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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 543 releases.
Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Science Bulletin
The cause of high Tc superconductivity at the interface between FeSe and SrTiO3

In 2012 a superconductor with potentially very high critical temperature was discovered at the interface between an atomically thin iron selenide (FeSe) film grown on strontium titanate (SrTiO3) substrate. Now a research team made up of Beijing and Berkeley scientists have carried out the first approximation-free theoretical study to identify the cause of high critical temperature in such system.

中国国家自然科学基金(11474175, 11374018)美国能源部基础能源材料科学和工程部门(DE-AC02-05CH11231)

Contact: Hong Yao
yaohong@tsinghua.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
JAMA
Medications to prevent additional stroke may be less effective for patients with certain gene variants

In a study published online by JAMA, Yongjun Wang, M.D., of Capital Medical University, Beijing, and colleagues examined the association between variants of the gene CYP2C19 and clinical outcomes of clopidogrel-treated patients with minor stroke or transient ischemic attack. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the Second Annual Scientific Session of the Chinese Stroke Association and the Tiantan International Stroke Conference in Beijing.

Contact: Yongjun Wang
yongjunwang1962@gmail.com
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Science
Maximizing biomedical research through integrated science

In this Policy Forum, Phillip Sharp and colleagues discuss the need for better integration of engineering, physical, computational, and mathematical sciences with biomedical science, as they publish a report this week outlining some key recommendations.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Science
Single gene drives prostate differentiation

Expression of a single gene can convert cells lining the seminal vesicle into prostate cells, a new study shows.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Science
Why fathers don’t pass on mitochondria to offspring

Offering insights into a long-standing and mysterious bias in biology, a new study reveals how and why mitochondria, a component essential to cell functioning in multicellular organisms, is only passed on through a mother’s egg and not the father’s sperm.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Science
Public’s moral inconsistencies create dilemmas for programming driverless cars

When it comes to autonomous cars, people generally approve of cars programmed to sacrifice their passengers to save others, but these same people are not enthusiastic about riding in such 'utilitarian' vehicles themselves, a new survey reveals.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Jun-2016
Science Translational Medicine
Mini-guts predict cystic fibrosis patients’ response to therapy

Mini-guts grown in the lab using cystic fibrosis patients’ cells can help pinpoint those who are most likely to benefit from new drugs, according to a new study.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jun-2016
Asia Genomics and Insilico Medicine partner to extend healthy human longevity

Insilico Medicine Inc, announced an agreement with Asia Genomics to develop advanced biomarkers of aging and personalized longevity for the Asian population.

Contact: Qingsong Zhu
zhu@insilicomedicine.com
443-451-7212
InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Also of interest from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Researchers used transcriptomic and proteomic methods as well as biochemical analysis to characterize antibodies from oligoclonal immunoglobulin bands (OCB), a multiple sclerosis (MS) biomarker, and found that OCB antibodies and autoantigens from four MS patients, 27-34 years of age, were ubiquitous intracellular proteins not specific to brain tissue, suggesting that rather than mediating direct tissue destruction, OCB might be indicative of a secondary immune response in MS.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Instruction time and student success

A study suggests that increased instruction time might aid student achievement.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bias disclosure and patient trust

A study examines the effects of medical specialty bias disclosure in healthcare settings.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Electric field might aid manufacture of low-fat chocolate

Application of an electric field along the flow direction of a chocolate suspension might help manufacturers produce low-fat chocolate, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Origins of ancient high-altitude Himalayans

The genetic makeup of high-altitude Himalayan populations has remained stable for millennia despite multiple cultural transitions, according to a study

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Global threat from invasive species

A study estimates the threat of invasive species to countries around the world.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Refugees and the local economy

Refugees might benefit the economies of host countries, a study suggests.

Contact: PNAS News Office
PNASnews@nas.edu
202-334-1310
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
JAMA
Improvement seen in US diet, although disparities persist in quality by race/ethnicity, education and income

In nationally representative surveys conducted between 1999 and 2012, several improvements in self-reported dietary habits were identified, such as increased consumption of whole grains, with additional findings suggesting persistent or worsening disparities based on race/ethnicity and education and income level, according to a study appearing in the June 21 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Siobhan Gallagher
siobhan.gallagher@tufts.edu
617-636-6586
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
JAMA
Protein-based risk score may help predict cardiovascular events among patients with heart disease

In a study appearing in the June 21 issue of JAMA, Peter Ganz, M.D., of the University of California-San Francisco, and colleagues conducted a study to develop and validate a score to predict risk of cardiovascular outcomes among patients with coronary heart disease using analysis of circulating proteins.

