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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 519 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]

Public Release: 26-Aug-2016
Science
Finally, the brain sensor that turns down the heat

At long last, researchers have zeroed in on the neurons that act as the brain’s internal thermostat. Their discovery may be harnessed for therapeutic control of body temperature in conditions where it’s beneficial for temperature to be reduced, such as recovery after trauma.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Aug-2016
Science
Challenges and possible solutions to the refugee crisis in Europe

In this Policy Forum, Randall Hansen and Shalini Randeria discuss the different ideological viewpoints of liberals and conservatives in Europe in regards to accepting refugees, outlining reasons for why these countries should adopt a more open door policy.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Aug-2016
Science
Stormy weather 'bombs' the ocean and emits useful waves

Among the various ripples sourcing from a 'weather bomb' in the middle of the Atlantic, scientists have, for the first time, detected a rarer type of deep-earth tremor, contributing to a clearer picture of our earth’s structure and movements, even those originating from the ocean.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 26-Aug-2016
Science
Optimizing the delivery of health products via vouchers

Distributing health products through a simple voucher system, where people expend a small amount of time and effort to attain a free water treatment solution, is effective for screening out people who would accept the product for free but end up not using it, a new study reports.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Science Translational Medicine
'Reversible' blood thinner may cut bleeding risk

In an academic-industrial collaboration, researchers have developed an antibody that blocks the formation of blood clots without triggering bleeding, a serious risk associated with current blood thinners.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers report an otoscope-a tool for ear inspection-that uses shortwave infrared light to improve the resolution of anatomical structures found behind thin tissue; the otoscope can help visualize underlying middle ear anatomy and enhance the detection of middle ear fluid, which is necessary for diagnosing otitis media, an inflammation of the middle ear that is estimated to be often misdiagnosed.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ground-level ozone and regional climate change

A study suggests a link between climate change and increased ground-level ozone in the southeastern United States (SE).

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How chimpanzees control competition

A study suggests that chimpanzees and humans use similar mechanisms to overcome competition and achieve common goals.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bird diversity and vulnerability on islands

A study suggests a link between island bird biodiversity and the vulnerability of island bird species to extinction.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
JAMA
Studies explore use of genetics to help determine appropriate treatment for fever in children

Two studies appearing in the August 23/30 issue of JAMA examine the use of genetic tests to help rule out a serious bacterial infection in infants with fever, and also to determine if an infection is bacterial or viral in children with fever.

Contact: Michael Levin
m.levin@imperial.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
World’s biggest telescope meets world’s second fastest supercomputer

A prototype part of the software system to manage data from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope has run on the world’s second fastest supercomputer in China.

The complete system, currently being designed by an international consortium, will process raw observations of distant stars and galaxies and turn them into a form that can be analysed by astronomers around the world.

Contact: Pete Wheeler
pete.wheeler@icrar.org
61-423-982-018
International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research

Public Release: 19-Aug-2016
Science
Using nature’s recipe to create mother of pearl

Researchers have successfully created synthetic nacre remarkably similar to the natural material, also known as mother of pearl.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Aug-2016
Science
Modifying a living genome with genetic equivalent of 'search and replace'

Researchers including George Church have made further progress on the path to fully rewriting the genome of living bacteria.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Aug-2016
Science
Born prepared for global warming…thanks to their parents’ songs

By calling to their eggs, zebra finch parents may be helping their young develop beneficial adaptive mechanisms in preparation for a hotter world brought on by climate change.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Aug-2016
Science
Predicting poverty by satellite with detailed accuracy

By combining satellite data and eloquent machine learning, researchers have developed a technique that accurately estimates household consumption and income.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Aug-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Precision medicine will benefit from animal models

One year into the National Institutes of Health’s Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI), the massive project could still benefit from incorporating experimental studies of animal models of human disease, according to Kent Lloyd and colleagues in this Editorial.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers developed a genome sequencing method that helps analyze and quantify random somatic mutations across nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in normal human tissues, and found that factors such as age, tissue type, and exposure to carcinogens affected mutation prevalence and spectrum, suggesting a potential use for the technology in biomedicine.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
First land plants and Earth’s oxygen levels

The emergence and evolution of land plants may explain a longstanding mystery of how Earth’s atmosphere became enriched with oxygen.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Methane emissions in the Four Corners region

Researchers report the results of airborne measurements of methane emissions in the Four Corners region of the Southwest United States.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Circadian rhythms and viral infections

A study suggests that the timing of a viral infection, in relation to the host’s circadian cycle, can influence disease progression.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reconstructing human coronavirus emergence

A study reconstructs the emergence of a human respiratory coronavirus from dromedary camels.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
RNA synthesis by RNA enzyme

Researchers report protein-free RNA replication and synthesis of various functional RNA molecules by an RNA polymerase ribozyme.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
JAMA
Use of feeding tubes decreases among nursing home residents with advanced Dementia

In a study appearing in the August 16 issue of JAMA, Susan L. Mitchell, M.D., M.P.H., of Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research, Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues examined feeding tube insertion rates from 2000-2014 among US nursing home residents with advanced dementia.

Contact: Courtney Howe
CourtneyHowe@hsl.harvard.edu
617-363-8267
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
JAMA
Injected drug reduces risk of fracture among women with Osteoporosis

Among postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at risk of fracture, daily injection of the drug abaloparatide for 18 months significantly reduced the risk of new vertebral and nonvertebral fractures compared with placebo, according to a study appearing in the August 16 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Paul D. Miller
millerccbr@aol.com
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 15-Aug-2016
BioScience
New meta-analysis shows engineered hard shorelines are a threat to ecosystems

Artificial shoreline hardening is often used to protect human structures from coastal hazards, but the practice may negatively affect coastal ecosystems.

Contact: James M Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Showing releases 1-25 out of 519 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 ]