet political ideology and insufficient grasp of the science may be hindering the quality of their teaching, authors of this Education Forum say.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2016
Science
Land reservoirs helped offset sea level rise, study says

Recent increases in the storage of excess groundwater may be helping to offset sea level rise by as much as 15%, a new study finds.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2016
Science
Neandertal-derived DNA may influence depression and more in modern humans

Researchers have found correlations between Neanderthal-derived genes and disease states in modern humans -- including those influencing the skin, the immune system, depression, addiction, and metabolism.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug’s toxicity

In one of the first efforts to date to apply nanotechnology to targeted cancer therapeutics, researchers have created a nanoparticle formulation of a cancer drug that is both effective and nontoxic -- qualities harder to achieve with the free drug.

Contact: Meagan Phelan
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
JAMA
Task-oriented rehab program does not result in greater recovery from stroke

The use of a structured, task-oriented rehabilitation program, compared with usual rehabilitation, did not result in better motor function or recovery after 12 months for patients with moderate upper extremity impairment following a stroke, according to a study in the Feb. 9, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Zen Vuong
zvuong@usc.edu
213-740-5277
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
JAMA
Study compares effectiveness of behavioral interventions to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing

Among primary care practices, the use of two socially motivated behavioral interventions -- accountable justification and peer comparison -- resulted in significant reductions in inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections, while an intervention that lacked a social component, suggested alternatives, had no significant effect, according to a study in the Feb. 9, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Emily Gersema
gersema@usc.edu
213-740-0252
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report that a clonally dividing group of CD4+ T cells that harbored replication-competent, infectious HIV-1 provirus persisted over several years in the lymphoid and tumor tissues of a now-deceased 58-year-old African American man, who was on combination antiretroviral therapy against HIV and had metastatic squamous cell cancer, suggesting that clonally expanded populations of T cells might represent a persistent reservoir of infectious HIV in infected individuals.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sleep deprivation and false confessions

Sleep deprivation might make individuals more likely to falsely admit to wrongdoing, according to a study. False confessions are thought to account for up to 25% of wrongful convictions in the United States.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Restful REM sleep might help treat depression and anxiety

Restless rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep interferes with the overnight resolution of emotional distress, leading to the development of chronic hyperarousal, a study suggests. Insomnia is a common sleep disorder associated with depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Evolution of brain shape in New World monkeys

A study suggests that primate brain evolution may have occurred in separate bursts, with brain shape convergence occurring at a late stage after earlier diversification. Brain shape diversification over the course of evolution is an important feature of primate adaptive radiation.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Seasons may affect brain function

Certain human cognitive functions appear to vary depending on the season, according to a study. Mood changes have been linked to seasonality, but little is known about how other human brain functions may vary according to the seasons. Christelle Meyer and colleagues measured the cognitive brain function of 28 volunteers at different times of the year. For each testing period, each participant spent 4.5 days in the laboratory, devoid of seasonal cues, such as daylight, and without access to the external world.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Circadian misalignment and heart disease risk

A study may help explain why shift work increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Shift work is associated with increased blood pressure and inflammation, which can lead to cardiovascular disease. Because shift work results in inversion of sleep-wake cycles relative to the body's internal clock, Christopher Morris and colleagues measured blood pressure, inflammatory markers, and indicators of autonomic nervous system activity in healthy participants during controlled sleep studies.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Promoting risky cooperation in humans

Researchers report that the hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) promotes risky cooperation in humans. Previous research suggests that cooperation is intrinsically rewarding, allowing humans to overcome any risks associated with cooperation.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Categorical color perception and language acquisition

The visual system can support the perception of color categories prior to the acquisition of language, according to a study. Humans can distinguish thousands of colors, but individuals across cultures use relatively few words to describe a continuous color space.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Measuring real-world value of natural capital

An approach to understanding and measuring the real-world value of natural resources may help governments and businesses redefine conservation expenditures as investments, according to a study. The term "natural capital" refers to the natural resources that humans can use to support life on Earth.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 9-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Robot cockroaches could help hunt for survivors in rubble piles

Robots that mimic cockroaches might someday assist search-and-rescue missions by scurrying through piles of debris to find survivors, according to study. Cockroaches can infest virtually any space by exploiting rigid, jointed exoskeletons to slip through seemingly impassable crevices.

Contact: The PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Nano Research
Atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscope imaging up to 27 T in a water-cooled magnet

Using a homebuilt harsh-condition scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the authors have implemented real space atomic resolution imaging up to 27T in a 32mm bore water-cooled magnet (WM), which exceeds the maximum magnetic field of any conventional superconducting magnet (SM). It has paved the way to STM imaging in the 45T hybrid magnet (outer SM plus inner WM), which is the world’s strongest steady field magnet with the same bore diameter of 32mm.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Nano Research
Low-temperature solution process for preparing flexible transparent carbon nanotube film and for use in flexible supercapacitors

A diazo dye (Congo red)-based simple solution process has been developed to prepare highly flexible carbon nanotube film with low sheet resistance (34±6.6 Ω/□) and high transmittance (81% at 550 nm) that rivals or outperforms its competitors. The flexible SWNT film prepared on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate was utilized as an electrode to deposit manganese dioxide (MnO2), which showed high specific capacitance and bendability, demonstrating promise as a candidate electrode material for flexible supercapacitors.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Science
Hair thinning by stem cell loss

Why people lose their locks in old age may be related to the aging of hair follicle stem cells, two new studies suggest. Though it is known that mammals that live for longer lifespans lose their hair, the mechanisms underlying this fate have been a mystery.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Science
Greenland ice sheet is being shaped by its past

A stiff upper layer of ice that formed atop of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the Holocene era may be causing the deceleration of ice flow within, a new study suggests. A better understanding of the inner nature of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is critical for estimating its mass loss in the future, and thus sea level rise.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Science
Mites drive deformed wing virus in honeybees

A new analysis of one of the most widespread honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus, or DWV, shows that the virus has gone from an endemic to a global epidemic because of greater movement of a major vector, the Varroa mite.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Science
Europe’s managed forests are contributing to warming; worldwide deforestation is increasing surface temperatures

Two new studies reveal how altering tree coverage is influencing not only the carbon cycle, but air surface temperatures to a significant degree as well. The results highlight how human-made changes to forests hold more severe consequences than previously believed.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Model helps decide drug dose for clinical testing

A mathematical model may offer a valuable tool for selecting the proper dose of antiviral drugs for further testing in clinical trials. Researchers showed that the model can accurately predict the results of a clinical study of a herpes drug and pinpoint the most effective dose for treatment.

Contact: Jennifer Anderson
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Science Bulletin
Smartphones for Sensing

Simple, portable analytical devices are permeating into different aspects of our daily lives. Smartphones, as the most popular state-of-art mobile device, have demonstrated remarkable potential for sensing. In a review published in 2016(3) issue of Science Bulletin, recent researches focusing on smartphone sensing including representative electromagnetic, optical and electrochemical sensors have been summarized. The development of these capabilities will lead to more compact, lightweight, cost-effective and durable devices in terms of their performances in the future.

National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Niu Li
lniu@ciac.ac.cn
Science China Press

Showing releases 1-25 out of 525 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]