Contact: JAMA Network Media Relations Department
mediarelations@jamanetwork.org
312-464-5262
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
JAMA
Some plant-based therapies associated with modest improvement in menopausal symptoms

An analysis of more than 60 studies suggests that some plant-based therapies are associated with modest reductions in the frequency of hot flashes and vaginal dryness but no significant reduction in night sweats, according to a study appearing in the June 21 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Taulant Muka
t.muka@erasmusmc.nl
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 20-Jun-2016
SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences
125PFlops, the Sunway TaihuLight Supercomputer is coming

Equipped with the latest homegrown many-core CPU SW26010, the Sunway TaihuLight Supercomputer is the first system in the world to have a peak performance above 100 PFlops. With 260 processing elements within one CPU, one single SW26010 is providing a peak performance of over 3 TFlops. Preliminary work on TaihuLight has achieved promising results on key scientific applications such as earth system modeling, computational dynamic fluids, molecular dynamics, material science, life science, etc.

Contact: YANG Guangwen
yangguangwen@mail.nsccwx.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 20-Jun-2016
Nano Research
Growth of large-area aligned pentagonal graphene domains on high-index copper surfaces

The controlled growth of single crystal pentagonal graphene domains with the same orientation in large-area on Cu foils by CVD is reported. The high-index crystalline surface of the underlying Cu grains contributes to the formation of the pentagonal graphene domains. This work provides a deeper understanding on the mechanism of graphene growth.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 17-Jun-2016
IOF 6th Asia Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting
Experts warn of osteoporosis threat to Asia’s growing elderly population

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) is calling on doctors in the Asia-Pacific region to prepare for an immense increase in the number of elderly people suffering fractures due to osteoporosis. To improve knowledge in this field, IOF will hold the 6th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting, in Singapore, November 4-6, 2016. This will be the region’s key medical conference in the bone and muscle field. Abstracts are invited by June 24. For complete information visit https://www.iofbonehealth.org/singapore-2016

Contact: Rhonda Ng
lmisteli@iofbonehealth.org
International Osteoporosis Foundation

Public Release: 17-Jun-2016
Nano Research
One-step accurate synthesis of shell controllable CoFe2O4 hollow microspheres as high-performance electrode materials in supercapacitor

Multi-shelled CoFe2O4 hollow microspheres with tunable layer number (1-4) have been successfully synthesized with a facile one-step method using cyclodextrin as template followed by calcination. Structural features including the shell numbers, shell porosity were controlled by adjusting the synthesis parameters to produce hollow spheres with excellent capacity and durability. Besides, this is a straightforward and general strategy to fabricate metal oxide or bimetallic metal oxide hollow microspheres with tunable number of shells.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 17-Jun-2016
Nano Research
Nitrogen-doped graphene nanosheets as reactive water purification membranes

The development of effective and environmentally-friendly metal-free catalyst is the key to the persulfate activation technology. Herein, nitrogen-doped graphene (N-rGO) catalyst was prepared via hydrothermal method and the N-rGO filters were then synthesized by vacuum filtration. The results exemplified the advantages of organic compounds removal by catalytic activation of persulfate in a flow-through mode and demonstrated the potential towards practical applications.

Contact: Wenbo Tian
tianwb@tup.tsinghua.edu.cn
Tsinghua University Press

Public Release: 17-Jun-2016
Science
The FBI must develop 21st century investigative savvy

The FBI must develop modern technological capacities rather than relying on out-of-date approaches, Susan Landau argues in this Policy Forum, zeroing in on the organization’s recent request to Apple to develop software through which to access an iPhone -- rather than tackling the issue through its own technological efforts.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Jun-2016
Science
China’s environmental programs pass the test

China’s first national ecosystem assessment shows that major protection and restoration projects are improving ecosystem services, or “natural capital,” a new study reports.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 1-25 out of 543 releases.
    Click to go to page: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 ]